Margot at the Wedding - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Margot at the Wedding Reviews

Page 1 of 161
½ September 4, 2017
Noah Baumbach gets a few dark laughs out of this dramedy about a group of dysfunctional and unstable family members.
November 19, 2016
Speaks to Baumbach's strengths (showing really toxic dynamics accurately and deeply). Despite all of the characters being seriously unlikeable it was still engaging, although some might wonder what something like this contributes to the world. Not for everybody.
Super Reviewer
½ July 19, 2016
In its first half, it is amusing to laugh at the expense of how far these people can go in being obnoxious, but later on it appears that what Baumbach really wants is to defy us to endure a gallery of despicable characters till in the end it has become nearly insufferable to watch.
June 10, 2016
Noah Baumbach's "Interiors". Providing a difficult and often uncomfortable viewing, "Margot at the Wedding" boasts a rich tragi-comedy rooted in Freudian psychoanalysis and the influence of obsessive and neurotic behavior in a family hanging by a thread. The film features a pair of strong performances, perhaps none as striking as Nicole Kidman's, who plays a woman on the perpetual verge of a breakdown to perfection.
October 9, 2015
Good. That ending sure scared me. Jack Black stole the film, kind of unsurprisingly. I thought Nicole Kidman did great. Lots to figure out in this movie, and I felt like I probably missed a lot because of that--I spent the first 20 minutes figuring out everyone's name and relationship.
½ September 7, 2015
"For me, expectation just turns into disappointment, so ultimately I'd just rather not try."
Heavily borrowing from Woody Allen and to a lesser extent Godard, Noah Baumbach invents characters that have been wallowing in a bubble of self pity and faux existential crisis for years and have reached another point where something will have to give.
It's not done quite as well as in the squid in the whale, most likely due to a lack of involvement from Wes Anderson, but its a solid follow up exploring similar ground.
July 23, 2015
While I do admire the smart dialogue and bits of humor here and there, it lacks the makings of a standout movie from Noah Baumbach. I didn't enjoy it as much as Frances Ha.
½ April 13, 2015
It'll be a hard movie for some people to enjoy because the characters are so unlikable, but Noah Baumbach is so incredible at magnifying dysfunctional families. Everything feels so real and honest. Margot at the Wedding is A HELL of a lot darker than The Squid and the Whale and oftentimes ugly, but it works. You don't like these characters but you can't look away from them.
Robbanflix
Super Reviewer
January 2, 2015
This is a "drama" movie with some black comedy style. Its not like Jack Blacks other movies but he made a nice acting and Nicole Kidman aswell. Story is fair and quite simple and follow a family and their life days before a wedding..
November 17, 2014
Review In A Nutshell:

After seeing both Noah Baumbach's Frances Ha and The Squid and the Whale, I expected Margot at the Wedding to be well crafted and impacting film; especially given its amazing cast. Sadly the film does not meet those soaring expectations, but it did not completely underwhelm me either. There are certainly a number of positive elements in the film, and those were enough to keep me entertained and sticking it out with complete attention, all the way through.

The premise involves Margot coming back to her old home, along with her son Claude, to attend to her sister's wedding. Through this visit, issues and conflicting perspectives begin to arise, filling the atmosphere with tension and drama. I was immediately drawn into the characters of the film, regardless if their personalities come off as unlikeable. Margot's criticizing and "honest" nature makes her such a fascinating individual, and watching her affect the people around her, and without even a hint of understanding to the adverse effects of her actions. Though the film makes it clear that Margot is the damaged one, the rest of the characters are not as perfect as they seem. Pauline and Malcolm also carry their own set of baggage, but Baumbach does not pile it on to its audience, just as much as he does with Margot. As the film progresses, we see more of these characters as the constant clash of personalities forces them to act in ways that they normally wouldn't. The film also gives the time to explore Margot's relationship with her son and husband, and how her personality and her current situation affect them; I was constantly thinking about the structure and dynamic of her relationships, and why she is the way she is.

