Offside Reviews

  • Mar 21, 2019

    Not a great movie, lots of holes throughout the plot. Extremely misleading and various pointless scenes in which had no relevance to the movie what so ever. Critics who gave this a 94% shouldn't be reviewing movies

    Not a great movie, lots of holes throughout the plot. Extremely misleading and various pointless scenes in which had no relevance to the movie what so ever. Critics who gave this a 94% shouldn't be reviewing movies

  • Mar 08, 2017

    Con una grande abilità nel mantenere sullo stesso piano tutti i personaggi, questo film iraniano riesce a comunicare il messaggio con grande trasparenza e realismo. Anche se avrei preferito dei mezzi più intelligenti e meno diretti, l'anima che sta alla base del film è totalmente apprezzabile.

    Con una grande abilità nel mantenere sullo stesso piano tutti i personaggi, questo film iraniano riesce a comunicare il messaggio con grande trasparenza e realismo. Anche se avrei preferito dei mezzi più intelligenti e meno diretti, l'anima che sta alla base del film è totalmente apprezzabile.

  • Jan 04, 2017

    Director Jafar Panahi walks the line between fact and fiction with such skill that it is difficult to tell where fact ends and fiction begins. With Offside, he has made a film that is both a disparaging critique of the ban that prevents Iranian women from attending men's sporting events and therefore participating actively in national pride and a celebration of the women who dare to attend anyways. With parts of the film shot during an actual World Cup qualifying match, Offside feels like a documentary, even as the action that unfolds has to have been staged. You feel every moment with the women who have been caught sneaking into the game as they desperately try to catch glimpses of the match. It is amazing to watch their pride for their country, and their determination to show their nationalism, even as their country tries to prevent their participation.

    Director Jafar Panahi walks the line between fact and fiction with such skill that it is difficult to tell where fact ends and fiction begins. With Offside, he has made a film that is both a disparaging critique of the ban that prevents Iranian women from attending men's sporting events and therefore participating actively in national pride and a celebration of the women who dare to attend anyways. With parts of the film shot during an actual World Cup qualifying match, Offside feels like a documentary, even as the action that unfolds has to have been staged. You feel every moment with the women who have been caught sneaking into the game as they desperately try to catch glimpses of the match. It is amazing to watch their pride for their country, and their determination to show their nationalism, even as their country tries to prevent their participation.

  • Sanity Assassin ! Super Reviewer
    Oct 02, 2016

    not a comedy! slow burner. thought provoking and somewhat endearing. a touching ending.

    not a comedy! slow burner. thought provoking and somewhat endearing. a touching ending.

  • Mar 07, 2016

    This iranian movie is one of the most entertaining film on football worldcup!!

    This iranian movie is one of the most entertaining film on football worldcup!!

  • Dec 31, 2015

    Our Daily Free Stream: Jafar Panahi - Offside (engl. subt.). 2015, ein Triumph für den persischen Filmemacher Panahi. Nach seinem Berufsverbot als Regisseur, begann er "nicht"-Filme zu inszenieren, die er auch so benannte. Taxi bildet nun den vorläufigen Höhepunkt dieser Phase und Panahi macht aus Footage Politik! Deshalb hier sein witzigster Film, Offside, der auch ohne Genehmigung gemacht wurde: Eine kleine Einführung zum besseren Verständnis, denn im Iran haben die Mullahs den Frauen den Zutritt ins Fussball-Stadion verboten. Jafar Panahi, seines Zeichens Konter-Revolutionär, zieht daraus den Stoff für seine Komödie. Die oberste Liga im Iran heisst Qods, was soviel bedeutet wie das "befreite Jerusalem". Fussball ist eben doch Politik! Ein Vierteljahrhundert nach Chomeinis Revolution 1979 ist es für Frauen ein Sport geworden, dass Fussball-Verbot zu umgehen. Getarnt mit Baseball Kappen und eingehüllt in übergrosse Fahnen werden sie eingelassen: Als Männer. Offside wirkt wie eine illegale Doku, wir befinden uns inmitten der tobenden Menge, die Handkamera wackelt und versucht, das Geschehen einzufangen. Dahinter versteckt sich ein geschickt komponierter Spielfilm mit Laiendarstellern und einem Showdown! Die Frauen im Film sind gewitzt, die Männer Tölpel vom Lande. mit leichter Hand wird das Mullah Regime als Farce blossgestellt und ein alter Mann im Fanbus erklärt schliesslich den Zauber der Arena: Du kannst schreien, singen und sagen, was du willst. Gezeigt werden durfte Panahis Film allerdings nicht. mehr auf cinegeek.de

