Jubilee Reviews

  • Mar 28, 2020

    I love how phantasmagorical this is. Its subculture penetrates deeper than its static "punk" "cult classic" label /put-down and confuses stereotypes with the transhistorical. It has to be paralleled that Ariel serves as both its Shakespearean root of androgynous mysticism and also a 20th century queer figure with pupils big as if on MDMA. It seems to align this highness with holiness.

    I love how phantasmagorical this is. Its subculture penetrates deeper than its static "punk" "cult classic" label /put-down and confuses stereotypes with the transhistorical. It has to be paralleled that Ariel serves as both its Shakespearean root of androgynous mysticism and also a 20th century queer figure with pupils big as if on MDMA. It seems to align this highness with holiness.

  • Jan 18, 2020

    Wayne(now Jayne) County steals the show with "Paranoia Paradise".

    Wayne(now Jayne) County steals the show with "Paranoia Paradise".

  • Apr 16, 2019

    Fantasy punk noir? Magic realism? Special for being entirely watchable despite its experimental appearance. Fascinating and fun.

    Fantasy punk noir? Magic realism? Special for being entirely watchable despite its experimental appearance. Fascinating and fun.

  • Feb 05, 2019

    My first Derek Jarman film and blown away by the artistic aesthetic of Jubilee from it's satire to its fashion.

    My first Derek Jarman film and blown away by the artistic aesthetic of Jubilee from it's satire to its fashion.

  • Sep 21, 2016

    Derek Jarman's bizarre dystopian comedy still feels eons ahead of its time, even if it's quite possibly the most punk-rock movie ever made. Seemingly including all of the filmmaker's interests (i.e. Shakespeare, sexuality, the 70s punk movement), Jubilee is absolutely a vanity project, but it's fascinating in a way that keeps it from being esoteric. The scenes and characters are always imaginative, and the philosophical dialogue is playful rather than preachy. While shot on an extremely small budget, Jarman still impressively captures a post-apocalyptic London (albeit one that appears to have a modicum of electric power), and it's a good bet to ascertain that Blade Runner might have taken a bit of its look from this movie. Punk fans are likely to get the most from this movie (the cast is basically a who's-who of icons from the era), and the story dissipates in a not fully forgivable fashion, but Jubilee's place in cult cinema should not be ignored by any cinephile.

    Derek Jarman's bizarre dystopian comedy still feels eons ahead of its time, even if it's quite possibly the most punk-rock movie ever made. Seemingly including all of the filmmaker's interests (i.e. Shakespeare, sexuality, the 70s punk movement), Jubilee is absolutely a vanity project, but it's fascinating in a way that keeps it from being esoteric. The scenes and characters are always imaginative, and the philosophical dialogue is playful rather than preachy. While shot on an extremely small budget, Jarman still impressively captures a post-apocalyptic London (albeit one that appears to have a modicum of electric power), and it's a good bet to ascertain that Blade Runner might have taken a bit of its look from this movie. Punk fans are likely to get the most from this movie (the cast is basically a who's-who of icons from the era), and the story dissipates in a not fully forgivable fashion, but Jubilee's place in cult cinema should not be ignored by any cinephile.

  • Jul 16, 2016

    A pretentious mish-mash that is rather dated. Fast forwarded through most of it. Not worth the bother.

    A pretentious mish-mash that is rather dated. Fast forwarded through most of it. Not worth the bother.

  • Dec 12, 2015

    Jubilee is a postmodern look at 1970s England, Jarman imagining a universe where those of the underground have taken over and left the world in ruin. Queen Elizabeth I is transported to this period by a spiritual being who shows her that England as she knows it is gone, and that the survivors are ballet dancers and punk rockers who flit around in the burning remnants of its historical and cultural influences. A gang of these people work together in a musical group, powerful women who use men as sexual objects before offing them and pal around with a couple of incestuous brothers, all while railing against any sort of established set of mores while simultaneously trying to achieve stardom. This sounds completely insane, and it is, but that insanity is put to good use. Jubilee satirizes British power structures and cultural hierarchies (the media, the aristocracy, the military, the police) and operates as a tribute to the underground and anti-establishment nature of punk rock and of the oppressed minorities who contribute to the genre. More than anything, it captures the essence of this lifestyle, featuring a few of its actual members (including Jayne County, the first of rock's transgender singers). It's gorgeous, but the movement doesn't get off without Jarman pointing out their own racial ignorances and the hypocrisy of those who eventually sign on to major labels to the tune of millions while simultaneously decrying the wealthy and powerful. I didn't watch this immediately after Haynes' Velvet Goldmine (another look at one of Britain's outsider-turned-mainstream rock genres) knowing that they'd be so similar, and while it pains me to compare two visionaries with such distinct concepts of their respective subjects, I have to say that Jarman's depiction is ultimately the better film. It captures the spirit of the punk lifestyle without stylish camera tricks, without a big budget (Jarman apparently had to starve himself to get this thing finished), and without sacrificing a tight narrative for the sake of visual ambition.

    Jubilee is a postmodern look at 1970s England, Jarman imagining a universe where those of the underground have taken over and left the world in ruin. Queen Elizabeth I is transported to this period by a spiritual being who shows her that England as she knows it is gone, and that the survivors are ballet dancers and punk rockers who flit around in the burning remnants of its historical and cultural influences. A gang of these people work together in a musical group, powerful women who use men as sexual objects before offing them and pal around with a couple of incestuous brothers, all while railing against any sort of established set of mores while simultaneously trying to achieve stardom. This sounds completely insane, and it is, but that insanity is put to good use. Jubilee satirizes British power structures and cultural hierarchies (the media, the aristocracy, the military, the police) and operates as a tribute to the underground and anti-establishment nature of punk rock and of the oppressed minorities who contribute to the genre. More than anything, it captures the essence of this lifestyle, featuring a few of its actual members (including Jayne County, the first of rock's transgender singers). It's gorgeous, but the movement doesn't get off without Jarman pointing out their own racial ignorances and the hypocrisy of those who eventually sign on to major labels to the tune of millions while simultaneously decrying the wealthy and powerful. I didn't watch this immediately after Haynes' Velvet Goldmine (another look at one of Britain's outsider-turned-mainstream rock genres) knowing that they'd be so similar, and while it pains me to compare two visionaries with such distinct concepts of their respective subjects, I have to say that Jarman's depiction is ultimately the better film. It captures the spirit of the punk lifestyle without stylish camera tricks, without a big budget (Jarman apparently had to starve himself to get this thing finished), and without sacrificing a tight narrative for the sake of visual ambition.

  • Jun 03, 2014

    One of the most accessible of Jarman's films; surreal and audacious, with Jordan's "Rule Britannia" a highlight.

    One of the most accessible of Jarman's films; surreal and audacious, with Jordan's "Rule Britannia" a highlight.

  • Jan 28, 2014

    Filme esquisito que poderia ser muito ruim. Lembrando do contexto da época me parece que acertou em alguns pontos e usou bem o exagero punk pra criticar um tanto a sociedade. Mas a linguagem teatral demais me incomoda.

    Filme esquisito que poderia ser muito ruim. Lembrando do contexto da época me parece que acertou em alguns pontos e usou bem o exagero punk pra criticar um tanto a sociedade. Mas a linguagem teatral demais me incomoda.

  • Jan 17, 2014

    flawed but still worth a look at late '70's UK besides any pic that can reference Shakespeare and Siouxsie and the Banshees can't be bad right?

    flawed but still worth a look at late '70's UK besides any pic that can reference Shakespeare and Siouxsie and the Banshees can't be bad right?