Herself Reviews

  • 16h ago

    'Herself' is one of the few films that accurately depicts PTSD when it comes to an abusive partner. It doesn't matter if the abuse is emotional, physical, or any other abuse is still abuse. The filmmakers are also able to illustrate just how that damage changes kids and their view of the world. It also shows just how the government (in this case Ireland) often gets in the way of somebody trying to do the right thing. Clare Dunne, who stars, was clearly heavily involved. She has a 'story by' credit to go along with co-writing. While there's a lot of lovely songs they're often way too on the nose. This is a really good story, but perhaps focusing on the emotional abuse side would give it too much emotion. The final act is pretty much exactly how you'd expect a PG version to end up which is disappointing considering just how powerful the first few minutes of the movie were. Final Score: 7.5/10

    'Herself' is one of the few films that accurately depicts PTSD when it comes to an abusive partner. It doesn't matter if the abuse is emotional, physical, or any other abuse is still abuse. The filmmakers are also able to illustrate just how that damage changes kids and their view of the world. It also shows just how the government (in this case Ireland) often gets in the way of somebody trying to do the right thing. Clare Dunne, who stars, was clearly heavily involved. She has a 'story by' credit to go along with co-writing. While there's a lot of lovely songs they're often way too on the nose. This is a really good story, but perhaps focusing on the emotional abuse side would give it too much emotion. The final act is pretty much exactly how you'd expect a PG version to end up which is disappointing considering just how powerful the first few minutes of the movie were. Final Score: 7.5/10

  • 2d ago

    It takes a lot for me to like feel-good, inspirational, people-pleasing movies. It might have to do with me, but often, I find such movies overly simple, cheesy, sappy, and/or too inoffensive. But, I saw the decent scores and saw the trailer and decided it should be one of the many movies I see in a year. And... I liked it. Most of the acting is good. I really didn't find anyone in it that I felt did a bad performance. However, I felt the stand outs were Clare Dunne as our leading lady and even the child actresses playing her children (Molly McCann and Ruby Rose O'Hara). Often times, child actors can be a hit or miss and more often than not, they are just there to be cute in these types of films. I was pleasantly surprised with the young actresses. Hell, one of the moments that struck me on a personal note was the youngest daughter not wanting to visit her father when he had visiting rights. While the film makes it out to be a twist, it was very obvious to me that the youngest daughter witness her father brutally beat her mother. Haunted by that horror, she's too scared to visit her father, even though he honestly might not harm her, as abusive to his wife as he is. While my situation was not like the little girl's, let's just say something similar enough to it happened that made me feel for this girl in a way that reminded me of myself. I never thought this film would strike me in such a way. I enjoyed the aspect of our main character building a home and rebuilding her life. The soundtrack using popular music for these building montages could have been very sappy, but it never annoyed me the way other films have done. I also liked that this film was willing to go to dark places and ballsy enough to have an ending I didn't see coming. I can see people being pissed off by the ending. It really does have the clichés and tropes of inoffensive, crowd-pleasing, feel-good films, but it never felt as bad as the generic ones that are often too happy and simplistic for my taste. Honestly, Herself is more deserving of 3 stars as it is a film I liked, but was never really in love with it. It is simply the good version of a feel-good movie. However, because there was a few things that impressed me more than the average film of its genre, I'm willing to bump my rating up to 3.5.

    It takes a lot for me to like feel-good, inspirational, people-pleasing movies. It might have to do with me, but often, I find such movies overly simple, cheesy, sappy, and/or too inoffensive. But, I saw the decent scores and saw the trailer and decided it should be one of the many movies I see in a year. And... I liked it. Most of the acting is good. I really didn't find anyone in it that I felt did a bad performance. However, I felt the stand outs were Clare Dunne as our leading lady and even the child actresses playing her children (Molly McCann and Ruby Rose O'Hara). Often times, child actors can be a hit or miss and more often than not, they are just there to be cute in these types of films. I was pleasantly surprised with the young actresses. Hell, one of the moments that struck me on a personal note was the youngest daughter not wanting to visit her father when he had visiting rights. While the film makes it out to be a twist, it was very obvious to me that the youngest daughter witness her father brutally beat her mother. Haunted by that horror, she's too scared to visit her father, even though he honestly might not harm her, as abusive to his wife as he is. While my situation was not like the little girl's, let's just say something similar enough to it happened that made me feel for this girl in a way that reminded me of myself. I never thought this film would strike me in such a way. I enjoyed the aspect of our main character building a home and rebuilding her life. The soundtrack using popular music for these building montages could have been very sappy, but it never annoyed me the way other films have done. I also liked that this film was willing to go to dark places and ballsy enough to have an ending I didn't see coming. I can see people being pissed off by the ending. It really does have the clichés and tropes of inoffensive, crowd-pleasing, feel-good films, but it never felt as bad as the generic ones that are often too happy and simplistic for my taste. Honestly, Herself is more deserving of 3 stars as it is a film I liked, but was never really in love with it. It is simply the good version of a feel-good movie. However, because there was a few things that impressed me more than the average film of its genre, I'm willing to bump my rating up to 3.5.

