Paper Towns Reviews

  • Oct 18, 2020

    A No Heavy Tearjerker, But Still Searingly Relatable and Sentimental Coming on the heels of its commercially-successful predecessor, 'The Fault in Our Stars', PAPER TOWNS is no heavy tearjerker, but it echoes more affectionate and piercing sentiments, with its lighter, minimalist take of its recognizable subjects. The film follows Quentin (Nat Wolff) , or "Q" as he is more popularly called, a highschool boy who has been nursing an unrequited love for the girl living next door, Margo (Cara Delevigne) since childhood. Even after when they turn 12, when Margo suddenly becomes distant, "Q" never loses the affection, and it only becomes even stronger when one day she climbs again to his window, the way she did when they were still kids. The next events follow an eager "Q" savoring the moment as he escorts Margo in her series of "small revenge" against those she thinks have betrayed her, including her ex-boyfriend. But the levitating moment would only last overnight, because the next day, the ever mystifying Margo, disappears. Mining on the same overly familiar material that dwells on both coming-of-age and teenage romance territories, PAPER TOWNS pulls off two easily-recognizable efforts: maintaining 'The Fault's charm, while toning down its tragic notions. The latter of which, yields a more tangible and heartwarming result, capable of conjuring a lasting tug at the heartstrings. The credit for this goes to its equally-charming yet capable actors, both of whom teeming with fresh and enigmatic likability. It will also sound unforgivable to never pay regard to the film's brilliant screenwriters who manage to cleverly highlight this extremely familiar highschool tale's stronger and more relatable sentiments, genuinely and sincerely enough, to bend fragile emotions with crippling capacity. "Q"'s road trip in finding Margo represents a bigger journey with far wider scope and meaning, and it comes across as a process of personal exploration that unknowingly liberates one self, toward finding the deeper sense of their existence. Hardly that the questions thrown get resolved, but the charming and sincere take of its proceedings, will ultimately make the narrative arrive to a satisfying conclusion. This doesn't mean it's able to satisfy its own queries, but the resolution delivered are nonetheless, reliable and honest. PAPER TOWNS will come across as a witty, yet touching case of a 'lost and found'. Much of it is spent in searching for the 'lost', a liberating process that frees its seekers from every question that unfolds in the wake of a previous other, but the 'found', though never really answers any of the previous questions, will deliver a surprisingly satisfying, and never less of a rewarding, answer.

    A No Heavy Tearjerker, But Still Searingly Relatable and Sentimental Coming on the heels of its commercially-successful predecessor, 'The Fault in Our Stars', PAPER TOWNS is no heavy tearjerker, but it echoes more affectionate and piercing sentiments, with its lighter, minimalist take of its recognizable subjects. The film follows Quentin (Nat Wolff) , or "Q" as he is more popularly called, a highschool boy who has been nursing an unrequited love for the girl living next door, Margo (Cara Delevigne) since childhood. Even after when they turn 12, when Margo suddenly becomes distant, "Q" never loses the affection, and it only becomes even stronger when one day she climbs again to his window, the way she did when they were still kids. The next events follow an eager "Q" savoring the moment as he escorts Margo in her series of "small revenge" against those she thinks have betrayed her, including her ex-boyfriend. But the levitating moment would only last overnight, because the next day, the ever mystifying Margo, disappears. Mining on the same overly familiar material that dwells on both coming-of-age and teenage romance territories, PAPER TOWNS pulls off two easily-recognizable efforts: maintaining 'The Fault's charm, while toning down its tragic notions. The latter of which, yields a more tangible and heartwarming result, capable of conjuring a lasting tug at the heartstrings. The credit for this goes to its equally-charming yet capable actors, both of whom teeming with fresh and enigmatic likability. It will also sound unforgivable to never pay regard to the film's brilliant screenwriters who manage to cleverly highlight this extremely familiar highschool tale's stronger and more relatable sentiments, genuinely and sincerely enough, to bend fragile emotions with crippling capacity. "Q"'s road trip in finding Margo represents a bigger journey with far wider scope and meaning, and it comes across as a process of personal exploration that unknowingly liberates one self, toward finding the deeper sense of their existence. Hardly that the questions thrown get resolved, but the charming and sincere take of its proceedings, will ultimately make the narrative arrive to a satisfying conclusion. This doesn't mean it's able to satisfy its own queries, but the resolution delivered are nonetheless, reliable and honest. PAPER TOWNS will come across as a witty, yet touching case of a 'lost and found'. Much of it is spent in searching for the 'lost', a liberating process that frees its seekers from every question that unfolds in the wake of a previous other, but the 'found', though never really answers any of the previous questions, will deliver a surprisingly satisfying, and never less of a rewarding, answer.

  • Aug 30, 2020

    Paper Towns has solid acting, thoughtful direction, likable characters and an enjoyable mystery but coming off the heels of the last John Green movie, The Fault in Our Stars, the more cliched narrative and generic script become much more blatant by comparison, making this a nice movie to watch that unfortunately fails to stand out from other teen movies.

    Paper Towns has solid acting, thoughtful direction, likable characters and an enjoyable mystery but coming off the heels of the last John Green movie, The Fault in Our Stars, the more cliched narrative and generic script become much more blatant by comparison, making this a nice movie to watch that unfortunately fails to stand out from other teen movies.

  • Aug 21, 2020

    This movie was quite a displeasure to watch. I read the book, and I enjoyed it, but the design choices for this movie left something to be desired. This movie has too much and too little of everything a movie needs. The actually could have been pretty good, if it weren't for the people who made this movie cutting out major details that John Green had put in the book. However, they probably cut out much of this stuff because the movie was already unbearably long with almost nothing happening on the screen to really grab or warrant our attention for nearly an hour and ten minutes of the film. So much potential, so few good things happening on the screen.

