Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green

1945

Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green (1945)

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Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

AUDIENCE SCORE


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Movie Info

Based on Conan Doyle's The Adventure of the Empty House, this "Sherlock Holmes" entry finds Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) trying to solve the case of the "Finger Murders". Several beautiful women have been found slain, all with their right forefingers severed from their hands. The police are prepared to write off the killings as the work of a madman, but Holmes deduces that there's a sane motive behind it all. Sure enough, the trail of evidence leads to Holmes' perennial nemesis Professor Moriarity (Henry Daniell), who is in league with lissome female criminal Lydia (Hillary Brooke). Though it isn't sporting to reveal Moriarity's nefarious scheme here, it can be noted that The Woman in Green comes to a nailbiting conclusion as a hypnotized Holmes wanders precariously along the ledge of a penthouse!

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Cast

Basil Rathbone
as Sherlock Holmes
Nigel Bruce
as Dr. John H. Watson
Henry Daniell
as Professor Moriarty
Hillary Brooke
as Lydia Marlow
Paul Cavanagh
as Sir George Fenwick
Matthew Boulton
as Inspector Gregson
Eve Amber
as Maude Fenwick
Tom Bryson
as Williams
Mary Gordon
as Mrs. Hudson
Percival Vivian
as Dr. Simnell
Harold De Becker
as Shabby man
Tommy Hughes
as Newsman
Billy Bevan
as Street Peddler
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Critic Reviews for Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green

All Critics (8)

Superior entry in the delightful Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce series.

Aug 27, 2010 | Rating: 4/5

No one does Holmes like Basil, and this ranks among the stronger of the series

Feb 2, 2007 | Rating: 4/5

It's one of the best in the series, partly because it strays from formula and partly because it summons some genuine mystery.

Oct 29, 2005 | Rating: 3.5/5 | Full Review…

A solid entry in the Holmes series.

Sep 17, 2005 | Rating: B | Full Review…

Interesting Rathbone Holmes film with a slightly different approach

Sep 12, 2002 | Rating: 3/5

engaging in the way it predates both the serial killer narrative ... and the mind-control paranoia that infused Cold War films

Nov 4, 2001 | Rating: 3/4

Audience Reviews for Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green

I love the Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce quite a bit, but The Woman in Green is a slight step back to me in terms of story quality. For one, the emphasis turns out to be mainly on Moriarty's use of hypnotism, instead of the more intriguing 'modern day Jack the Ripper' plot thread that turns out to be a red herring of sorts. I'm not saying that Moriarty shouldn't have been involved with the story, but this one feels a little bit forced, and doesn't seem to flow as well as some of the others. It's still enjoyable, but not quite fulfilling enough.

Tim Salmons
Tim Salmons

Super Reviewer

Interesting but placing a lot of the blame on hypnotism was a bit sill. Glad that Moriarty was mainly responsible though.

Sunil Jawahir
Sunil Jawahir

Super Reviewer

½

I found this review by dhetteix rather useful: "this particular outing for Holmes is a bit of a letdown. To be sure, the themes of Hypnotism and serial-killing are out-and-out Doyle, but the inclusion of Moriarty, seemingly included for effect, merely softens the plot by introducing a major character for a somewhat brief caper. The film starts strong, yet ends predictably, with none of Holmes' deductive reasoning being revealed. Whilst strong in all other ways, the movie thus forgets the first rule of a Mystery plot: to remain mysterious."

Anastasia  Bartzoulianou
Anastasia Bartzoulianou

Super Reviewer

½

The illustrious Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce never falter in their acting, although this particular outing for Holmes is a bit of a letdown. To be sure, the themes of Hypnotism and serial-killing are out-and-out Doyle, but the inclusion of Moriarty, seemingly included for effect, merely softens the plot by introducing a major character for a somewhat brief caper. The film starts strong, yet ends predictably, with none of Holmes' deductive reasoning being revealed. Whilst strong in all other ways, the movie thus forgets the first rule of a Mystery plot: to remain mysterious.

Daniel Hetteix
Daniel Hetteix

Super Reviewer

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