Run Lola Run - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Run Lola Run Reviews

Page 1 of 363
June 12, 2018
About my favourite film of all time. Fantastic original story, told beautifully.
June 3, 2018
6/10 weird but simple
April 17, 2018
The film Run Lola Run is about a character, Lola, who needs to find 100,000 Deutsche marks in 20 minutes to save her boyfriend's life. The film is cut into three 20 minute missions, and in each mission, Lola decides to do certain things differently. This film primarily speaks about the concept of time and challenges the reality of this concept through Lola's character. The fact that it draws the viewer's attention to the means of production through symbolism, transgression of boundaries, and false consciousness, is what makes the film stand out.
In the beginning of the film, the animation of Lola running as fast as she can and breaking obstacles while constantly being surrounded by clocks, illustrates that life is a game. We are constantly repeating our day to day routine with minor changes, and time is always running the same exact way. So, we, humans, are imprisoned by time in some space in life and the events that take place go round and round, except that they go in spirals and not in circles. Therefore, the choices we make at a certain time influences the future or rearranges it in some way, affecting what stages we reach to in life, much like the butterfly effect. As a viewer watching the film, you feel as though Lola has been given much more than just 20 minutes. It gives a perception that Lola manipulates time or tries to create it, which specifically makes the film transgress the boundaries of time in the realistic world.
Lola's physical appearance in the beginning of the film leads us to think that she is careless, but that perspective changes when the film shows that she wholeheartedly cares and is actually full of intelligence. This is meant by the director to address the false consciousness within the viewers. Moreover, in the first two attempts, Lola always chooses to seek help from her father figure, but on the third attempt she never asks anyone for help, especially a man. Only then does she succeed in winning the money all by herself. This cinematic idea is demystifying the fact that one, a female in particular, does not need a male figure to succeed in life. Therefore, the false consciousness of society's perspective on this matter is challenged by the director through her final attempt.
The symbolism in this film is very obvious, in which it metaphorically speaks to the audience. Lola's character is associated with red; her hair is red, her telephone is red, and her personality represents the color red. Red is the color of her desperation and passion to accomplish her 'mission' and stick by her promise to her boyfriend Manni. It is also the color that shows her fierceness or wildness. Red is also the color of 'emergency' in the film. It is evident in the scene where Lola runs alongside the emergency car, that similar to the driver of the car, Lola also has an emergency. Spirals are also a repetitive theme in the film that emphasizes the loop we go through in life, which is constricted by time.
The fast paced extra diegetic sounds where Lola runs emphasizes on the fact that time is running and she has an emergency. It further allows the transfer of boundaries in which the audience can feel the anxiety that Lola feels. A song called "Believe" by Franka Potente is played in all the three times Lola runs. The lyrics of the song contradict how Lola is framed in the film. The song repeats "I don't believe in promise, I don't believe in chance... I don't believe in panic, I don't believe in fear." However, while Lola runs, she delivers the impression that she does believe in promise and chance, and that she is in panic and fear at the same time. She promises Manni that she will find the money, she takes the chance of gambling in the casino, and throughout it all she is anxious and fearful about the future. This ironic distance between her thoughts and her actions creates another form of false consciousness, in which she knows that she does not believe, but she does not want to know that she does not believe, so she does not know to be able to get through her attempts and 'win the game'.
Run Lola Run is also a film in between modernism and post-modernism. It follows a modern world, in a sense that it portrays how people are constantly pressured by time without exaggeration as her 20-minute attempt in each of the three times is actually 20 minutes long in the film, so the audience is able to feel her anxiety and take her place in the film. It can also be seen as a post-modern world, where Lola gets to stop and repeat time to go back to the same exact setting and make new, different choices. This is something beyond our capabilities, which gives the film its element of the supernatural world. Not only does the film fulfill the audience's excitement from the beginning to the end, but it also succeeds in generating innovative approaches towards time.
April 17, 2018
The film Run Lola Run is about a character, Lola, who needs to find 100,000 Deutsche marks in 20 minutes to save her boyfriend's life. The film is cut into three 20 minute missions, and in each mission, Lola decides to do certain things differently. This film primarily speaks about the concept of time and challenges the reality of this concept through Lola's character. The fact that it draws the viewer's attention to the means of production through symbolism, transgression of boundaries, and false consciousness, is what makes the film stand out.