  • 3d ago

    "Herself" tells the age old story of a mom with young kids who has to rebuild her life. She works multiple jobs and lives hand to mouth to take care of her kids. She is stuck in a difficult situation made worse by an abusive ex and a court system judging her actions. She decides to build her family a home and does it with the support and free labor of good hearted people who understand her situation. The movie is uplifting and inspiring while reminding us the situation they are in is universal. Every community has families struggling to provide a safe and secure life for their children.

    "Herself" tells the age old story of a mom with young kids who has to rebuild her life. She works multiple jobs and lives hand to mouth to take care of her kids. She is stuck in a difficult situation made worse by an abusive ex and a court system judging her actions. She decides to build her family a home and does it with the support and free labor of good hearted people who understand her situation. The movie is uplifting and inspiring while reminding us the situation they are in is universal. Every community has families struggling to provide a safe and secure life for their children.

  • 4d ago

    Depressing but well acted by Dunne. Good drama.

    Depressing but well acted by Dunne. Good drama.

  • 4d ago

    Phyllida Lloyd takes to the helm bringing life to Malcolm Campbell and Clare Dunne's heartfelt story of trauma and intimacy by exploring the lengths to which a mother will go to protect those she holds dearest. "Herself" is an emotional rollercoaster of a film that will continuously have you pondering on what is to come next. With a great cast including Harriet Walter and co-writer Clare Dunne acting as the true lead, the film never fails to bring performers who skillfully bring their characters to life. At times, good performances can mean nothing if what the script presents is simply drivel. Fortunately, "Herself" features an effective narrative that is only ever bogged down at times by minor plot conveniences that are sorely reliant on luck. In the current landscape of films, had another writer or director utilized this subject matter, it could have been a dreadful experience. But, "Herself" escapes that space and is benefited by that choice as it feels like a breath of fresh summer air. "Herself" tells the story of a single mother struggling with the physical and mental traumas dealt upon her by an abusive ex-husband who seeks to devastate everything she is attempting to build for her two young girls. Sandra (Clare Dunne) has lived in an abusive relationship with Gary (Ian Lloyd Anderson) for some time as the pair have two little children, Emma (Ruby Rose O'Hara) and Molly (Molly McCann). By doing what she can, Sandra has hidden materials from Gary and developed code words with her daughters as she prepared for the worst. One day when these very things are exposed, Gary storms in and severely injures Sandra with no remorse. However, when a pair of unexpecting eyes witness the abuse first hand, Sandra takes the initiative and promptly removes herself and her two children from the vile household in which they resided. We follow the journey of Sandra as she navigates the complicated world to the best of her ability in the hopes of creating a new and improved life for her dearest daughters. All the while, adversarial forces attempt to lay waste to everything she works to manifest while other gracious acts of kindness are bestowed upon aiding in her cause. It should come as no surprise, but with Clare Dunne not only penning the script for the film but also starring in it, she soars by delivering a riveting performance. Infused with such raw emotion, Dunne brings every scene to life as we witness her trials and tribulations of growth and self-discovery. Everything she delivers is amplified to a masterful