    Our Daily Free Stream: Jafar Panahi - Offside (engl. subt.). 2015, ein Triumph für den persischen Filmemacher Panahi. Nach seinem Berufsverbot als Regisseur, begann er "nicht"-Filme zu inszenieren, die er auch so benannte. Taxi bildet nun den vorläufigen Höhepunkt dieser Phase und Panahi macht aus Footage Politik! Deshalb hier sein witzigster Film, Offside, der auch ohne Genehmigung gemacht wurde: Eine kleine Einführung zum besseren Verständnis, denn im Iran haben die Mullahs den Frauen den Zutritt ins Fussball-Stadion verboten. Jafar Panahi, seines Zeichens Konter-Revolutionär, zieht daraus den Stoff für seine Komödie. Die oberste Liga im Iran heisst Qods, was soviel bedeutet wie das "befreite Jerusalem". Fussball ist eben doch Politik! Ein Vierteljahrhundert nach Chomeinis Revolution 1979 ist es für Frauen ein Sport geworden, dass Fussball-Verbot zu umgehen. Getarnt mit Baseball Kappen und eingehüllt in übergrosse Fahnen werden sie eingelassen: Als Männer. Offside wirkt wie eine illegale Doku, wir befinden uns inmitten der tobenden Menge, die Handkamera wackelt und versucht, das Geschehen einzufangen. Dahinter versteckt sich ein geschickt komponierter Spielfilm mit Laiendarstellern und einem Showdown! Die Frauen im Film sind gewitzt, die Männer Tölpel vom Lande. mit leichter Hand wird das Mullah Regime als Farce blossgestellt und ein alter Mann im Fanbus erklärt schliesslich den Zauber der Arena: Du kannst schreien, singen und sagen, was du willst. Gezeigt werden durfte Panahis Film allerdings nicht. mehr auf cinegeek.de

  • Aug 10, 2014

    educational watch- didn't realise that iranian women aren't allowed in stadiums to watch sports events. though this ban certainly wouldn't affect me if i was staying in tehran(!), it certainly is a WTF ban. mind boggling how draconian laws and ways are still around this day and age.

    educational watch- didn't realise that iranian women aren't allowed in stadiums to watch sports events. though this ban certainly wouldn't affect me if i was staying in tehran(!), it certainly is a WTF ban. mind boggling how draconian laws and ways are still around this day and age.

  • Dec 14, 2013

    This is a very small film. It takes place over a few hours during an Iran vs Bahrain soccer game. The story covers several women soccer fans who try to sneak into a men's only World Cup qualifying match. . I decided to see it because it had been very highly rated. But, the movie is over-rated. I suspect the high ratings came because of the nature of the topic. It is controversial in Arab/Persian/Islamic countries for women to participate freely in society as men can. The pc police were at work here. It was very modestly interesting/entertaining. You should pass on this one.

    This is a very small film. It takes place over a few hours during an Iran vs Bahrain soccer game. The story covers several women soccer fans who try to sneak into a men's only World Cup qualifying match. . I decided to see it because it had been very highly rated. But, the movie is over-rated. I suspect the high ratings came because of the nature of the topic. It is controversial in Arab/Persian/Islamic countries for women to participate freely in society as men can. The pc police were at work here. It was very modestly interesting/entertaining. You should pass on this one.