The film does not give away any easy answers about its characters, but it also fails to even address even the slightest on its purpose. Why does Baumbach want us to watch this story unfold? The previous two films I have seen from Baumbach demonstrated a sense purpose to their storylines; Frances Ha exploring the difficulties of pursuing passion over security, whilst also creating a sense of homage to the individuals that have inspired Baumbach in his filmmaking career. The Squid and the Whale explores the difficulties of divorce, told through the perspectives of each member of that once-nuclear family and honestly exposing personal aspects of Baumbach's own childhood. This film barely brings anything and because of that, I was left disappointed and slightly confused.

The film thankfully saves itself from inadequacy due to the performances that the cast has brought to Baumbach's lovely characters. Nicole Kidman, who plays Margot, was wonderful in this; granted far from her best, but even her worst is better than any average actor could bring in their best days. Kidman has proven to the public that she is a serious actress and is willing to let herself be guided by a variety of filmmakers; her career spans from directors like Stanley Kubrick and Baz Luhrmann to Lars von Trier and Jonathan Glazer. This is a woman who can even bring layers to roles that are superficially and generically written. Margot is a complex individual and when under the hands of a different actress, the film may feel different. Jennifer Jason Leigh as Margot's sister, Pauline, was also strong in this, with multiple scenes demonstrating that Leigh has the ability to keep with Kidman's intensity and create internally chaotic but effective chemistry. Jack Black so far has only impressed me when under the hands of Richard Linklater, Bernie and School of Rock, but it shows here that he is also amazing when under Baumbach's direction. Black certainly acts out ragingly in a couple of scenes, but it feels different to his usual trademarks; it feels more composed and delivering a better comic timing.

Margot at the Wedding feels uninspired and aimless. Baumbach had written wonderful characters and bestowed upon a wonderful cast but fails to deliver a story that utilises them. The film on its own is not a failure, but standing against the rest of Baumbach's filmography shows just how much of a misfire Margot at the Wedding is.
November 15, 2014
Review In A Nutshell:

After seeing both Noah Baumbach's Frances Ha and The Squid and the Whale, I expected Margot at the Wedding to be well crafted and impacting film; especially given its amazing cast. Sadly the film does not meet those soaring expectations, but it did not completely underwhelm me either. There are certainly a number of positive elements in the film, and those were enough to keep me entertained and sticking it out with complete attention, all the way through.

The premise involves Margot coming back to her old home, along with her son Claude, to attend to her sister's wedding. Through this visit, issues and conflicting perspectives begin to arise, filling the atmosphere with tension and drama. I was immediately drawn into the characters of the film, regardless if their personalities come off as unlikeable. Margot's criticizing and "honest" nature makes her such a fascinating individual, and watching her affect the people around her, and without even a hint of understanding to the adverse effects of her actions. Though the film makes it clear that Margot is the damaged one, the rest of the characters are not as perfect as they seem. Pauline and Malcolm also carry their own set of baggage, but Baumbach does not pile it on to its audience, just as much as he does with Margot. As the film progresses, we see more of these characters as the constant clash of personalities forces them to act in ways that they normally wouldn't. The film also gives the time to explore Margot's relationship with her son and husband, and how her personality and her current situation affect them; I was constantly thinking about the structure and dynamic of her relationships, and why she is the way she is.

The film does not give away any easy answers about its characters, but it also fails to even address even the slightest on its purpose. Why does Baumbach want us to watch this story unfold? The previous two films I have seen from Baumbach demonstrated a sense purpose to their storylines; Frances Ha exploring the difficulties of pursuing passion over security, whilst also creating a sense of homage to the individuals that have inspired Baumbach in his filmmaking career. The Squid and the Whale explores the difficulties of divorce, told through the perspectives of each member of that once-nuclear family and honestly exposing personal aspects of Baumbach's own childhood. This film barely brings anything and because of that, I was left disappointed and slightly confused.