level, that we as an audience can almost immediately buy into her character and her engaging connections with her children, who also do a perfect job encapsulating their characters. Co-stars Ruby Rose O'Hara and Molly McCann bring an extra sense of genuine life to the screen that is often not always seen by young performers. O'Hara and McCann balance each other well in a cute sisterhood relationship that feels as natural as can be. Both girls also fantastically reciprocate the love Dunne puts forth so much so, that at times you may forget they are even performing as everything winds up feeling organic. Harriet Walter also takes up a prominent role in the film as Peggy, the retired doctor Dunne's character Sandra is caretaking. Walter starts the film by being an agitated character also searching for a sense of reason as age continues to battle her. However, as the narrative unfolds, Walter's joyous transformation will speak volumes and show how one single act of charity can change a person's life forever. It is a testament to the film's cast as although only a small handful of characters can be considered major, even the ancillary side ones are too fully realized and have pure moments of joy that will make you smile all the way through. "Herself" does not possess the most complex or multilayered in-depth script of all time, but it more than makes up for it by delivering a concise story from start to finish. Malcolm Campbell and Clare Dunne forge a story about the traumatic experiences of domestic abuse that does not wallow in its atrocities, but instead focuses on the beauties life has to offer just on the other side. It was rather refreshing to able to sit down and watch a film that does not take a heavy approach to conveying its message, instead the writers and director take their time conveying the ideas through subtle ways. For a portion of the film, Sandra and her two daughters find themselves living in a hotel directly under an airport. Although a minor exchange is held between the characters discussing their living situation, it is not a point of discussion that is brought up ad nauseam just to make Sandra feel worse about everything around her. Instead, a slight emotional tool is employed to generate the same kind of response. Every time we are in the hotel room, the sound of an airplane passing overheard loudly carries throughout the room. This tiny detail alone creates a genuine feeling of sadness by painting the contrast of Sandra's ill-fated circumstances and inability to secure home with the freedoms of the more fortunate who choose where they desire to go. With no verbal mention of this conflict, the film does a genius job of displaying the crumbling weight of it all. "Herself" also tells a story that gives the audience room to breathe, but always keeps you on your toes because of its rollercoaster of a plot. Peaceful moments of love and comradery are deeply played against harsh and devastating scenes to create a film that pushes and pulls your emotions in every direction. "Herself" is an awe-inspiring feel-good film hidden under the veneer of trauma and abuse. It tells the story of how good people with the will to succeed will always find a way to rise above the negativity no matter the circumstances. With a quality cast that bolsters the strength of the narrative every step of the way, "Herself" will engage audiences from start to finish. However, no film is perfect, as certain plot points introduced may often come about purely through chance luck. The original score of the film is also very minimal and entirely insignificant with the primary soundtrack being composed of licensed tracks that can often feel misplaced or odd when they are played. Nevertheless, these minor gripes are never enough to shatter the beautiful story the entire cast and crew assembled to brilliantly create. Final Verdict: B

