Jauja Reviews

  • Apr 10, 2018

    Beautifully set in rural Argentina offering some beautiful cinematography, this is a film of few words which rewards viewers' patience, albeit perhaps not with rewards sought.

    Beautifully set in rural Argentina offering some beautiful cinematography, this is a film of few words which rewards viewers' patience, albeit perhaps not with rewards sought.

  • Jul 12, 2017

    I was very surprised to see this highly rated on RT! It's definitely not an easy or conventional film but this is why it works so well. I saw this film on a whim, simply needed to see any foreign film for a college course. I simply chose the one with Viggo and I was not disappointed. Jauja is one of the most unique films I have ever seen. The absence of dialogue is strange but works extremely well, reflecting the loneliness of life in the desert. The cinematography with its long and deliberate shots is absolutely gorgeous. The second half of the film is where this movie shines. Just as the desert draws in Dennisen this film draws in the viewer. This is truly one to lose yourself in and hopefully you do!

    I was very surprised to see this highly rated on RT! It's definitely not an easy or conventional film but this is why it works so well. I saw this film on a whim, simply needed to see any foreign film for a college course. I simply chose the one with Viggo and I was not disappointed. Jauja is one of the most unique films I have ever seen. The absence of dialogue is strange but works extremely well, reflecting the loneliness of life in the desert. The cinematography with its long and deliberate shots is absolutely gorgeous. The second half of the film is where this movie shines. Just as the desert draws in Dennisen this film draws in the viewer. This is truly one to lose yourself in and hopefully you do!

  • May 29, 2017

    A bit of a mind twister, but ... replace the North Sea for the South Atlantic and tundra for desert and you end up with a Lisandro Alonso film that could fit, with a twist, into Scandinavian art.

    A bit of a mind twister, but ... replace the North Sea for the South Atlantic and tundra for desert and you end up with a Lisandro Alonso film that could fit, with a twist, into Scandinavian art.

  • Jul 22, 2016

    Just a failed attempt to imitate Meek's Cutoff, you know

    Just a failed attempt to imitate Meek's Cutoff, you know

  • Apr 06, 2016

    Oddball from director Lisandro Alonso with Viggo Mortensen in the lead as the Danish and Spanish speaking man that's on some sort of trip with his daughter. They are wandering in an open, desert-like area. We don't know exactly where they are ore where they are going. We know there are some creepy guys there, that want's the young daughter, and that there's a murderous man in a dress someplace in the district. Well, the girl gets separated from her dad and he takes up the hunt. He does a great job here, by the way. He seem pretty outwarn after some playtime. There are not much else to the plot here. Shot in 4:3 format with rounded corners, capturing amazing nature scenery with slow - if any - movement and shots mostly passing the minute. Every frame seem like an image, some of them are outrageously beautiful. Absorb the images. Try cathing the drift. Maybe you will be rewarded. Not a film for everyone, it's loved or hated by critics. If you are in for something linear or entertainment you should stay away from this artsy western. Poetical, mysterious, weird and open film, that's very challanging. I got some mixed feelings here, but this will be a grower on me. It's It reminds me of so many great films, but it still stands out from all of them. "Valhalla Rising", "Stalker" or something Reygadas or Ceylan could have done comes quickly to mind. The negative part was some boring, almost dragging parts. It's easy to slip out of the mood here, it's not that interesting. The fantatic job by cinematographer Timo Salminen make sure it will stick with me, so I guess I'm on the "love"-side of the critic's splitting. 8 out of 10 toy soliders.

