Shine Reviews

  • Sep 18, 2020

    If you're looking for a fantastic film about an eccentric, self-imploding, mentally unstable, real-life musician, check out The Devil & Daniel Johnston. Based on its reputation, I thought the Rush performance might be entertaining & impressive enough to make Shine engaging; and while he's good, he's really not in it much, the movie focusing more on the daddy-issue flashbacks, a character motivation that is among the most boring & cliched ever. A consistently eye-rolling clock-watcher.

    If you're looking for a fantastic film about an eccentric, self-imploding, mentally unstable, real-life musician, check out The Devil & Daniel Johnston. Based on its reputation, I thought the Rush performance might be entertaining & impressive enough to make Shine engaging; and while he's good, he's really not in it much, the movie focusing more on the daddy-issue flashbacks, a character motivation that is among the most boring & cliched ever. A consistently eye-rolling clock-watcher.

  • Sep 15, 2020

    La vida de un prodigioso pianista Australiano llamado David Helfgott (Geoffrey Rush) que sufre un colapso nervioso y poco a poco gracias a la comprensión de una mujer va intentando gradualmente de ser "funcional" en éste complicado mundo. La película está dividida en 3 etapas de la vida de David y en cada una vemos cómo su talento y sus emociones no son compatibles gracias a sus experiencias cuando debería ser todo lo contrario. Ésta es una película motivante, hermosa, llena de matices, sentimientos y emociones tan poderosos cómo sugiere el concierto No. 3 de Rachmaninoff, pieza fundamental de éste filme. Basada en un caso real, y al parecer fiel en cuanto a la representación de los hechos; ésta es una película maravillosa por parte del director Scott Hicks que sin duda todo se lo debe al profesionalismo del gran Geoffrey Rush.

    La vida de un prodigioso pianista Australiano llamado David Helfgott (Geoffrey Rush) que sufre un colapso nervioso y poco a poco gracias a la comprensión de una mujer va intentando gradualmente de ser "funcional" en éste complicado mundo. La película está dividida en 3 etapas de la vida de David y en cada una vemos cómo su talento y sus emociones no son compatibles gracias a sus experiencias cuando debería ser todo lo contrario. Ésta es una película motivante, hermosa, llena de matices, sentimientos y emociones tan poderosos cómo sugiere el concierto No. 3 de Rachmaninoff, pieza fundamental de éste filme. Basada en un caso real, y al parecer fiel en cuanto a la representación de los hechos; ésta es una película maravillosa por parte del director Scott Hicks que sin duda todo se lo debe al profesionalismo del gran Geoffrey Rush.

  • Jul 08, 2020

    Rush is fantastic and the film is really good.

    Rush is fantastic and the film is really good.

  • Apr 27, 2020

    Beautiful lead performance from Rush (and Noah Taylor).

    Beautiful lead performance from Rush (and Noah Taylor).

  • Oct 26, 2019

    The biopic generally requires a figure with an immense amount of talent to face a traumatic childhood which leaves them mentally unstable as an adult before being saved by the love of a good woman. See Walk the Line (2005), Bound for Glory (1976) and this Australian film which managed to earn a Best Picture nomination and a Best Actor Academy Award for star Geoffrey Rush. I must admit that while film is an effective emotional study of the impact that David Helfgott's overbearing father had on him it falls into feeling like misery porn far too often and it's various segments do not necessarily add up to a satisfying whole. Talented young piano prodigy David Helfgott, Geoffrey Rush, is abused by his father Peter, Armin Mueller-Stahl, who attempts to live through his son and places far too much pressure on him. Helfgott is discovered by piano teacher Ben Rosen, Nicholas Bell, at a competition and with his aid begins to win more competitions. As a teenager he receives several musical scholarships but his father fears letting go of him and prevents him from accepting several of them. After receiving finances from close friend Katharine Susannah Pritchard, Googie Withers, he musters up the courage to accept a scholarship but his father tells him he will never be accepted by his family again. With a huge amount of effort he performs Rachmaninoff in a showcase at his posh school in London but has a breakdown and receives electroshock treatment. In his later years he is cared for by nurses and attempts to reconcile with his family but ultimately finds rehabilitation through his relationship with Gillian, Lynn Redgrave. For anybody who has ever seen a biopic this will offer nothing new but what the film benefits from is the fine performances from Mueller-Stahl, Rush and Noah Taylor as the teenage version of Helfgott. It must be said that Rush's Best Actor win was a case of category fraud as he is definitely not the lead in this film and if any of the actors should have been nominated for their portrayal of Helfgott it is Taylor. The role does feel rather ‘oscar-baity' as Helfgott has to endure a lot of abuse, develops tics and is a little unusual and misunderstood but at least Rush commits to going the Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man (1988) route. They tap into the fear and isolation that a traumatized person feels and the sweetness and idiosyncrasies of Helfgott are brought to life by Taylor in particular. Mueller-Stahl is chilling as the overbearing father who channels his own unfulfilled ambitions into his innocent son. Redgrave gets little do as she plays the typical supportive woman who is there to deal with her husband's issues and express minor distress when he goes too far. I wasn't moved to tears by any of their work but they did raise this film above Walk the Line or any number of similarly themed films based on the lives of real musicians. Where the film loses it's way is in the segmented nature of the film as it can feel as though we are not watching the same progress though life but three dramatically different men. As a child we get a sympathetic, kind young piano prodigy who greatly fears his father and has an incredible desire to succeed and make him proud. As a teenager he still has some of those elements but some of the connective tissue is missing as Taylor is so much more lively and animated than the child was and seems like a completely different person. Obviously Rush plays Helfgott after electroshock treatment and so you expect him to be different but even then it is hard to believe that he and Taylor are the same man. Maybe this was the point that the filmmakers were trying to make but the film certainly is not as successful as Atonement (2007) in showing how a certain period in time can affect a person throughout their life. I really don't believe that this film should have been nominated for Best Picture as The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996) and Walking and Talking (1996) present far better alternatives but for the crowd who enjoy this sort of film it should satisfy their needs.