    Phyllida Lloyd takes to the helm bringing life to Malcolm Campbell and Clare Dunne's heartfelt story of trauma and intimacy by exploring the lengths to which a mother will go to protect those she holds dearest. "Herself" is an emotional rollercoaster of a film that will continuously have you pondering on what is to come next. With a great cast including Harriet Walter and co-writer Clare Dunne acting as the true lead, the film never fails to bring performers who skillfully bring their characters to life. At times, good performances can mean nothing if what the script presents is simply drivel. Fortunately, "Herself" features an effective narrative that is only ever bogged down at times by minor plot conveniences that are sorely reliant on luck. In the current landscape of films, had another writer or director utilized this subject matter, it could have been a dreadful experience. But, "Herself" escapes that space and is benefited by that choice as it feels like a breath of fresh summer air. "Herself" tells the story of a single mother struggling with the physical and mental traumas dealt upon her by an abusive ex-husband who seeks to devastate everything she is attempting to build for her two young girls. Sandra (Clare Dunne) has lived in an abusive relationship with Gary (Ian Lloyd Anderson) for some time as the pair have two little children, Emma (Ruby Rose O'Hara) and Molly (Molly McCann). By doing what she can, Sandra has hidden materials from Gary and developed code words with her daughters as she prepared for the worst. One day when these very things are exposed, Gary storms in and severely injures Sandra with no remorse. However, when a pair of unexpecting eyes witness the abuse first hand, Sandra takes the initiative and promptly removes herself and her two children from the vile household in which they resided. We follow the journey of Sandra as she navigates the complicated world to the best of her ability in the hopes of creating a new and improved life for her dearest daughters. All the while, adversarial forces attempt to lay waste to everything she works to manifest while other gracious acts of kindness are bestowed upon aiding in her cause. It should come as no surprise, but with Clare Dunne not only penning the script for the film but also starring in it, she soars by delivering a riveting performance. Infused with such raw emotion, Dunne brings every scene to life as we witness her trials and tribulations of growth and self-discovery. Everything she delivers is amplified to a masterful level, that we as an audience can almost immediately buy into her character and her engaging connections with her children, who also do a perfect job encapsulating their characters. Co-stars Ruby Rose O'Hara and Molly McCann bring an extra sense of genuine life to the screen that is often not always seen by young performers. O'Hara and McCann balance each other well in a cute sisterhood relationship that feels as natural as can be. Both girls also fantastically reciprocate the love Dunne puts forth so much so, that at times you may forget they are even performing as everything winds up feeling organic. Harriet Walter also takes up a prominent role in the film as Peggy, the retired doctor Dunne's character Sandra is caretaking. Walter starts the film by being an agitated character also searching for a sense of reason as age continues to battle her. However, as the narrative unfolds, Walter's joyous transformation will speak volumes and show how one single act of charity can change a person's life forever. It is a testament to the film's cast as although only a small handful of characters can be considered major, even the ancillary side ones are too fully realized and have pure moments of joy that will make you smile all the way through. "Herself" does not possess the most complex or multilayered in-depth script of all time, but it more than makes up for it by delivering a concise story from start to finish. Malcolm Campbell and Clare Dunne forge a story about the traumatic experiences of domestic abuse that does not wallow in its atrocities, but instead focuses on the beauties life has to offer just on the other side. It was rather refreshing to able to sit down and watch a film that does not take a heavy approach to conveying its message, instead the writers and director take their time conveying the ideas through subtle ways. For a portion of the film, Sandra and her two daughters find themselves living in a hotel directly under an airport. Although a minor exchange is held between the characters discussing their living situation, it is not a point of discussion that is brought up ad nauseam just to make Sandra feel worse about everything around her. Instead, a slight emotional tool is employed to generate the same kind of response. Every time we are in the hotel room, the sound of an airplane passing overheard loudly carries throughout the room. This tiny detail alone creates a genuine feeling of sadness by painting the contrast of Sandra's ill-fated circumstances and inability to secure home with the freedoms of the more fortunate who choose where they desire to go. With no verbal mention of this conflict, the film does a genius job of displaying the crumbling weight of it all. "Herself" also tells a story that gives the audience room to breathe, but always keeps you on your toes because of its rollercoaster of a plot. Peaceful moments of love and comradery are deeply played against harsh and devastating scenes to create a film that pushes and pulls your emotions in every direction. "Herself" is an awe-inspiring feel-good film hidden under the veneer of trauma and abuse. It tells the story of how good people with the will to succeed will always find a way to rise above the negativity no matter the circumstances. With a quality cast that bolsters the strength of the narrative every step of the way, "Herself" will engage audiences from start to finish. However, no film is perfect, as certain plot points introduced may often come about purely through chance luck. The original score of the film is also very minimal and entirely insignificant with the primary soundtrack being composed of licensed tracks that can often feel misplaced or odd when they are played. Nevertheless, these minor gripes are never enough to shatter the beautiful story the entire cast and crew assembled to brilliantly create. Final Verdict: B

