Philadelphia Reviews

  • May 05, 2019

    The movie succeeds in telling how unfair soceity is toward our LGBTQ+ brothers and sisters, and what we can do to help serve justice for them --- be kind. A very moving film.

    The movie succeeds in telling how unfair soceity is toward our LGBTQ+ brothers and sisters, and what we can do to help serve justice for them --- be kind. A very moving film.

  • Mar 15, 2019

    Change takes time, and fear can't stand the test of time.

    Change takes time, and fear can't stand the test of time.

  • Mar 01, 2019

    More Than A Courtroom Drama. Philadelphia Demme is definitely armed with a sharp script but is unfortunately short on execution. With eerie camera work and enabling a cheesy environment in a professional work environment, this method is off putting and disenchanting the powerful words Ron Nyswaner; the writer, wrote. And this is how powerful his words are, for despite of having these many flaws, the film is one big powerhouse of drama. With monologues or speeches or even conversation drawn in for satire that are itself free from any whatsoever strings of the storyline. Personally, among multiple such sequences, I connected the most when Andrew (Tom Hanks) gets lost on listening the Opera and describing the lyrics to Joe (Denzel Washington) with body language so flamboyant that you melt away in his performance. And this is film's major asset; the cast. With A list actors such as Hanks and Washington sharing the screen, there is an elevation in each scene as these two charge heavily on to others. Washington has a powerful three dimensional character to play, primarily because it struggles with his own issues along with a case that he is fighting which is about the very personal conflicts. Hanks is on the softer side of the door, he is mostly incapable of taking charge with power. He is a pure magic while seducing you, with a slow speech and low voice, he is wiser than others and also humbler. The courtroom drama, as Washington says before the trial begins, is not your usual tear jerking melodrama but a long hard boxing match where you are not going to win by a knockout punch. Philadelphia is exactly as the title song states, advanced and also gullible on the acceptance logistics, either way, this cast lives up to the hype they come up with; style and excellence.

    More Than A Courtroom Drama. Philadelphia Demme is definitely armed with a sharp script but is unfortunately short on execution. With eerie camera work and enabling a cheesy environment in a professional work environment, this method is off putting and disenchanting the powerful words Ron Nyswaner; the writer, wrote. And this is how powerful his words are, for despite of having these many flaws, the film is one big powerhouse of drama. With monologues or speeches or even conversation drawn in for satire that are itself free from any whatsoever strings of the storyline. Personally, among multiple such sequences, I connected the most when Andrew (Tom Hanks) gets lost on listening the Opera and describing the lyrics to Joe (Denzel Washington) with body language so flamboyant that you melt away in his performance. And this is film's major asset; the cast. With A list actors such as Hanks and Washington sharing the screen, there is an elevation in each scene as these two charge heavily on to others. Washington has a powerful three dimensional character to play, primarily because it struggles with his own issues along with a case that he is fighting which is about the very personal conflicts. Hanks is on the softer side of the door, he is mostly incapable of taking charge with power. He is a pure magic while seducing you, with a slow speech and low voice, he is wiser than others and also humbler. The courtroom drama, as Washington says before the trial begins, is not your usual tear jerking melodrama but a long hard boxing match where you are not going to win by a knockout punch. Philadelphia is exactly as the title song states, advanced and also gullible on the acceptance logistics, either way, this cast lives up to the hype they come up with; style and excellence.

  • Feb 02, 2019

    The best, GREATEST inspiring courtroom movie ever made! With the best movie character ever portrayed: Tom Hanks as Andrew Beckett! And 2 of the best movie songs ever sung: La Mamma Morta and Streets of Philadelphia!

    The best, GREATEST inspiring courtroom movie ever made! With the best movie character ever portrayed: Tom Hanks as Andrew Beckett! And 2 of the best movie songs ever sung: La Mamma Morta and Streets of Philadelphia!

  • Feb 01, 2019

    I barely could get to half movie. This was a great occasion thrown away.