    Oddball from director Lisandro Alonso with Viggo Mortensen in the lead as the Danish and Spanish speaking man that's on some sort of trip with his daughter. They are wandering in an open, desert-like area. We don't know exactly where they are ore where they are going. We know there are some creepy guys there, that want's the young daughter, and that there's a murderous man in a dress someplace in the district. Well, the girl gets separated from her dad and he takes up the hunt. He does a great job here, by the way. He seem pretty outwarn after some playtime. There are not much else to the plot here. Shot in 4:3 format with rounded corners, capturing amazing nature scenery with slow - if any - movement and shots mostly passing the minute. Every frame seem like an image, some of them are outrageously beautiful. Absorb the images. Try cathing the drift. Maybe you will be rewarded. Not a film for everyone, it's loved or hated by critics. If you are in for something linear or entertainment you should stay away from this artsy western. Poetical, mysterious, weird and open film, that's very challanging. I got some mixed feelings here, but this will be a grower on me. It's It reminds me of so many great films, but it still stands out from all of them. "Valhalla Rising", "Stalker" or something Reygadas or Ceylan could have done comes quickly to mind. The negative part was some boring, almost dragging parts. It's easy to slip out of the mood here, it's not that interesting. The fantatic job by cinematographer Timo Salminen make sure it will stick with me, so I guess I'm on the "love"-side of the critic's splitting. 8 out of 10 toy soliders.

  • Jan 02, 2016

    underwhelming ending

    underwhelming ending

  • Dec 23, 2015

    Too slow for the conventional audience.

    Too slow for the conventional audience.

  • Dec 12, 2015

    Jauja focuses on a fidgety, nervous father who's dragged his daughter from Denmark to what is most likely South America only to realize that he doesn't belong there. He tries to pretend he's comfortable in his new surroundings, but gives up completely when his daughter runs away with a boy. He begins to see things that may not actually be there and wanders the desert indefinitely. The deliberate pace contributes to the surreal tone, the slow rhythm of the editing seeming slightly uncomfortable, making the final departure from reality feel like a natural progression from what has already been shown. There's an element of the universal human struggle to navigate a world we don't understand at play, as well as an acknowledgement of colonialism and its repercussions. It's a slow film, but it operates in the same vein as Kelly Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff and, as such, the slowness only contributes to the cumulative impact, in a way its strongest asset.

    Jauja focuses on a fidgety, nervous father who's dragged his daughter from Denmark to what is most likely South America only to realize that he doesn't belong there. He tries to pretend he's comfortable in his new surroundings, but gives up completely when his daughter runs away with a boy. He begins to see things that may not actually be there and wanders the desert indefinitely. The deliberate pace contributes to the surreal tone, the slow rhythm of the editing seeming slightly uncomfortable, making the final departure from reality feel like a natural progression from what has already been shown. There's an element of the universal human struggle to navigate a world we don't understand at play, as well as an acknowledgement of colonialism and its repercussions. It's a slow film, but it operates in the same vein as Kelly Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff and, as such, the slowness only contributes to the cumulative impact, in a way its strongest asset.

  • Oct 15, 2015

    A pretty bizarre flick, though it was interesting to see Viggo in a foreign movie. Not a lot of talking and the ending is some kind of twist I don't quite understand- dream within a dream within a dream?

    A pretty bizarre flick, though it was interesting to see Viggo in a foreign movie. Not a lot of talking and the ending is some kind of twist I don't quite understand- dream within a dream within a dream?

  • Sep 20, 2015

    The film starts in an interesting way, with the captivating painting-like cinematography and gorgeous landscapes. But the problem with this film is that it barely has the plot to fill a 20-minute short film, and Mr. Alonso mistakes the pace and tediousness of his shots for artistic contemplation. There are many other longer and slower films which are much more compelling and contemplative, and which I could recommend over this one. Especially, the 4-hour long 'Norte: The End of History' among the recently watched ones. The concept and intentions are good, which become clearer by the end, but that doesn't compensate for the shortcomings I mentioned before. Mr Mortensen is commendable in his multilingual role.

    The film starts in an interesting way, with the captivating painting-like cinematography and gorgeous landscapes. But the problem with this film is that it barely has the plot to fill a 20-minute short film, and Mr. Alonso mistakes the pace and tediousness of his shots for artistic contemplation. There are many other longer and slower films which are much more compelling and contemplative, and which I could recommend over this one. Especially, the 4-hour long 'Norte: The End of History' among the recently watched ones. The concept and intentions are good, which become clearer by the end, but that doesn't compensate for the shortcomings I mentioned before. Mr Mortensen is commendable in his multilingual role.