The Disappearance Reviews

  • Sep 16, 2013

    The Disappearance is an interesting romanctic thriller (no not porn... that would be a thrill of a romantic nature or with romantic gestures). Featuring Donald Sutherland as an international assassin who is grappling with the disappearance of his beloved but wandering wife as well as a new target, it is a simple tale told... rather complicatedly. Using a series of flashbacks interwoven with current happenings, the film can get a little confusing. This is of course done to produce a red herring and allow for the twist ending but the ending isn't as much a twist as you might think. In fact, it's pretty obvious the outcome of the film even if the reasoning for it isn't. And this is where the films fails. Had the flashbacks been more about clues as to what was truly going on, then they would be more relevant. As they are, the flashbacks help to develope the relationship between Sutherland and his wife (played by Francine Racette) but do little more than pad the film and delay the eventual outcome. The film does look quite nice though thanks to the work of cinematographer John Alcott (A Clockwork Orange, The Shining), and while the performances of the actors are all well done, it just doesn't live up to its potential.

    The Disappearance is an interesting romanctic thriller (no not porn... that would be a thrill of a romantic nature or with romantic gestures). Featuring Donald Sutherland as an international assassin who is grappling with the disappearance of his beloved but wandering wife as well as a new target, it is a simple tale told... rather complicatedly. Using a series of flashbacks interwoven with current happenings, the film can get a little confusing. This is of course done to produce a red herring and allow for the twist ending but the ending isn't as much a twist as you might think. In fact, it's pretty obvious the outcome of the film even if the reasoning for it isn't. And this is where the films fails. Had the flashbacks been more about clues as to what was truly going on, then they would be more relevant. As they are, the flashbacks help to develope the relationship between Sutherland and his wife (played by Francine Racette) but do little more than pad the film and delay the eventual outcome. The film does look quite nice though thanks to the work of cinematographer John Alcott (A Clockwork Orange, The Shining), and while the performances of the actors are all well done, it just doesn't live up to its potential.

  • Oct 27, 2012

    A hitman wonders why or who his wife has left him for as he takes on a new assignement. Plods a bit but has enough twists at the end to make it a reasonable view. It looks chilly in Montreal.

    A hitman wonders why or who his wife has left him for as he takes on a new assignement. Plods a bit but has enough twists at the end to make it a reasonable view. It looks chilly in Montreal.

  • Feb 05, 2011

    A hitman wonders why or who his wife has left him for as he takes on a new assignement. Plods a bit but has enough twists at the end to make it a reasonable view. It looks chilly in Montreal.

    A hitman wonders why or who his wife has left him for as he takes on a new assignement. Plods a bit but has enough twists at the end to make it a reasonable view. It looks chilly in Montreal.

  • Apr 25, 2010

    The visual eye and fragmentary narrative style of Nicholas Roeg are the clear influences on this minor wintry thriller starring Donald Sutherland as an emotionally distant hitman searching for his wife while taking on a new contract. From a plot point of view there are no real surprises with Cooper and screenwriter Paul Mayersberg also borrowing the bittersweet and cynical endings of Robert Aldrich's 'Hustle' and Mike Hodges 'Get Carter' to bring their narrative to a close. Montreal locations give the film an other-worldly edge at times similar to that of early Cronenberg, one that it inevitably looses when the story moves to the UK. There is some interest to be had from how the film portrays its society of hitman in the same jaded way as Le Carre portrays the British Secret Service - though any ambiguity about Sutherlands's associates is negated by them all being played by the always distrustful likes of David Warner, David Hemmings, John Hurt and Peter Bowles. Sutherland himself is icily convincing as the reptilian assassin, emotionally breaking down only, fatally so as it turns out, at the end of the film.

    The visual eye and fragmentary narrative style of Nicholas Roeg are the clear influences on this minor wintry thriller starring Donald Sutherland as an emotionally distant hitman searching for his wife while taking on a new contract. From a plot point of view there are no real surprises with Cooper and screenwriter Paul Mayersberg also borrowing the bittersweet and cynical endings of Robert Aldrich's 'Hustle' and Mike Hodges 'Get Carter' to bring their narrative to a close. Montreal locations give the film an other-worldly edge at times similar to that of early Cronenberg, one that it inevitably looses when the story moves to the UK. There is some interest to be had from how the film portrays its society of hitman in the same jaded way as Le Carre portrays the British Secret Service - though any ambiguity about Sutherlands's associates is negated by them all being played by the always distrustful likes of David Warner, David Hemmings, John Hurt and Peter Bowles. Sutherland himself is icily convincing as the reptilian assassin, emotionally breaking down only, fatally so as it turns out, at the end of the film.

  • Dec 12, 2008

    Passable Canadian entry with Donald Sutherland hired to carry out a hit on his boss, who he suspects is involved with his wife's disappearance. Made when Sutherland would frequently be seen at Montreal Expos games.

    Passable Canadian entry with Donald Sutherland hired to carry out a hit on his boss, who he suspects is involved with his wife's disappearance. Made when Sutherland would frequently be seen at Montreal Expos games.

  • Apr 09, 2008

    If you don't have a nice build up of characters and plot, then it's hard to have suspense. Hmm, I can't recommend this film as no one seems to know it anyway!

    If you don't have a nice build up of characters and plot, then it's hard to have suspense. Hmm, I can't recommend this film as no one seems to know it anyway!

  • Sanity Assassin ! Super Reviewer
    Jan 03, 2008

    stark and slow moving to start with donald sutherland plays a contract killer hired to kill... well, his last shadowy target as he slowly finds out is an ironic one. there's a certain nihilistic sense to the film throughout and even the end leaves you guessing. love the cold and snowy scenery

    stark and slow moving to start with donald sutherland plays a contract killer hired to kill... well, his last shadowy target as he slowly finds out is an ironic one. there's a certain nihilistic sense to the film throughout and even the end leaves you guessing. love the cold and snowy scenery

  • Mar 09, 2006

    This a rather underwhelming thriller but the minimalist style is oddly appealing

    This a rather underwhelming thriller but the minimalist style is oddly appealing