  • 5d ago

    Many films draw optimistic conclusions from stories soaked in cruelty and cynicism. Phyllida Lloyd's "Herself" is the rare movie with optimism baked into its foundations. From the very start of the script penned by Malcolm Campbell and star Clare Dunne, this Amazon Prime original poses an unblinking faith in the goodness of people beneath its brutal depiction of the hardships they face. It's a feel-good movie, but not the kind that spoon-feeds the audience a bucket of frosting for ninety minutes, as I've put it before. Instead, after putting decent people's integrity to the test, this is the kind of film that rewards them for their kindness even though they aren't asking for one. What a lovely, lovely movie this was. Dunne plays Sandra, a mother of two beaming young girls (Ruby Rose O'hara and Molly McCann) who's been planning to leave her abusive partner, Gary (Ian Lloyd Anderson), in pursuit of a safer household for her daughters, and when he viciously assaults her in the kitchen one day and breaks her hand, she sends her oldest, Emma, to get help and she makes her escape. Temporarily squatting at a hotel, greater hardship awaits this newly-single mom as she struggles to find a stable home for her daughters while working both at a pub and as a caretaker to her late mother's former employer, Peggy (Harriet Walter), who requires assistance due to a hip injury. Sandra begins weighing her options for the future of her family, and what sparks as an amusing idea of fleeting significance grows into a plan. She wants to build her own house. It doesn't seem realistic at first, but her pipe dream becomes feasible when she does the math and gets proper consultation from kind-hearted contractor Aido (Conleth Hill), who will go on to lend her a major hand during the construction of her modest, minimalist home while Peggy allows Sandra to build for free on her unused properly while also loaning her the €35,000 she needs to get started. Gary's manipulative methods of attempting to pull Sandra back into the life she ran away from proves to be a dangerous threat when her parenting is eventually put into question before a judge on ludicrous grounds, where it becomes uncertain whether she'll have a family to inhabit the house once construction is finished. Watching the climactic trial scene where Sandra implores the judge to examine her qualities as a parent beyond her minor misjudgments and human errors against Gary's toxic nature, I was reminded of something Charlie Chaplin said in his powerful monologue at the end of 1940's "The Great Dictator," of all things. "Our knowledge has made us cynical," he decrees in an international broadcast. "Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost." Herself is a film with an elevated moral center that outweighs its intelligence. It chooses kindness over cleverness, and that's a compliment. The elevator pitch here is a not-so-subtle demonstration of the lengths a parent will go to build their children a better life, and I'd be lying if I claimed that Herself offers too many surprises within Sandra's story that distinguishes the film too significantly from other motivational tearjerkers of its kind. This movie is not above a building montage set to a pop song, or a crowd-pleasing third-act speech, or themes as simplistic as "Be kind" or "Teamwork makes the dream work." Nothing new, but it's the extent at which the film believes in these morals that makes it such a heartwarmer. "Earnest" doesn't even cover it. Neither does "heartwarmer," come to think. What's most impressive about Dunne's performance is how much vulnerability she exudes for a character that pretty much epitomizes strength. Sandra is a friggin' superhero, but Dunne does not play her like one. She gains audience support immediately due to how deeply she is wronged and how much is at stake, but she elevates this character to a higher realm of accessibility in her obliviousness to the courage and vigor she demonstrates in the pursuit of giving her daughters a better life. She's been knocked down by life so many times that she becomes blind to her tenacious ability to get back up again -- as well as the people there to pull her up, if needed. She was forced to endure a relationship that brought her nothing but pain, forced to witness her daughters idolize the man who abused her all that time, and she's left with doubts about the morality of the world. Like bad people are destined to be rewarded and good people's fate hangs at the mercy of those people. Like it's all backward, and wired to destroy true, genuine values. I think we all feel like that sometimes. But the arc of ethical assurance that Herself creates crucially exists internally, with Sandra in her struggle to defeat her crushing perception of the world, and not externally, with an arc of "world bad" to "world good" projected onto her environment to represent a similar message through superficial and dishonest means. For me, that frame of a potentially paper-thin theme gave way for such a ceaseless emotional investment in this character that nearly every beat of Sandra's story floored me. Some tears were sorrowful, others joyful. But I didn't sob until the credits. Sobs of catharsis.