    This movie was quite a displeasure to watch. I read the book, and I enjoyed it, but the design choices for this movie left something to be desired. This movie has too much and too little of everything a movie needs. The actually could have been pretty good, if it weren't for the people who made this movie cutting out major details that John Green had put in the book. However, they probably cut out much of this stuff because the movie was already unbearably long with almost nothing happening on the screen to really grab or warrant our attention for nearly an hour and ten minutes of the film. So much potential, so few good things happening on the screen.

  • Jul 10, 2020

    Paper Towns is a pretty generic movie and I didn't like it very much. The ending is such a letdown and rather anticlimactic and I don't know what the Quentin sees in Margo other than the fact that Margo is attractive but Margo is kind of a bad person. Like she ignores him for a decade and then breaks into his house just to take his car. And then she disappears and they go on this adventure to find her and once they find her she's all like I was just sending those clues to tell you I was fine which is so ridiculously stupid that it's frustrating. And then the movie kind of ends. It's just a pointless waste of time. Idk if the book is like this but the movie was very frustrating especially the end and it kind of ruined the whole movie for me

    Paper Towns is a pretty generic movie and I didn't like it very much. The ending is such a letdown and rather anticlimactic and I don't know what the Quentin sees in Margo other than the fact that Margo is attractive but Margo is kind of a bad person. Like she ignores him for a decade and then breaks into his house just to take his car. And then she disappears and they go on this adventure to find her and once they find her she's all like I was just sending those clues to tell you I was fine which is so ridiculously stupid that it's frustrating. And then the movie kind of ends. It's just a pointless waste of time. Idk if the book is like this but the movie was very frustrating especially the end and it kind of ruined the whole movie for me

  • Jun 14, 2020

    Poor story line. Got some cynical messed up girl running away and her friends try to find her. When found, she's like "what are you doing here?" Massive let down ending. Wasted an hour and 50 minutes of my life watching this ugly girl.

    Poor story line. Got some cynical messed up girl running away and her friends try to find her. When found, she's like "what are you doing here?" Massive let down ending. Wasted an hour and 50 minutes of my life watching this ugly girl.

  • Jun 06, 2020

    Nothing special about this movie. Just a waste of time.

    Nothing special about this movie. Just a waste of time.

  • Jun 04, 2020

    All the heart and charm of a good coming-of-age rom com -- distinct enough to feel fresh in a hackneyed genre

    All the heart and charm of a good coming-of-age rom com -- distinct enough to feel fresh in a hackneyed genre

  • May 24, 2020

    I Feels sad while Smiling ,i have a good time with Every minute ,This Film is Memorable ,i will never forget First Feeling while i watching this Film It's a wonderful feeling. ps.my Rewive not Deep Enought But one thing that i can told you is "Try to watch it once in a lifetime"

    I Feels sad while Smiling ,i have a good time with Every minute ,This Film is Memorable ,i will never forget First Feeling while i watching this Film It's a wonderful feeling. ps.my Rewive not Deep Enought But one thing that i can told you is "Try to watch it once in a lifetime"

  • Apr 10, 2020

    Screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber who collaborated on the wonderfully quirky (500) Days Of Summer and Fault In Our Stars, do a great job at bringing their characters to life. With the help of the direction from Jake Schreier, there's enough charming moments to keep one invested with the characters' journey. Like all coming-of-age flicks, Paper Towns focuses less on the destination, but more of the journey getting their. Nat Wolff is endlessly charming as Quentin. Echoing a hybrid of Tom Cruise in Risky Business and John Cusack in Say Anything. Shy and awkward, he's a level headed teen who's missed out on many rebellious rites of passage of being a teenager. Cara Delevingne is naturally enigmatic as Margo. The fashion model has very little screen time in comparison to her co-stars. However, with her natural beauty she's a destined heartbreaker. Her acting abilities occasionally suffer, but it's easily forgiven seeing as it's her first major role in a feature. Personally, I have not read John Green's original novel, but I've always had a guilty pleasure for coming-of-age tales. Although Paper Towns may not resonate with some as much as John Hughes classic. It's sweetly romantic and sentimental, yet remains grounded in reality. If I had one issue is that the road trip from Florida to New York ended too abruptly. It would have been nice to add more depth to the character's relationships. However, it's the kind of teen movie that will speak to today's generation.

    Screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber who collaborated on the wonderfully quirky (500) Days Of Summer and Fault In Our Stars, do a great job at bringing their characters to life. With the help of the direction from Jake Schreier, there's enough charming moments to keep one invested with the characters' journey. Like all coming-of-age flicks, Paper Towns focuses less on the destination, but more of the journey getting their. Nat Wolff is endlessly charming as Quentin. Echoing a hybrid of Tom Cruise in Risky Business and John Cusack in Say Anything. Shy and awkward, he's a level headed teen who's missed out on many rebellious rites of passage of being a teenager. Cara Delevingne is naturally enigmatic as Margo. The fashion model has very little screen time in comparison to her co-stars. However, with her natural beauty she's a destined heartbreaker. Her acting abilities occasionally suffer, but it's easily forgiven seeing as it's her first major role in a feature. Personally, I have not read John Green's original novel, but I've always had a guilty pleasure for coming-of-age tales. Although Paper Towns may not resonate with some as much as John Hughes classic. It's sweetly romantic and sentimental, yet remains grounded in reality. If I had one issue is that the road trip from Florida to New York ended too abruptly. It would have been nice to add more depth to the character's relationships. However, it's the kind of teen movie that will speak to today's generation.

  • Feb 26, 2020

    I liked the movie's humor and themes. But where's the romantic finale?

    I liked the movie's humor and themes. But where's the romantic finale?