  • Nov 26, 2013

    In 1979, The Iranian Revolution began. Iranian people were protesting against Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah "king" of the Iranian monarchy. Iran became an Islamic Republic, and rules in cinema/art have been changed to be more strict and suitable for the Iranian conservative society. In Iran, the state had issued a law to prevent filmmakers to make films, talking about politics, religions, and sexual contact under any kind. Islamic law are not allowing filmmakers to add anything in the film that considered against the sharia Islamic law. Women in Iranian films cannot contact physically with men, all women must wear a hi-jab, and filmmakers can not use western music. These laws and the conditions made ??a lot of filmmakers in Iran express their content in a smart way, trying to avoid punishment from the Iranian government. However, some artists and directors were crossing the red lines and facing a hard time and many problems with the Iranian regime, such as Jafar Panahi. Through his film Offside, in 2006 Iranian director Jafar Panahi, makes one of best films ever made in Iran. The film about a long journey of young Iranian girls trying to enter one of the greater soccer matches of the national team of Iran. All the soccer matches inside Iran prevent women to be with the audience at the stadium. Only men can attend. During the significant soccer match between Iran and Bahrain, part of the World Cup tournaments, Panahi decides to film the girls who are trying to attend the stadium and support their national team. By using a small camera in order not to draw attention from the authorities. It is a hard to believe how Panahi have a plan to do the scenario in his film, but he did it in magnificent way. He wants us to send a message to all the over the world that tells us how women are suffering in his country. The message in his film is simply explaining what Iranian people go through with strict regime, and this film is not just about women rights, it is about achieving justice among society in Iranian. Not like other filmmakers, Panahi is one of few filmmakers inside Iran that are dis-likable from the Iranian government. Panahi with few others always show the true and the reality of the city of Tahhran through cinema. This film, brings a lot of attention from the international media about the difficulty that people in Iran face everyday from the Iranian regime. The strict Islamic laws as we can read in this film shows the lots lack of freedoms, absence of women rights, and most importantly no justice and gender inequality for the Iranian people. From this film, we find that Panahi is very intelligent in the way he criticizes the system in his country. In his camera we see a group of girls dealing with an injustice rules that allowed only men to watch a game. Via his movie, Panahi transfers the real image of what is really happening to the Iranian women. This film successfully gives me a lot of ideas about Iranians feelings, emotions, reactions, and with more than a hundreds of TV broadcasts and documentaries that have been made about Iran. An interview with Panahi, states "Many things in Iran always have certain problems. For each film that we make we have to think of creative ways of doing it. "if you can't get through the door then climb up through the window. So this is what we have to do to find a way of achieving our aims. For each film this method can only be used once, and for the next one obviously we have to find an alternative way of doing it"(open democracy). The film was admired by filmmakers around the world. Offside won a lot of awards in many film festivals, including the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. Film critics and journalists describe the film as one of the most important film in the history of Iranian cinema after the Islamic revolution. This film inspires many young filmmakers inside Iran to make films with high levels of bravery. Offside has great deal of impacts of the Middle East filmmaking. A few years after this movie released the Iranian regime put the director Jafar Panahi in jail for 5 years, and prevented him from making films for 25 years. During his period of stay in prison, Panahi made a film short called "This is not a film" through his Iphone, and was smuggled through inside a cake, a friend of his send the film to many film festivals around the world, including Cannes Film Festival.

