The Congress Reviews

  • Oct 28, 2020

    The first part is GREAT especially Kietel ripping Robin. "You were a princess at 24 and America loved you. You marry that idiot. You're an American, a Texan not from some town Crap Station Australia where it was a day's walk to go to a theatre. Then the digital and cartoons starts & it all goes weird. Funny scene as Robin is on a the bomb (Slim Pickins role) and rides it down in Kubric's masterpiece "Dr. Strangelove"

    The first part is GREAT especially Kietel ripping Robin. "You were a princess at 24 and America loved you. You marry that idiot. You're an American, a Texan not from some town Crap Station Australia where it was a day's walk to go to a theatre. Then the digital and cartoons starts & it all goes weird. Funny scene as Robin is on a the bomb (Slim Pickins role) and rides it down in Kubric's masterpiece "Dr. Strangelove"

  • Sep 30, 2020

    Just... Huh? I don't get it.

    Just... Huh? I don't get it.

  • Jun 29, 2020

    This futuristic sci-fi movie is complex and mind juggling, whilst diving into how technology is ever changing. Its commentary on the corruption of increasingly advanced technology reminds one of films like Steven Spielberg's Ready Player One. I love the fact that I was paying close attention and super engaged in order to catch every detail of this vivid complex world and the fascinating storyline. The story follows the digitalization of aging actress Robin Wright, and how signing up for her final acting job has consequences that will affect her in ways no one would have considered. This animated sci-fi uses a bright and exciting colour palette that is equal parts captures both a trippy and thought-provoking film. The ending left me replaying scenes in my mind after ingeniously blurring the line between reality and illusion.

    This futuristic sci-fi movie is complex and mind juggling, whilst diving into how technology is ever changing. Its commentary on the corruption of increasingly advanced technology reminds one of films like Steven Spielberg's Ready Player One. I love the fact that I was paying close attention and super engaged in order to catch every detail of this vivid complex world and the fascinating storyline. The story follows the digitalization of aging actress Robin Wright, and how signing up for her final acting job has consequences that will affect her in ways no one would have considered. This animated sci-fi uses a bright and exciting colour palette that is equal parts captures both a trippy and thought-provoking film. The ending left me replaying scenes in my mind after ingeniously blurring the line between reality and illusion.

  • Jun 28, 2020

    This is the worst movie ever made in the history of movies. This movie exhausts it's flimsy plot in the first 15 minutes and then nonsensical things happen randomly until the film ends. Except this film doesn't have an ending per se.. it just ends. You could literally do anything else and it would be a better use of your time.

    This is the worst movie ever made in the history of movies. This movie exhausts it's flimsy plot in the first 15 minutes and then nonsensical things happen randomly until the film ends. Except this film doesn't have an ending per se.. it just ends. You could literally do anything else and it would be a better use of your time.

  • Jun 25, 2020

    This film is a beautiful and heartbreaking tale about aging in the world of fame. The films proposed conception of making movie stars into a unit makes the viewer realize how much this story relates to the reality many feel when they sign a contract into stardom. The film's blending of reality and animation also brings attention to the possible pitfalls of drug addiction and how one can lose touch with reality when they avoid facing their addiction. Robin Wright is amazing in this, bringing emotion to each scene as she goes from superstar to the face of a revolution that she hates. She shows how a person's love for their child can be the driving force in keeping their sanity, and the film is a reminder that the ones who love you are the people that will go the limit for you. It's an amazing film that highlights Hollywood's corruption, dependency, & the loss of humanity we face in this world, and I can't wait to watch it again.

    This film is a beautiful and heartbreaking tale about aging in the world of fame. The films proposed conception of making movie stars into a unit makes the viewer realize how much this story relates to the reality many feel when they sign a contract into stardom. The film's blending of reality and animation also brings attention to the possible pitfalls of drug addiction and how one can lose touch with reality when they avoid facing their addiction. Robin Wright is amazing in this, bringing emotion to each scene as she goes from superstar to the face of a revolution that she hates. She shows how a person's love for their child can be the driving force in keeping their sanity, and the film is a reminder that the ones who love you are the people that will go the limit for you. It's an amazing film that highlights Hollywood's corruption, dependency, & the loss of humanity we face in this world, and I can't wait to watch it again.