The film thankfully saves itself from inadequacy due to the performances that the cast has brought to Baumbach's lovely characters. Nicole Kidman, who plays Margot, was wonderful in this; granted far from her best, but even her worst is better than any average actor could bring in their best days. Kidman has proven to the public that she is a serious actress and is willing to let herself be guided by a variety of filmmakers; her career spans from directors like Stanley Kubrick and Baz Luhrmann to Lars von Trier and Jonathan Glazer. This is a woman who can even bring layers to roles that are superficially and generically written. Margot is a complex individual and when under the hands of a different actress, the film may feel different. Jennifer Jason Leigh as Margot's sister, Pauline, was also strong in this, with multiple scenes demonstrating that Leigh has the ability to keep with Kidman's intensity and create internally chaotic but effective chemistry. Jack Black so far has only impressed me when under the hands of Richard Linklater, Bernie and School of Rock, but it shows here that he is also amazing when under Baumbach's direction. Black certainly acts out ragingly in a couple of scenes, but it feels different to his usual trademarks; it feels more composed and delivering a better comic timing.

Margot at the Wedding feels uninspired and aimless. Baumbach had written wonderful characters and bestowed upon a wonderful cast but fails to deliver a story that utilises them. The film on its own is not a failure, but standing against the rest of Baumbach's filmography shows just how much of a misfire Margot at the Wedding is.
August 10, 2014
Typical Baumbach. Dark humour, unlikable characters, awkward dialogue. It's fantastic.
March 31, 2014
The filmic equivalent of drinking a bottle of wine and going through old family pictures.
½ February 8, 2014
Unpleasant and pessimistic picture, this one. Even with the cast's best efforts, there isn't a single sympathetic character to help us go through the movie.
December 10, 2013
Margot (Nicole Kidman) and her son Claude (Zane Paris) decide to visit her sister Pauline (Jennifer Jason Leigh) after she announces that she is marrying less-than-impressive Malcolm (Jack Black). In short order, the storm the sisters create leaves behind a a mess of thrashed relationships and exposed family secrets.

also stars John Turturro, Ciaran Hinds, Flora Cross and Halley Feiffer.

directed by Noah Baumbach.
Super Reviewer
½ December 6, 2013
I usually like Noah Baumbach's dialogue so much that I'm able to overlook his films' meandering pace and unlikeable characters. I could not forgive this one, however, both because the dialogue isn't as consistently sharp and because the overall structure is unmercifully dull. Though Jack Black's show-stealing performance reaffirms Baumbach's ability to maximize the humor he can get out of his misanthropes, the same is not true for the anti-hero played by Nicole Kidman. She plays her role efficiently, but gives absolutely no humanity to the part as Black does, and as Jeff Daniels and Ben Stiller have in the writer/director's other, better films.
November 25, 2013
I really dont get the arguments against the movie, i love it
½ October 14, 2013
This study of the dynamics between two sisters (Nicole Kidman and Jennifer Jason Leigh) and what their relationship means to one another is driven by the raw performances of the two leads in Noah Baumbach's naturalistic comedy drama. Kidman's complex Margot, a talented, neurotic writer, who is rightly described at one stage as a monster, engages in a beautifully written and performed manipulative, self-serving relationship with her young son Claude (an incredible Zane Pais); it's the sort of kinship that is worthy of psychoanalysis. The film is unfortunately let down a little by Jack Black in the final act, who fails to hit the mark when the material demands sensitivity; his emotional breakdown comes across a little too unintentionally humorous to be affective, but this is where Leigh, as his likable fiancée, carries the scene.

'Margot at the Wedding' is Baumbach's unsung masterstroke. It's not a perfect film, but the writer/director has constructed a fascinating piece with the perfectly cast Kidman, Leigh and Pais soaking up the screen, inviting the viewer into their world and refusing to let them leave.
½ September 26, 2013
ItÂs always been hard for me to get past just how dispicable Baumbachs characters always are. Also, is it just me or does he have some obsession with sexual dysfunction?
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