    Many films draw optimistic conclusions from stories soaked in cruelty and cynicism. Phyllida Lloyd's "Herself" is the rare movie with optimism baked into its foundations. From the very start of the script penned by Malcolm Campbell and star Clare Dunne, this Amazon Prime original poses an unblinking faith in the goodness of people beneath its brutal depiction of the hardships they face. It's a feel-good movie, but not the kind that spoon-feeds the audience a bucket of frosting for ninety minutes, as I've put it before. Instead, after putting decent people's integrity to the test, this is the kind of film that rewards them for their kindness even though they aren't asking for one. What a lovely, lovely movie this was. Dunne plays Sandra, a mother of two beaming young girls (Ruby Rose O'hara and Molly McCann) who's been planning to leave her abusive partner, Gary (Ian Lloyd Anderson), in pursuit of a safer household for her daughters, and when he viciously assaults her in the kitchen one day and breaks her hand, she sends her oldest, Emma, to get help and she makes her escape. Temporarily squatting at a hotel, greater hardship awaits this newly-single mom as she struggles to find a stable home for her daughters while working both at a pub and as a caretaker to her late mother's former employer, Peggy (Harriet Walter), who requires assistance due to a hip injury. Sandra begins weighing her options for the future of her family, and what sparks as an amusing idea of fleeting significance grows into a plan. She wants to build her own house. It doesn't seem realistic at first, but her pipe dream becomes feasible when she does the math and gets proper consultation from kind-hearted contractor Aido (Conleth Hill), who will go on to lend her a major hand during the construction of her modest, minimalist home while Peggy allows Sandra to build for free on her unused properly while also loaning her the €35,000 she needs to get started. Gary's manipulative methods of attempting to pull Sandra back into the life she ran away from proves to be a dangerous threat when her parenting is eventually put into question before a judge on ludicrous grounds, where it becomes uncertain whether she'll have a family to inhabit the house once construction is finished. Watching the climactic trial scene where Sandra implores the judge to examine her qualities as a parent beyond her minor misjudgments and human errors against Gary's toxic nature, I was reminded of something Charlie Chaplin said in his powerful monologue at the end of 1940's "The Great Dictator," of all things. "Our knowledge has made us cynical," he decrees in an international broadcast. "Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost." Herself is a film with an elevated moral center that outweighs its intelligence. It chooses kindness over cleverness, and that's a compliment. The elevator pitch here is a not-so-subtle demonstration of the lengths a parent will go to build their children a better life, and I'd be lying if I claimed that Herself offers too many surprises within Sandra's story that distinguishes the film too significantly from other motivational tearjerkers of its kind. This movie is not above a building montage set to a pop song, or a crowd-pleasing third-act speech, or themes as simplistic as "Be kind" or "Teamwork makes the dream work." Nothing new, but it's the extent at which the film believes in these morals that makes it such a heartwarmer. "Earnest" doesn't even cover it. Neither does "heartwarmer," come to think. What's most impressive about Dunne's performance is how much vulnerability she exudes for a character that pretty much epitomizes strength. Sandra is a friggin' superhero, but Dunne does not play her like one. She gains audience support immediately due to how deeply she is wronged and how much is at stake, but she elevates this character to a higher realm of accessibility in her obliviousness to the courage and vigor she demonstrates in the pursuit of giving her daughters a better life. She's been knocked down by life so many times that she becomes blind to her tenacious ability to get back up again -- as well as the people there to pull her up, if needed. She was forced to endure a relationship that brought her nothing but pain, forced to witness her daughters idolize the man who abused her all that time, and she's left with doubts about the morality of the world. Like bad people are destined to be rewarded and good people's fate hangs at the mercy of those people. Like it's all backward, and wired to destroy true, genuine values. I think we all feel like that sometimes. But the arc of ethical assurance that Herself creates crucially exists internally, with Sandra in her struggle to defeat her crushing perception of the world, and not externally, with an arc of "world bad" to "world good" projected onto her environment to represent a similar message through superficial and dishonest means. For me, that frame of a potentially paper-thin theme gave way for such a ceaseless emotional investment in this character that nearly every beat of Sandra's story floored me. Some tears were sorrowful, others joyful. But I didn't sob until the credits. Sobs of catharsis.

  • Jan 21, 2021

    For me, this movie hits me on so many levels. As a person who grew up in a single-parent home, the events that unfold in Herself are far too familiar. Great performances, great pacing, and amazing script. The best film f 2021...so far

    For me, this movie hits me on so many levels. As a person who grew up in a single-parent home, the events that unfold in Herself are far too familiar. Great performances, great pacing, and amazing script. The best film f 2021...so far

  • Jan 18, 2021

    Inspiring story of a single mother's struggles to overcome the barriers caused by domestic violence.

    Inspiring story of a single mother's struggles to overcome the barriers caused by domestic violence.

  • Jan 17, 2021

    Amazon film about a woman (played by Clare Dunne) who escapes her abusive husband with her two young children and embarks on a journey to build herself a house. The acting and writing in this one is quite good and the film handles a difficult subject matter with sensitivity.

    Amazon film about a woman (played by Clare Dunne) who escapes her abusive husband with her two young children and embarks on a journey to build herself a house. The acting and writing in this one is quite good and the film handles a difficult subject matter with sensitivity.

  • Jan 16, 2021

    This is a lovely Irish movie about a woman and her girls, trying to make a life for themselves after spousal abuse. Strangers come together to help her build her future.

    This is a lovely Irish movie about a woman and her girls, trying to make a life for themselves after spousal abuse. Strangers come together to help her build her future.