  • Jun 03, 2020

    Why do people make films? To entertain us is the most obvious answer. But some films are made to educate us. Some great films inspire us to envision and create a better world. And then there are films made simply to rake in cash, films with no intelligence or humanity, like The Transformers franchise or almost anything starring Adam Sandler. And to support this bottom line of greed, a new reason for making films has emerged: to anesthetize us. In The Congress, a performer named Robin Wright is played by Robin Wright. She's offered a very unusual contract by a "Miramount" studio executive (played with oily perfection by Danny Huston). After giving Wright an obscene amount of money, Miramount will use advanced technology to scan her image with such precision that they she never needs to appear on a film set. Miramount owns her likeness as a performer, and can do anything with it — while she is not allowed to perform on film or even in public herself. Robin Wright the human being is no longer an actor, while Robin Wright the actor is now computer code owned by Miramount. Twenty years later, she has aged most gracefully. But her computer likeness is ever youthful, appearing as a kick-ass Matrix-like superhero. It makes no matter that the flesh-and-blood Robin Wright is actually far more beautiful and interesting than her computer likeness. That is of no value to a film studio looking for the next profitable action franchise. In this future, Wright is invited to a convention or "congress" at Miramount. But before entering the property, she is required to inhale a drug that causes her to see everything as a brightly-colored cartoon. (Imagine an LSD trip as illustrated by Max Fleischer.) This makes it hard to know exactly what's real, and that's the point. In this bright, shiny cartoon world, Hollywood has joined forces with the pharmaceutical industry to ensure the masses are less and less in touch with reality. They are obedient consumers. As Wright says at the congress after storming the stage and grabbing the microphone away from a speaker: "Wake up, people. Wake up." The Congress is based on the 1971 novel The Futurological Congress by Polish sci-fi writer Stanislaw Lem.

    Why do people make films? To entertain us is the most obvious answer. But some films are made to educate us. Some great films inspire us to envision and create a better world. And then there are films made simply to rake in cash, films with no intelligence or humanity, like The Transformers franchise or almost anything starring Adam Sandler. And to support this bottom line of greed, a new reason for making films has emerged: to anesthetize us. In The Congress, a performer named Robin Wright is played by Robin Wright. She's offered a very unusual contract by a "Miramount" studio executive (played with oily perfection by Danny Huston). After giving Wright an obscene amount of money, Miramount will use advanced technology to scan her image with such precision that they she never needs to appear on a film set. Miramount owns her likeness as a performer, and can do anything with it — while she is not allowed to perform on film or even in public herself. Robin Wright the human being is no longer an actor, while Robin Wright the actor is now computer code owned by Miramount. Twenty years later, she has aged most gracefully. But her computer likeness is ever youthful, appearing as a kick-ass Matrix-like superhero. It makes no matter that the flesh-and-blood Robin Wright is actually far more beautiful and interesting than her computer likeness. That is of no value to a film studio looking for the next profitable action franchise. In this future, Wright is invited to a convention or "congress" at Miramount. But before entering the property, she is required to inhale a drug that causes her to see everything as a brightly-colored cartoon. (Imagine an LSD trip as illustrated by Max Fleischer.) This makes it hard to know exactly what's real, and that's the point. In this bright, shiny cartoon world, Hollywood has joined forces with the pharmaceutical industry to ensure the masses are less and less in touch with reality. They are obedient consumers. As Wright says at the congress after storming the stage and grabbing the microphone away from a speaker: "Wake up, people. Wake up." The Congress is based on the 1971 novel The Futurological Congress by Polish sci-fi writer Stanislaw Lem.

  • Apr 29, 2020

    Pretentious and shallow. They manage to make the great Harvey Keitel look like an animated character in Frozen. The ice. One cliche after another. What happened ? Did the director quit and the Transpo guy finished the movie?

    Pretentious and shallow. They manage to make the great Harvey Keitel look like an animated character in Frozen. The ice. One cliche after another. What happened ? Did the director quit and the Transpo guy finished the movie?

  • Apr 11, 2020

    A dense, slow movie, but it really pays for your patience. If you love that kind of Rogger Rabbit thing of mixing life action with 2D animation as much as me you´ll love the hell of this film

    A dense, slow movie, but it really pays for your patience. If you love that kind of Rogger Rabbit thing of mixing life action with 2D animation as much as me you´ll love the hell of this film

  • Feb 21, 2020

    Interesting and weird movie that definitely makes you think outside the box. Robin Wright is amazing as always. My only question after (besides what does the ending mean lol) is what about her daughter?

    Interesting and weird movie that definitely makes you think outside the box. Robin Wright is amazing as always. My only question after (besides what does the ending mean lol) is what about her daughter?

  • Feb 02, 2020

    Ok these reviews look bad. But look this move is easily one of my favorites. It's jam packed with symbolism and every time I watch it I find something new. It is worth it just watch it though and really ponder human relations. And how far are we really willing to go to escape reality. Very much an underrated film. I made an account just to make this comment if that tells you anything.

    Ok these reviews look bad. But look this move is easily one of my favorites. It's jam packed with symbolism and every time I watch it I find something new. It is worth it just watch it though and really ponder human relations. And how far are we really willing to go to escape reality. Very much an underrated film. I made an account just to make this comment if that tells you anything.