    In 1979, The Iranian Revolution began. Iranian people were protesting against Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah "king" of the Iranian monarchy. Iran became an Islamic Republic, and rules in cinema/art have been changed to be more strict and suitable for the Iranian conservative society. In Iran, the state had issued a law to prevent filmmakers to make films, talking about politics, religions, and sexual contact under any kind. Islamic law are not allowing filmmakers to add anything in the film that considered against the sharia Islamic law. Women in Iranian films cannot contact physically with men, all women must wear a hi-jab, and filmmakers can not use western music. These laws and the conditions made ??a lot of filmmakers in Iran express their content in a smart way, trying to avoid punishment from the Iranian government. However, some artists and directors were crossing the red lines and facing a hard time and many problems with the Iranian regime, such as Jafar Panahi. Through his film Offside, in 2006 Iranian director Jafar Panahi, makes one of best films ever made in Iran. The film about a long journey of young Iranian girls trying to enter one of the greater soccer matches of the national team of Iran. All the soccer matches inside Iran prevent women to be with the audience at the stadium. Only men can attend. During the significant soccer match between Iran and Bahrain, part of the World Cup tournaments, Panahi decides to film the girls who are trying to attend the stadium and support their national team. By using a small camera in order not to draw attention from the authorities. It is a hard to believe how Panahi have a plan to do the scenario in his film, but he did it in magnificent way. He wants us to send a message to all the over the world that tells us how women are suffering in his country. The message in his film is simply explaining what Iranian people go through with strict regime, and this film is not just about women rights, it is about achieving justice among society in Iranian. Not like other filmmakers, Panahi is one of few filmmakers inside Iran that are dis-likable from the Iranian government. Panahi with few others always show the true and the reality of the city of Tahhran through cinema. This film, brings a lot of attention from the international media about the difficulty that people in Iran face everyday from the Iranian regime. The strict Islamic laws as we can read in this film shows the lots lack of freedoms, absence of women rights, and most importantly no justice and gender inequality for the Iranian people. From this film, we find that Panahi is very intelligent in the way he criticizes the system in his country. In his camera we see a group of girls dealing with an injustice rules that allowed only men to watch a game. Via his movie, Panahi transfers the real image of what is really happening to the Iranian women. This film successfully gives me a lot of ideas about Iranians feelings, emotions, reactions, and with more than a hundreds of TV broadcasts and documentaries that have been made about Iran. An interview with Panahi, states "Many things in Iran always have certain problems. For each film that we make we have to think of creative ways of doing it. "if you can't get through the door then climb up through the window. So this is what we have to do to find a way of achieving our aims. For each film this method can only be used once, and for the next one obviously we have to find an alternative way of doing it"(open democracy). The film was admired by filmmakers around the world. Offside won a lot of awards in many film festivals, including the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. Film critics and journalists describe the film as one of the most important film in the history of Iranian cinema after the Islamic revolution. This film inspires many young filmmakers inside Iran to make films with high levels of bravery. Offside has great deal of impacts of the Middle East filmmaking. A few years after this movie released the Iranian regime put the director Jafar Panahi in jail for 5 years, and prevented him from making films for 25 years. During his period of stay in prison, Panahi made a film short called "This is not a film" through his Iphone, and was smuggled through inside a cake, a friend of his send the film to many film festivals around the world, including Cannes Film Festival.

  • Nov 15, 2013

    Like 'The Circle', Offside is about sex discrimination in Iran. But golly! This is a different beast altogether from Jafar Panahi's earlier film. After the Islamic revolution football matches were one of the things barred to women. It became common for young women to disguise themselves as boys to watch games. Apparently the inspiration of the film was an incident when Panahi's daughter was refused entry to a football match (she snuck in anyway). Offside is set against the 2006 World Cup qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain in Azadi Stadium in Tehran. As the crowds enter the stadium we become aware that singly, young girls disguised as boys are attempting to slip pass guards on the look-out for such deviant behaviour. One by one, girls who are caught are placed in a holding area outside the stadium where they can hear, but not see the game. One of the young conscript soldier guarding the girls provides a commentary for them and a lively discussion about football and women's position in society follows - a lovely, gently mocking film, which nonetheless again questioned contemporary Iranian society. All set against the on-going match, of which Panahi used real footage. For the soldiers the girls are a bit of a nightmare: their faces are painted in the Iranian colours (apart from the girl who manages to see the first half disguised as a soldier), they smoke, they argue, and they know absolutely loads about football. But as the two groups get to know each other the girls are awarded some respect. Just as well, the only young lad on the bus taking the delinquents back into town is rude to the girls and one of them drops the nut on his face. There is a happy ending too, as the soldiers, the girls, and the country celebrate victory. After the film was made a group called the White Scarf Girls who protest at football matches in Iran (they are mentioned in the movie) began carrying banners saying "We don't want to be Offside". After many brushes with the Iranian authorities Panahi was arrested and imprisoned in March 2010. In December 2010 he was convicted for "assembly and colluding with the intention to commit crimes against the country's national security and propaganda against the Islamic Republic," and sentenced to six years imprisonment and a 20-year ban on making or directing any movies, writing screenplays, giving any form of interview with Iranian or foreign media. He was not allowed to leave Iran except for the Hajj or medical treatment Subsequently he has spent the time under house arrest, and despite the election of the 'relatively' liberal President Hassan Rouhani, there he remains still under the 20-year filmmaking ban, still not allowed to travel. But since the election several Iranian cultural figures have been released from detention and Iran's guild for filmmakers, the House of Cinema, has been re-opened - we should try to be optimistic. 'Offside' has glorious moments of farce. The nice young soldier who has to escort one of the girls to the gents' (there are obviously no ladies') makes her cover her face with a poster of an Iranian football star so that it is not obvious that she's a girl - she walks along with this male face-mask tied to her head. He first makes sure all men have gone; this is not that difficult because the match is on, but a few have to be hurried and an indignant couple of young men have to prevented from entering. By now she is hopping up and down: he instructs her to put her hand over her eyes before going in. From behind her male poster masks she wails in bafflement, "Why should I do that?" "So you can't read." "Read what?" "The walls" he announces. Let's hope that Hassan Rouhani doesn't follow the soldier's instruction.