In the beginning of the film, the animation of Lola running as fast as she can and breaking obstacles while constantly being surrounded by clocks, illustrates that life is a game. We are constantly repeating our day to day routine with minor changes, and time is always running the same exact way. So, we, humans, are imprisoned by time in some space in life and the events that take place go round and round, except that they go in spirals and not in circles. Therefore, the choices we make at a certain time influences the future or rearranges it in some way, affecting what stages we reach to in life, much like the butterfly effect. As a viewer watching the film, you feel as though Lola has been given much more than just 20 minutes. It gives a perception that Lola manipulates time or tries to create it, which specifically makes the film transgress the boundaries of time in the realistic world.
Lola's physical appearance in the beginning of the film leads us to think that she is careless, but that perspective changes when the film shows that she wholeheartedly cares and is actually full of intelligence. This is meant by the director to address the false consciousness within the viewers. Moreover, in the first two attempts, Lola always chooses to seek help from her father figure, but on the third attempt she never asks anyone for help, especially a man. Only then does she succeed in winning the money all by herself. This cinematic idea is demystifying the fact that one, a female in particular, does not need a male figure to succeed in life. Therefore, the false consciousness of society's perspective on this matter is challenged by the director through her final attempt.
The symbolism in this film is very obvious, in which it metaphorically speaks to the audience. Lola's character is associated with red; her hair is red, her telephone is red, and her personality represents the color red. Red is the color of her desperation and passion to accomplish her 'mission' and stick by her promise to her boyfriend Manni. It is also the color that shows her fierceness or wildness. Red is also the color of 'emergency' in the film. It is evident in the scene where Lola runs alongside the emergency car, that similar to the driver of the car, Lola also has an emergency. Spirals are also a repetitive theme in the film that emphasizes the loop we go through in life, which is constricted by time.
The fast paced extra diegetic sounds where Lola runs emphasizes on the fact that time is running and she has an emergency. It further allows the transfer of boundaries in which the audience can feel the anxiety that Lola feels. A song called "Believe" by Franka Potente is played in all the three times Lola runs. The lyrics of the song contradict how Lola is framed in the film. The song repeats "I don't believe in promise, I don't believe in chance... I don't believe in panic, I don't believe in fear." However, while Lola runs, she delivers the impression that she does believe in promise and chance, and that she is in panic and fear at the same time. She promises Manni that she will find the money, she takes the chance of gambling in the casino, and throughout it all she is anxious and fearful about the future. This ironic distance between her thoughts and her actions creates another form of false consciousness, in which she knows that she does not believe, but she does not want to know that she does not believe, so she does not know to be able to get through her attempts and 'win the game'.
Run Lola Run is also a film in between modernism and post-modernism. It follows a modern world, in a sense that it portrays how people are constantly pressured by time without exaggeration as her 20-minute attempt in each of the three times is actually 20 minutes long in the film, so the audience is able to feel her anxiety and take her place in the film. It can also be seen as a post-modern world, where Lola gets to stop and repeat time to go back to the same exact setting and make new, different choices. This is something beyond our capabilities, which gives the film its element of the supernatural world. Not only does the film fulfill the audience's excitement from the beginning to the end, but it also succeeds in generating innovative approaches towards time.
April 17, 2018
Run Lola Run: The Bigger Picture is Hidden within the Tiny Details

The film Run Lola Run is about a girl that has 20 minutes to help her boyfriend with a predicament that will most likely cause him his life. The film is an artistic masterpiece that transgresses the architectures of containment in such an interesting way. The director Tom Tykwer was successful at capturing the imprisonment of time that the main character Lola was experiencing throughout the film. The pattern portrayed throughout the film gives the viewer a sense of depth that is not always presented to the same extent in many films. This was achieved through the use of sound, color, editing and the various camera angles.
The opening scene of the film shows a panoramic shot of the city from above and quickly zooms into Lola's apartment complex. We follow the camera as it quickly aims toward the red telephone ringing, all while hearing the sound of upbeat techno music that gives the viewer a sense of urgency. The crane shot which proceeds to zoom in is a way to portray the main event of the film, a technique to show the object of most importance. Even the color of the telephone is significant, which is identical to the color of Lola's hair. The color red is noteworthy as it was intentionally displayed in an attempt to give the viewer an indication of passion, anger, emergency, love and worry.
