Maurice Reviews

  • Jun 30, 2020

    🏳️‍🌈 Based on E.M. Forster's novel and directed by James IVORY, it is British drama set in early 20th-century England that follows a young man trapped by the oppressiveness of Edwardian society who tries to come to terms with and accept his sexuality, after his lover rejects him. Ivory delivers one of his precious period dramas in his own signature style, which gives the movie an air of authenticity and the brilliant acting by the cast is outstanding, particularly one Hugh Grant, who was barely starting his film career. It examines the struggle of gay people at a time when being their true selves was extremely frowned upon and punishable by law. Difficult times indeed.

    🏳️‍🌈 Based on E.M. Forster's novel and directed by James IVORY, it is British drama set in early 20th-century England that follows a young man trapped by the oppressiveness of Edwardian society who tries to come to terms with and accept his sexuality, after his lover rejects him. Ivory delivers one of his precious period dramas in his own signature style, which gives the movie an air of authenticity and the brilliant acting by the cast is outstanding, particularly one Hugh Grant, who was barely starting his film career. It examines the struggle of gay people at a time when being their true selves was extremely frowned upon and punishable by law. Difficult times indeed.

  • May 12, 2020

    the atmosphere created in this movie by the actors, the music and the setting is immaculate.

    the atmosphere created in this movie by the actors, the music and the setting is immaculate.

  • Jun 20, 2019

    I was about to quit the movie until Alec showed up, that's when it gets better. Also best final any movie could ever have. !!

    I was about to quit the movie until Alec showed up, that's when it gets better. Also best final any movie could ever have. !!

  • Jun 06, 2019

    A coming-of-age film with a coming-of-change in the generation, adapt it slowly, like baby steps. Maurice Ivory has actually been to this road. And he will also receive an Oscar in future for an adaptation like such of Call Me By Your Name. The co-writer and director, James Ivory has walked on this same path, with only few changes and few turns taken differently. A brilliant piece of artistry that sculpts a strong resonant relationship in its first act, only to shift into the opposite direction that may or may not join the track but will surely tangle into each other vigorously. That's right, a film with such a pleasant bright colors brimmed across the frame, does get shook untidily in those last moments. Or maybe, they are still pretending in their well-pressed poised suits and just their diffident nature on expressing their views, for almost two hours has tamed us to be frightened of even long silences. Through James Ivory's I see it and the cinema doesn't get better than this. Watch him create arc by using known mandatory content that we use in everyday of our lives and never actually notice it in such a way up till now. That's why I have loved Ivory's world so much, a teapot grows elegant and emotions weigh incredibly in your perspective, you leave the screen with an awe and his opinion in your mind. Everything is in slow motion, everything waiting for you to be enjoyed. Hugh Grant as the lead has got the least leader-esque role and yet confused to the core, he walks or fumbles with genuine warmth despite of reaping questionable looks from us. James Wilby, on the other hand, has quite an empathetic cloak to put on, the mistakes are part of his character and peace, the cake he deserves. His paranoid impulsion is the key in understanding him, he will ask you about loads of things, Maurice, and will only account in the little guy living inside him, poking perpetually, turns out he is a good guy.

    A coming-of-age film with a coming-of-change in the generation, adapt it slowly, like baby steps. Maurice Ivory has actually been to this road. And he will also receive an Oscar in future for an adaptation like such of Call Me By Your Name. The co-writer and director, James Ivory has walked on this same path, with only few changes and few turns taken differently. A brilliant piece of artistry that sculpts a strong resonant relationship in its first act, only to shift into the opposite direction that may or may not join the track but will surely tangle into each other vigorously. That's right, a film with such a pleasant bright colors brimmed across the frame, does get shook untidily in those last moments. Or maybe, they are still pretending in their well-pressed poised suits and just their diffident nature on expressing their views, for almost two hours has tamed us to be frightened of even long silences. Through James Ivory's I see it and the cinema doesn't get better than this. Watch him create arc by using known mandatory content that we use in everyday of our lives and never actually notice it in such a way up till now. That's why I have loved Ivory's world so much, a teapot grows elegant and emotions weigh incredibly in your perspective, you leave the screen with an awe and his opinion in your mind. Everything is in slow motion, everything waiting for you to be enjoyed. Hugh Grant as the lead has got the least leader-esque role and yet confused to the core, he walks or fumbles with genuine warmth despite of reaping questionable looks from us. James Wilby, on the other hand, has quite an empathetic cloak to put on, the mistakes are part of his character and peace, the cake he deserves. His paranoid impulsion is the key in understanding him, he will ask you about loads of things, Maurice, and will only account in the little guy living inside him, poking perpetually, turns out he is a good guy.