    Like 'The Circle', Offside is about sex discrimination in Iran. But golly! This is a different beast altogether from Jafar Panahi's earlier film. After the Islamic revolution football matches were one of the things barred to women. It became common for young women to disguise themselves as boys to watch games. Apparently the inspiration of the film was an incident when Panahi's daughter was refused entry to a football match (she snuck in anyway). Offside is set against the 2006 World Cup qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain in Azadi Stadium in Tehran. As the crowds enter the stadium we become aware that singly, young girls disguised as boys are attempting to slip pass guards on the look-out for such deviant behaviour. One by one, girls who are caught are placed in a holding area outside the stadium where they can hear, but not see the game. One of the young conscript soldier guarding the girls provides a commentary for them and a lively discussion about football and women's position in society follows - a lovely, gently mocking film, which nonetheless again questioned contemporary Iranian society. All set against the on-going match, of which Panahi used real footage. For the soldiers the girls are a bit of a nightmare: their faces are painted in the Iranian colours (apart from the girl who manages to see the first half disguised as a soldier), they smoke, they argue, and they know absolutely loads about football. But as the two groups get to know each other the girls are awarded some respect. Just as well, the only young lad on the bus taking the delinquents back into town is rude to the girls and one of them drops the nut on his face. There is a happy ending too, as the soldiers, the girls, and the country celebrate victory. After the film was made a group called the White Scarf Girls who protest at football matches in Iran (they are mentioned in the movie) began carrying banners saying "We don't want to be Offside". After many brushes with the Iranian authorities Panahi was arrested and imprisoned in March 2010. In December 2010 he was convicted for "assembly and colluding with the intention to commit crimes against the country's national security and propaganda against the Islamic Republic," and sentenced to six years imprisonment and a 20-year ban on making or directing any movies, writing screenplays, giving any form of interview with Iranian or foreign media. He was not allowed to leave Iran except for the Hajj or medical treatment Subsequently he has spent the time under house arrest, and despite the election of the 'relatively' liberal President Hassan Rouhani, there he remains still under the 20-year filmmaking ban, still not allowed to travel. But since the election several Iranian cultural figures have been released from detention and Iran's guild for filmmakers, the House of Cinema, has been re-opened - we should try to be optimistic. 'Offside' has glorious moments of farce. The nice young soldier who has to escort one of the girls to the gents' (there are obviously no ladies') makes her cover her face with a poster of an Iranian football star so that it is not obvious that she's a girl - she walks along with this male face-mask tied to her head. He first makes sure all men have gone; this is not that difficult because the match is on, but a few have to be hurried and an indignant couple of young men have to prevented from entering. By now she is hopping up and down: he instructs her to put her hand over her eyes before going in. From behind her male poster masks she wails in bafflement, "Why should I do that?" "So you can't read." "Read what?" "The walls" he announces. Let's hope that Hassan Rouhani doesn't follow the soldier's instruction.