Victoria Reviews

  • Mar 02, 2019

    A relatively succeful new dimension/experience in filmmaking,

    A relatively succeful new dimension/experience in filmmaking,

  • Dec 11, 2018

    This is not a horror... its an extremely slow burn thriller that really really picks up in the second half. Its got a ton of heart and emotion, which is great. The broken english gives it tht truly authentic feel. The plot here is very unique and engrossing. In the first half it deals with a romantic love story thats fun and flirtatious. The second half is an emotional rollercoaster of action and suspense. The acting is really good, hence the relationship feels real, as does the stress and bewilderment in the second half. The fact that its all accomplished in one take is mind blowing. Really really impressive.

    This is not a horror... its an extremely slow burn thriller that really really picks up in the second half. Its got a ton of heart and emotion, which is great. The broken english gives it tht truly authentic feel. The plot here is very unique and engrossing. In the first half it deals with a romantic love story thats fun and flirtatious. The second half is an emotional rollercoaster of action and suspense. The acting is really good, hence the relationship feels real, as does the stress and bewilderment in the second half. The fact that its all accomplished in one take is mind blowing. Really really impressive.

  • Nov 14, 2018

    Impressive for the way it is shot? Without shadow of a doubt. Good? Pretty good. Tiring? Yep, pretty tiring also. Why? Taking a long single-take cannot be an excuse to forget about the story, and here the story is pretty thin and not very imaginative. especially because of the challenging 140 minutes that requires. So if you like cinema in general this is a must and I recommended it, but if you ask me if it was enjoyable... I'll point you in the direction of "Birdman" over and over again.

    Impressive for the way it is shot? Without shadow of a doubt. Good? Pretty good. Tiring? Yep, pretty tiring also. Why? Taking a long single-take cannot be an excuse to forget about the story, and here the story is pretty thin and not very imaginative. especially because of the challenging 140 minutes that requires. So if you like cinema in general this is a must and I recommended it, but if you ask me if it was enjoyable... I'll point you in the direction of "Birdman" over and over again.

  • Jul 12, 2018

    - Victoria is your getaway driver, on a night you won't forget. - I'm a sucker for good movie trailers. It's why I was excited to see crime drama, Victoria. As soon as I pressed play on the trailer, I heard Nils Frahm's haunting club music. It's dark, and dope. I was already hooked. Victoria's like the trailer music, fast and foreboding. And, like the continuity of the song's beat, the entire film is one - single - shot. It's two straight hours of a girl's roller-coaster-encounter with some sketchy dudes and their alarming evening plans. But the one thing missing from the trailer is the tenderness and intimacy of the leading lady Victoria (Laia Costa, Palm Trees in the Snow) herself. Victoria has a talent for playing the piano. She reveals that she wasn't good enough for the music school she attended, which sounds like an insanely competitive environment. (I picture the movie Whiplash as she talks about it.) The competition made her fellow students her enemies. She says it even caused her to want her own friends to fail. Over the course of the film, she manages to find new friends and create a meaningful bond with them - just not in a way she ever could have imagined. Companionship is something Victoria didn't have before, spending all her waking hours practicing piano in an environment for which she could never be good enough. Now she has it, and with a reckless abandon, there's no limit to what she'll do to keep it. We first meet Victoria in a club, dancing. She goes to the bar and orders a shot, tries to make conversation with the bartender, offers him a drink. I thought, Did she really come to this club alone? The longer I watched, the more I realized she just wants to be a part of a team, to be wanted and needed. Outside of the club, she meets a band of men who call themselves brothers (though I don't think they're actually brothers). They make her smile and laugh, so she sticks with them for the night. They happily welcome her in, and it isn't long before they start calling her "sister." She's charming, but they're not. They make jokes that aren't funny, but they still laugh. They know to be nervous when the cops drive around. I feel like I know these guys from somewhere. Bros. That's what they are, I think, as I roll my eyes at them for the fourth time. What does she see in them? One of the brothers, Boxer (Franz Rogowski), owes a gangster who gave him protection while he was in prison for assault. The gangster demands three guys and a driver for some undisclosed purpose, and Fuß (Max Mauff), another brother, is too drunk to come along. Out of desperation, they ask Victoria to drive. She does. When they get to the gangster, he demands that they rob a bank. They refuse, but he says he's taking "the bitch" until Boxer pays up. Already mortified that they've involved her as much as they have, they immediately concede. It didn't take long before my heart was racing along with theirs. What could go wrong with three amateur ruffians and one random chick who works at a cafe robbing a bank spontaneously? A whole hell of a lot! It forced me to wonder, how far would I go to alleviate loneliness? What would I do to feel needed? What would being wanted make me capable of? I kept telling Victoria, "Leave! Walk away! You don't need to stay in this!" (Yeah, I talk at the screen. But it's okay, I was at home.) I wondered, Where is her agency?! and thought maybe this is a film about a woman being taken advantage of in a man's world. There's definitely some of that, but it's also definitely more than that. I've been in similar situations. I've had nights out with a friend at some bar, and we end up following a group to the next one, and then to an apartment. Okay, another drink. It gets late, but anything sounds better than being home alone. By the end of the night, I find myself asking, How did I get here? For Victoria, it's not that the brothers are men she can't say no to; they're friends she cares about and is ready to risk everything for. This emotional complexity is captured perfectly by Laia Costa's fantastic performance. She makes Victoria sweet and sincere, and yet so vulnerable at the same time. As intense as Victoria gets, it never stops being intimately relatable. It begged me to ask, what does Victoria see in these guys? Why doesn't she leave? The answers to these questions aren't necessarily logical but are thoroughly human. This was something that drew me in, just as Victoria was drawn to the brothers. We've all been there, allowing ourselves to get pulled into something that may not be good for us, but that fulfills our need for something deeply missing in our lives. ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://narrativemuse.co/movies/victoria, and was written by Jack Holloway. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