Lola answers the phone and the director uses the same technique of shifting the camera to her boyfriend Manni in a similar fast paced zooming as seen earlier. This simply adds to the effect and feeling of urgency that is displayed time and time again throughout the film. The director intensifies the anxiety of the situation by abruptly shifting the shots to both Lola and Manni as they speak during their telephone conversation. Manni informs Lola that he has lost the money he was supposed to deliver to a drug dealer and he will most likely be killed by him if he does not deliver the 100,000 marks within 20 minutes. They end their telephone conversation and the techno music intensifies as Lola turns to the clock to see the time she has left to help her boyfriend. Simultaneously, we get flashes of her television screen showing a set of dominos swiftly toppling over. This is a brilliant foreshadowing of the films main theme of how every action has a reaction that leads to a specific outcome. It highlights the fact that everything is linked together, perfectly representing how the butterfly effect takes place and how every miniscule encounter can have a major impact on an individual's timeline. This is displayed when Lola passes by the side characters in the film and we are shown millisecond clips of their fore coming futures. The way the director chose to show us the future was portrayed in such an artistic and simple way that gave us the solid visual of the effect that would take place in their lives, and this was achieved in mere seconds through time lapse shots.
While the dominos are toppling on the television screen Lola is seen to be shuffling through her mind desperately thinking of a person to seek help from. We see clips of the people Lola knows flash through her mind and finally fall on the image of her father, she utters the word papa and rushes out the door. Interestingly the image of her father comes to life and he gazes at her as she runs out the door then shakes his head in disapproval. The director is giving the viewer a hint of what is to come later in the film. Since later on in the film it is revealed that he is not her biological father after all and is unwilling to help her with her dilemma.
The movie is constantly engaging the viewer and keeping them at the edge of their seat by using the many techniques shown in the film. In many scenes we are shown clocks to express the urgency of time and a constant reminder of how Lola is running out of time to complete her task. Lola repeated the task three times and in each round there are slight variations in the details of her journey. For example, the third and final round is when Lola did not cross between the group of nuns, however, the first two rounds she ran right in-between the group of nuns. This is a very interesting small detail that the director added, which is an unconscious indication of Lola's faith in accomplishing her task. Moreover, during the final round the first side character Lola runs past is shown through the time lapse clips to have a future in which she enters into the faith and becomes religious. This only adds to the signs that Lola has developed faith in her mission for the last round.
Overall, I found the film to be visually appealing and the plot to be very entertaining. I appreciated the subtle hints that connected the small encounters to the bigger picture and brought the story together. The beginning of the film starts with a clip of many people rushing to their everyday lives as it focuses on some of the characters shown in the film. This represents how many people you can cross by throughout your life without even realizing how that may affect you or them in the future and this is basically what the film was representing all along. Every small difference Lola made in each one of her three journeys not only affected her outcome, but also it is quite obvious that every other person in the film that interacted with Lola had a different outcome each time, no matter how minor the interaction was. The film helps us appreciate and be aware of the strangers we pass by and how the tiniest interaction could have a major effect on their day or even their life.
April 17, 2018
Run Lola Run: A World Without Boundaries
"Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going? How do we know what we think we know? Why do we believe anything at all?" These are the questions Tom Tykwer poses to the viewer in the beginning of his 1998 film, Run Lola Run, to set up a postmodern world that transgresses temporal and social architectures of confinement. The film has a game-like feel to it, with Lola as the player and the various men in the game, including Lola's father and her boyfriend, Manni, as the source of obstacles in the game. The 'game' begins when Lola gets a phone call from Manni, who desperately needs help. Earlier in the day, Manni loses a bag containing a hundred thousand German marks, which to Manni's despair, belongs to his murderous drug-dealer boss who needs the money in exactly twenty minutes. Driven by her love for Manni, Lola races against time to gather the money but gets shot on her first attempt. So, she goes back to where she started, but wiser than before, and tries again and fails again and then tries again and succeeds. Even though every attempt is essentially the same, a minor change in Lola's timing of her runs leads to three different outcomes, the last of which is a success.
These different outcomes that result from the same story reflect a fundamental consequence of postmodernism; there is no "singular truth" but a "multiplicity of truths" and "different perspectives" (McDonald). Through the film's plot that often switches between animation and reality; game and non-game, Tykwer makes it harder to identify what is true. And the creative mise-en-scene and energetic soundtracks used in the film further blur the line between real and unreal, which effectively illustrates a postmodern world in which "no definite terms, boundaries, or absolute truths exist" (Niles). Therefore, by using elements of form and content, Tykwer creates a postmodern world that allows him to transgress the temporal and social boundaries blocking our escape from the shackles of time and from the sexist gender roles imposed upon us by modernist society.
Tykwer sets up his postmodern world in the very beginning of Run Lola Run through provocative questions with no clear answer. The narrator ironically replies to these questions by saying, "isn't it always the same question? And always the same answer?" This ambiguous answer along with the fast-paced techno music that follows and the loud ringing of Lola's phone sets a chaotic mood that is characteristic of a postmodern world. The chaos of the situation only increases once the 'game' starts and Lola has to run to save Manni's life. The extra-diegetic techno music runs with Lola as she rushes down the streets of Berlin, and the rush of the situation becomes so extreme at times that Tykwer must use animations to reflect the urgency of the situation (Tykwer).