  • Mar 03, 2019

    At a time when sexuality is policed - Maurice has got the odds stacked against him.

    At a time when sexuality is policed - Maurice has got the odds stacked against him.

  • Feb 24, 2019

    Maurice is a 1987 British romantic drama film based on the novel Maurice by E. M. Forster, directed by James Ivory. The settings, costumes, and cinematography are superb in the period drama. While the film is too long, and the scene-to-scene editing clumsy, the subject matter kept me intrigued and focused throughout. D

    Maurice is a 1987 British romantic drama film based on the novel Maurice by E. M. Forster, directed by James Ivory. The settings, costumes, and cinematography are superb in the period drama. While the film is too long, and the scene-to-scene editing clumsy, the subject matter kept me intrigued and focused throughout. D

  • Jan 14, 2019

    Written and set in the 1910s by E. M. Forster, it was revised a few times during his lifetime but only published posthumously in the 70s, and finally the big screen in 1987. Considered as daring and ahead of its time, both at the time of the book's and the film's initial release, in its depiction of a homosexual love affair between two men which began during university in Cambridge, this may not seem much nowadays as we have moved on from when such acts were deemed both illegal and immoral. However, as a period piece, I appreciate very much the way the film addresses the multi-faceted nature of being gay back then and the different reactions and paths a gay man faces consequentially. To that end, Maurice is a romantic but also realistic portrayal of the relationship between Maurice Hall (an initially hesitant but eventually blossoming James Wilby) and Clive Durham (with a very young Hugh Grant who, despite romcom stereotyping later in his career, shows great promise in laying down nuanced internal conflicts in his performance). The lavish setting and the strong collection of British thesps are to be expected from a Merchant/Ivory joint, as is the very leisurely pace (and the 2h 20m film duration), but there is also much to admire and cogitate upon, in particular, the tenderness shown on-screen and the contrasting depiction of Maurice's two relationships: the discrete but withholding one with Clive and the passionate and exposing one with Scudder, the gameskeeper played by a boyish Rupert Graves. Even though James Ivory's directing here feels dated, there is a clear line linking this with his recent work in Call Me By Your Name, which proves the universality of love and heartache, especially one that is a consequence of societal judgements.

    Written and set in the 1910s by E. M. Forster, it was revised a few times during his lifetime but only published posthumously in the 70s, and finally the big screen in 1987. Considered as daring and ahead of its time, both at the time of the book's and the film's initial release, in its depiction of a homosexual love affair between two men which began during university in Cambridge, this may not seem much nowadays as we have moved on from when such acts were deemed both illegal and immoral. However, as a period piece, I appreciate very much the way the film addresses the multi-faceted nature of being gay back then and the different reactions and paths a gay man faces consequentially. To that end, Maurice is a romantic but also realistic portrayal of the relationship between Maurice Hall (an initially hesitant but eventually blossoming James Wilby) and Clive Durham (with a very young Hugh Grant who, despite romcom stereotyping later in his career, shows great promise in laying down nuanced internal conflicts in his performance). The lavish setting and the strong collection of British thesps are to be expected from a Merchant/Ivory joint, as is the very leisurely pace (and the 2h 20m film duration), but there is also much to admire and cogitate upon, in particular, the tenderness shown on-screen and the contrasting depiction of Maurice's two relationships: the discrete but withholding one with Clive and the passionate and exposing one with Scudder, the gameskeeper played by a boyish Rupert Graves. Even though James Ivory's directing here feels dated, there is a clear line linking this with his recent work in Call Me By Your Name, which proves the universality of love and heartache, especially one that is a consequence of societal judgements.

  • Oct 08, 2018

    a love story between two very different personalities; james wilby plays the cheerful, floppy haired Maurice, and Hugh Grant plays Durham. one is more free spirited whereas the other wishes to conform, grow in an age appropriate manner, and enjoy what is it at hand and can be inherited, provided he stay in his lane. ;) incidentally, as a side note, it's disturbing to see how homosexuals were treated during the edwardian era.

    a love story between two very different personalities; james wilby plays the cheerful, floppy haired Maurice, and Hugh Grant plays Durham. one is more free spirited whereas the other wishes to conform, grow in an age appropriate manner, and enjoy what is it at hand and can be inherited, provided he stay in his lane. ;) incidentally, as a side note, it's disturbing to see how homosexuals were treated during the edwardian era.

  • Apr 03, 2018

    E.M. Forster's book was made into this movie, which was done very well. A very young Hugh Grant plays Clive. RT rated it 93%.

    E.M. Forster's book was made into this movie, which was done very well. A very young Hugh Grant plays Clive. RT rated it 93%.

  • Mar 31, 2018

    Slow. Ripe for a remake.

    Slow. Ripe for a remake.