    The biopic generally requires a figure with an immense amount of talent to face a traumatic childhood which leaves them mentally unstable as an adult before being saved by the love of a good woman. See Walk the Line (2005), Bound for Glory (1976) and this Australian film which managed to earn a Best Picture nomination and a Best Actor Academy Award for star Geoffrey Rush. I must admit that while film is an effective emotional study of the impact that David Helfgott's overbearing father had on him it falls into feeling like misery porn far too often and it's various segments do not necessarily add up to a satisfying whole. Talented young piano prodigy David Helfgott, Geoffrey Rush, is abused by his father Peter, Armin Mueller-Stahl, who attempts to live through his son and places far too much pressure on him. Helfgott is discovered by piano teacher Ben Rosen, Nicholas Bell, at a competition and with his aid begins to win more competitions. As a teenager he receives several musical scholarships but his father fears letting go of him and prevents him from accepting several of them. After receiving finances from close friend Katharine Susannah Pritchard, Googie Withers, he musters up the courage to accept a scholarship but his father tells him he will never be accepted by his family again. With a huge amount of effort he performs Rachmaninoff in a showcase at his posh school in London but has a breakdown and receives electroshock treatment. In his later years he is cared for by nurses and attempts to reconcile with his family but ultimately finds rehabilitation through his relationship with Gillian, Lynn Redgrave. For anybody who has ever seen a biopic this will offer nothing new but what the film benefits from is the fine performances from Mueller-Stahl, Rush and Noah Taylor as the teenage version of Helfgott. It must be said that Rush's Best Actor win was a case of category fraud as he is definitely not the lead in this film and if any of the actors should have been nominated for their portrayal of Helfgott it is Taylor. The role does feel rather ‘oscar-baity' as Helfgott has to endure a lot of abuse, develops tics and is a little unusual and misunderstood but at least Rush commits to going the Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man (1988) route. They tap into the fear and isolation that a traumatized person feels and the sweetness and idiosyncrasies of Helfgott are brought to life by Taylor in particular. Mueller-Stahl is chilling as the overbearing father who channels his own unfulfilled ambitions into his innocent son. Redgrave gets little do as she plays the typical supportive woman who is there to deal with her husband's issues and express minor distress when he goes too far. I wasn't moved to tears by any of their work but they did raise this film above Walk the Line or any number of similarly themed films based on the lives of real musicians. Where the film loses it's way is in the segmented nature of the film as it can feel as though we are not watching the same progress though life but three dramatically different men. As a child we get a sympathetic, kind young piano prodigy who greatly fears his father and has an incredible desire to succeed and make him proud. As a teenager he still has some of those elements but some of the connective tissue is missing as Taylor is so much more lively and animated than the child was and seems like a completely different person. Obviously Rush plays Helfgott after electroshock treatment and so you expect him to be different but even then it is hard to believe that he and Taylor are the same man. Maybe this was the point that the filmmakers were trying to make but the film certainly is not as successful as Atonement (2007) in showing how a certain period in time can affect a person throughout their life. I really don't believe that this film should have been nominated for Best Picture as The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996) and Walking and Talking (1996) present far better alternatives but for the crowd who enjoy this sort of film it should satisfy their needs.

  • Jun 20, 2019

    It is the best film ever made.

    It is the best film ever made.

  • Mar 08, 2019

    Great movie. Soundtrack is just as good.

    Great movie. Soundtrack is just as good.

  • Dec 17, 2018

    Excellent performances by all concerned. I loved the movie then and I love it now!

    Excellent performances by all concerned. I loved the movie then and I love it now!

  • Oct 13, 2018

    Wonderful perfomances making it very difficult not to be moved by David Helfgott's story.

    Wonderful perfomances making it very difficult not to be moved by David Helfgott's story.

  • Feb 24, 2018

    1001 movies to see before you die.

    1001 movies to see before you die.