From Beyond Reviews

  • Aug 21, 2019

    Like the gloriously grotesque special effects, this deliriously disgusting hybrid is less slick than it is sloppy in how it fuses body horror, sadomasochism, and metaphysical/theological satire—the monstrous Dr. Pretorious asking to be prodded like the risen Christ to doubting Thomas; the enlarged pineal gland, the Cartesian seat of the soul, protruding like a phallic clitoris—though the result is nonetheless equal parts hilarious, exhilarating, and revolting. Happy birthday to that inveterate racist yet ingenious writer, HP Lovecraft.

    Like the gloriously grotesque special effects, this deliriously disgusting hybrid is less slick than it is sloppy in how it fuses body horror, sadomasochism, and metaphysical/theological satire—the monstrous Dr. Pretorious asking to be prodded like the risen Christ to doubting Thomas; the enlarged pineal gland, the Cartesian seat of the soul, protruding like a phallic clitoris—though the result is nonetheless equal parts hilarious, exhilarating, and revolting. Happy birthday to that inveterate racist yet ingenious writer, HP Lovecraft.

  • Dec 06, 2018

    Kinky sex and brain sucking. Whats not to like about Stuart Gordon's brilliant follow up to Re-Animator.

    Kinky sex and brain sucking. Whats not to like about Stuart Gordon's brilliant follow up to Re-Animator.

  • Nov 01, 2018

    Memorable kills and a unique plot makes this film stand out

    Memorable kills and a unique plot makes this film stand out

  • Sep 11, 2018

    Great pacing, acting and amazing effects. Everything you'd want from an 80s scifi horror.

    Great pacing, acting and amazing effects. Everything you'd want from an 80s scifi horror.

  • Feb 19, 2018

    Gooey and graphic, like “The Fly” on acid with some mildly pornographic overtones. A must see for aficionados of 1980s practical special effects.

    Gooey and graphic, like “The Fly” on acid with some mildly pornographic overtones. A must see for aficionados of 1980s practical special effects.

  • Dec 23, 2017

    One of my favorite adaptations. Great short story!

    One of my favorite adaptations. Great short story!

  • May 07, 2017

    It was interesting seeing Jeffrey Combs as the hero, feels like a spiritual sequel to Re-Animator.

    It was interesting seeing Jeffrey Combs as the hero, feels like a spiritual sequel to Re-Animator.

  • Apr 26, 2017

    great movie almost as good as reanimator

    great movie almost as good as reanimator

  • Feb 07, 2017

    Terrific piece of pulp horror that is an amazing treat for fans of this sort of film ("Re-Animator," "Night of the Creeps," "Dagon," etc.), gonzo over-the-top horror that's also smartly made. The team behind the cult classic "Re-Animator" followed that film up with one that I would are is even better. As with that film, this one is VERY loosely based on an H.P. Lovecraft story and made essentially a completely new story. What is true to Lovecraft's story is the basic premiss of a scientist making a machine that makes resonant vibrations that stimulate the peoples' pineal gland, activating dormant senses that allow them to see and experience a world that is all around us all the time, but imperceptible to our limited six senses. It's a pretty cool basic premiss and the story that gets aded around that premiss is that Crawford Tillinghast, the assistant of the scientist behind the resonator, is the only survivor of the machine's first use. After telling police what he's seen, he's placed into an insane asylum, but is soon release when gorgeous psychiasrist Barbara Crampton wants Tillinghast , played by the always great Jeffrey Combs, to return to the scene of his menotors death and to resume his experiments. They're also accompanied by Ken Foree, who I don't think I've ever seen in anything outside of George Romero and Rob Zombie films. To reveal much more would spoil the film, but the filmmakers go absolutely over-the-top, just as they did with "Re-Animator," though I don't think this film is quite as tongue-in-cheek as it's predacessor, which I also think works to it's benefit. I will say that the monsters created in this film are wildly creative and entertaining. Sure, they're kind of corny by today's special effects standards, but there really is something to be said for drippy, gooey, practical special effects being better than CGI. Lovecreaft famousely described his monsters and creatures as indescribables, but I'll have to give director Gordon some bigtime credit for coming up with some wildly outrageous creatures. Top this all off with underrated film composer Richard Band's best score and you have a 1980s horror classic. And one interesting bit of trivia, the resonator sound effects were sampled in the The Beastie Boys song "Intergalactic."

    Terrific piece of pulp horror that is an amazing treat for fans of this sort of film ("Re-Animator," "Night of the Creeps," "Dagon," etc.), gonzo over-the-top horror that's also smartly made. The team behind the cult classic "Re-Animator" followed that film up with one that I would are is even better. As with that film, this one is VERY loosely based on an H.P. Lovecraft story and made essentially a completely new story. What is true to Lovecraft's story is the basic premiss of a scientist making a machine that makes resonant vibrations that stimulate the peoples' pineal gland, activating dormant senses that allow them to see and experience a world that is all around us all the time, but imperceptible to our limited six senses. It's a pretty cool basic premiss and the story that gets aded around that premiss is that Crawford Tillinghast, the assistant of the scientist behind the resonator, is the only survivor of the machine's first use. After telling police what he's seen, he's placed into an insane asylum, but is soon release when gorgeous psychiasrist Barbara Crampton wants Tillinghast , played by the always great Jeffrey Combs, to return to the scene of his menotors death and to resume his experiments. They're also accompanied by Ken Foree, who I don't think I've ever seen in anything outside of George Romero and Rob Zombie films. To reveal much more would spoil the film, but the filmmakers go absolutely over-the-top, just as they did with "Re-Animator," though I don't think this film is quite as tongue-in-cheek as it's predacessor, which I also think works to it's benefit. I will say that the monsters created in this film are wildly creative and entertaining. Sure, they're kind of corny by today's special effects standards, but there really is something to be said for drippy, gooey, practical special effects being better than CGI. Lovecreaft famousely described his monsters and creatures as indescribables, but I'll have to give director Gordon some bigtime credit for coming up with some wildly outrageous creatures. Top this all off with underrated film composer Richard Band's best score and you have a 1980s horror classic. And one interesting bit of trivia, the resonator sound effects were sampled in the The Beastie Boys song "Intergalactic."

  • Dec 11, 2016

    A work of genius by a true master in Stuart Gordon at the height of his career, when Empire Pictures commanded decent budgets and effects work. Deft use of mostly interiors and sound stages once again. Brilliant acting from the great Jeffrey Combs and always steady Barbara Crampton, who reverse their respective roles in The Re-Animator to great effect. Wonderful practical effects, great set design and lighting. It's everything you want a classic American 1980s horror film to be, and it's also one of the best Lovecraft adaptations ever (Gordon directed nearly all the other contenders).

    A work of genius by a true master in Stuart Gordon at the height of his career, when Empire Pictures commanded decent budgets and effects work. Deft use of mostly interiors and sound stages once again. Brilliant acting from the great Jeffrey Combs and always steady Barbara Crampton, who reverse their respective roles in The Re-Animator to great effect. Wonderful practical effects, great set design and lighting. It's everything you want a classic American 1980s horror film to be, and it's also one of the best Lovecraft adaptations ever (Gordon directed nearly all the other contenders).