However, the switch between animation and reality creates an increased sense of confusion and makes it harder to distinguish what is real from what is not. Sometimes the animation translates seamlessly into reality, however, the game-like nature of the situation makes the viewer uncertain of what is real. For example, an animation portraying Lola run down spiral stairs and trip on her way down translates to a limp in her run in real life (Tykwer). But the fact that Lola gets shot on her first attempt and comes back to life on her second makes the viewer question the truthfulness of what is presented, which is what Tykwer needs to establish a postmodern world with "no definite terms, boundaries, or absolute truths" (Niles).
Once Tykwer establishes this world, he is able to transgress temporal and social boundaries. The temporal boundary that forces us to rush our actions under the pressure of time is represented multiple times through the spiral motif. There is a spiral on the pillow Lola sleeps on, a spiral on the door in the animation, a spiral on the "Spirale" shop, and a spiral staircase (Tykwer). This motif symbolizes the endless spiraling of time; the endless rotation of the hands on a clock that, despite their cyclic movement, lead to different outcomes with every rotation. By creating a game-like experience, Tykwer breaks this endless spiral and allows Lola to repeat the same story and the same time frame more than once, thus transgressing the boundary of time.
On the other hand, to transgress the boundary created by modernist gender roles in society, Tykwer characterizes Lola as the player in a game where men are the source of the obstacles Lola must face to succeed. For instance, Lola must engage in a stressful race against time because of Manni's "amateur" way of handling the drug money and her father's reluctance to give her the money she needs to rescue Manni (Tykwer). Making men the source of the problem clearly transgresses the social boundary that often portrays women as the issue in society. And the fact that the female, Lola, must provide financial support for the male, Manni, reverses the modernist gender roles that dictate that males must provide for the females, which is once again a transgression of the boundary of gender roles and a rejection of the false consciousness which portrays women as unequal to men.
In conclusion, Run Lola Run is an excellent film that portrays postmodernism in a creative and thrilling way. Through Run Lola Run, Tykwer not only tries to entertain the viewer but also attempts to fight the endless spiraling of time that imprisons us and the sexist gender roles that hinder our societies' advancement. By using a game-like plot, creative mise-en-scene, and fast-paced music, Tykwer succeeds in creating a chaotic postmodern world that temporarily frees us from the social and temporal architectures of confinement present in our modernist societies today.
½ February 24, 2018
1001 movies to see before you die.
½ February 8, 2018
Some butterfly effect here, some sensory overload there: Lola may run, but this film sprints. Pumping soundtrack intensifies a well-shot, zany thriller that ignores all the rules and provides satisfying rushes of adrenalin.
October 17, 2017
I hated it. Half the movie is her running, completely unrealistic since somehow she has enough stamina to run from one side of town to the other. She gets shot but falls forwards instead of backwards. Watched twenty minutes of it and got bored because its literally her running. Somehow this may be an unpopular opinion but thats just my two cents on the issue.
September 13, 2017
Time capsule of 1999 in the best way possible.
½ August 31, 2017
Run Lola Run is a unique experiment in storytelling. The racing, pulsing soundtrack keeps the pace up through the many extending running scenes. I wanted a little more out of the plot, and the ending feels a little too abrupt, but I can see why this 1998 German thriller made an impression on audiences.
½ July 23, 2017
What a consistently fresh, exhilarating film this is, an experience like no other that generates so much excitement and stuns the audience so much that it's 100% ripe for rediscovery. An essential for people who want an introduction to foreign films and were raised on blockbusters.
May 13, 2017
a woman runs to save her boyfriend from robbing a store as he has lost 100,000 marks he owes. Circumstances stop Lola getting there on time. And she replays the day again and again. kind of like groundhog day
March 17, 2017
Absolutely amazing!!!!! Great music as well!
March 11, 2017
Artistic, energetic, an intelligent film that shakes up the idea of what a film can be.
February 25, 2017
Kind of gimmicky, kind of fun.
February 8, 2017
This film is nearly twenty years old...that makes me feel old. Anyway it's just as fun as I remembered and at a punchy, breakneck running time it's a real joy to watch again. Music is dated unbelievably though!
January 15, 2017
Trippy! Just run with it
November 16, 2016
So goddamn stylistic and loved every minute of it except the ending. Wondering if somehow Mirror's edge was inspired by this movie
½ November 6, 2016
i waited a lot of time to see such a boring movie please dont try this at home save your houres
Page 1 of 363