    I barely could get to half movie. This was a great occasion thrown away.

  • Jan 13, 2019

    So ridiculously heavy handed with the AIDs crisis bullshit. Just too much for me. I hate it.

    So ridiculously heavy handed with the AIDs crisis bullshit. Just too much for me. I hate it.

  • Jan 11, 2019

    Returning to Philadelphia more than 25 years later is like digging up a depressing time capsule. That startling reminder of how rampant and even acceptable homophobia and AIDS panic was in our culture is not fun. It makes you both embarrassed that people used to behave in this way, and frustrated that we are still fighting the same battles among ourselves now in slightly different ways. It’s great that Tom Hanks (also known as America’s Dad) is the one who takes on the lead role because it’s almost impossible to dislike him. He makes you care for the character, and not just because we watch his health degrade on screen. However, Denzel Washington didn’t quite fit the role for this film. The script wants us to think of him as an ambulance-chasing lawyer, and he presents himself as too distinguished and skilled to be that type of character. I did appreciate how he became the change character of the film, but I wish we saw more of him softening towards homosexuals so we could appreciate why he changed his attitude. My biggest struggle with Philadelphia is that it suffers from an identity crisis. The movie tells a compelling story, and has many elements that I appreciate, but it never feels like they commit to what kind of movie they are trying to make. There are times when it feels like this is going to be a courtroom drama, and I love those sections, but they leave out many aspects that you’d expect in that type of movie. It lacks some of the dramatic thrust that I anticipate in a courtroom film, and the verdict seems extreme based on the parts of the trial we see. Other times it feels like a statement film that is trying to promote tolerance and understanding of the AIDS virus, but that also is not explored to a satisfying extent. They don’t spend much time looking at the negative assumptions people make about contracting HIV (although it is implied a few times,) and as I discussed before they don’t detail the motives that cause a bigot to change his tune. Philadelphia is not a bad or broken film, but with a bit more focus I think it could be timeless and great.

    Returning to Philadelphia more than 25 years later is like digging up a depressing time capsule. That startling reminder of how rampant and even acceptable homophobia and AIDS panic was in our culture is not fun. It makes you both embarrassed that people used to behave in this way, and frustrated that we are still fighting the same battles among ourselves now in slightly different ways. It’s great that Tom Hanks (also known as America’s Dad) is the one who takes on the lead role because it’s almost impossible to dislike him. He makes you care for the character, and not just because we watch his health degrade on screen. However, Denzel Washington didn’t quite fit the role for this film. The script wants us to think of him as an ambulance-chasing lawyer, and he presents himself as too distinguished and skilled to be that type of character. I did appreciate how he became the change character of the film, but I wish we saw more of him softening towards homosexuals so we could appreciate why he changed his attitude. My biggest struggle with Philadelphia is that it suffers from an identity crisis. The movie tells a compelling story, and has many elements that I appreciate, but it never feels like they commit to what kind of movie they are trying to make. There are times when it feels like this is going to be a courtroom drama, and I love those sections, but they leave out many aspects that you’d expect in that type of movie. It lacks some of the dramatic thrust that I anticipate in a courtroom film, and the verdict seems extreme based on the parts of the trial we see. Other times it feels like a statement film that is trying to promote tolerance and understanding of the AIDS virus, but that also is not explored to a satisfying extent. They don’t spend much time looking at the negative assumptions people make about contracting HIV (although it is implied a few times,) and as I discussed before they don’t detail the motives that cause a bigot to change his tune. Philadelphia is not a bad or broken film, but with a bit more focus I think it could be timeless and great.

  • Sep 03, 2018

    The worst film i have ever seen

    The worst film i have ever seen

  • Jun 21, 2018

    Philadelphia is a 1993 American drama film directed by Jonathan Demme. 1001

    Philadelphia is a 1993 American drama film directed by Jonathan Demme. 1001

  • May 07, 2018

    One of the best movies with Denzil Washington

    One of the best movies with Denzil Washington