    - Victoria is your getaway driver, on a night you won't forget. - I'm a sucker for good movie trailers. It's why I was excited to see crime drama, Victoria. As soon as I pressed play on the trailer, I heard Nils Frahm's haunting club music. It's dark, and dope. I was already hooked. Victoria's like the trailer music, fast and foreboding. And, like the continuity of the song's beat, the entire film is one - single - shot. It's two straight hours of a girl's roller-coaster-encounter with some sketchy dudes and their alarming evening plans. But the one thing missing from the trailer is the tenderness and intimacy of the leading lady Victoria (Laia Costa, Palm Trees in the Snow) herself. Victoria has a talent for playing the piano. She reveals that she wasn't good enough for the music school she attended, which sounds like an insanely competitive environment. (I picture the movie Whiplash as she talks about it.) The competition made her fellow students her enemies. She says it even caused her to want her own friends to fail. Over the course of the film, she manages to find new friends and create a meaningful bond with them - just not in a way she ever could have imagined. Companionship is something Victoria didn't have before, spending all her waking hours practicing piano in an environment for which she could never be good enough. Now she has it, and with a reckless abandon, there's no limit to what she'll do to keep it. We first meet Victoria in a club, dancing. She goes to the bar and orders a shot, tries to make conversation with the bartender, offers him a drink. I thought, Did she really come to this club alone? The longer I watched, the more I realized she just wants to be a part of a team, to be wanted and needed. Outside of the club, she meets a band of men who call themselves brothers (though I don't think they're actually brothers). They make her smile and laugh, so she sticks with them for the night. They happily welcome her in, and it isn't long before they start calling her "sister." She's charming, but they're not. They make jokes that aren't funny, but they still laugh. They know to be nervous when the cops drive around. I feel like I know these guys from somewhere. Bros. That's what they are, I think, as I roll my eyes at them for the fourth time. What does she see in them? One of the brothers, Boxer (Franz Rogowski), owes a gangster who gave him protection while he was in prison for assault. The gangster demands three guys and a driver for some undisclosed purpose, and Fuß (Max Mauff), another brother, is too drunk to come along. Out of desperation, they ask Victoria to drive. She does. When they get to the gangster, he demands that they rob a bank. They refuse, but he says he's taking "the bitch" until Boxer pays up. Already mortified that they've involved her as much as they have, they immediately concede. It didn't take long before my heart was racing along with theirs. What could go wrong with three amateur ruffians and one random chick who works at a cafe robbing a bank spontaneously? A whole hell of a lot! It forced me to wonder, how far would I go to alleviate loneliness? What would I do to feel needed? What would being wanted make me capable of? I kept telling Victoria, "Leave! Walk away! You don't need to stay in this!" (Yeah, I talk at the screen. But it's okay, I was at home.) I wondered, Where is her agency?! and thought maybe this is a film about a woman being taken advantage of in a man's world. There's definitely some of that, but it's also definitely more than that. I've been in similar situations. I've had nights out with a friend at some bar, and we end up following a group to the next one, and then to an apartment. Okay, another drink. It gets late, but anything sounds better than being home alone. By the end of the night, I find myself asking, How did I get here? For Victoria, it's not that the brothers are men she can't say no to; they're friends she cares about and is ready to risk everything for. This emotional complexity is captured perfectly by Laia Costa's fantastic performance. She makes Victoria sweet and sincere, and yet so vulnerable at the same time. As intense as Victoria gets, it never stops being intimately relatable. It begged me to ask, what does Victoria see in these guys? Why doesn't she leave? The answers to these questions aren't necessarily logical but are thoroughly human. This was something that drew me in, just as Victoria was drawn to the brothers. We've all been there, allowing ourselves to get pulled into something that may not be good for us, but that fulfills our need for something deeply missing in our lives. ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://narrativemuse.co/movies/victoria, and was written by Jack Holloway. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

  • Jun 29, 2018

    One of the strongest pieces of German cinema so far. Entirely shot in one magnificent take that demands everything from the great actors, Victoria feels unique like no other movie and draws you deep into its dramatic though tiny plot. Impressive.

    One of the strongest pieces of German cinema so far. Entirely shot in one magnificent take that demands everything from the great actors, Victoria feels unique like no other movie and draws you deep into its dramatic though tiny plot. Impressive.

  • May 31, 2018

    Victoria is German film set during the early hours in real time. Victoria has recently moved to Berlin from Madrid, she has a dead end job and knows no one in the new city she finds herself in. She goes out clubbing, hoping to make friends and as she leaves on this particular night she strikes up a conversation with 4 young German men who convince her to spend a few hours with them. Although I can't imagine any young woman in an unfamiliar city would actually do this, Victoria is portrayed as somewhat naive. Any how, the group walk the city, mess around and drink beer until the group become anxious after a phone call orders them to complete a job. They are one man down and convince Victoria to help out. What Victoria doesn't realise is the job is a bank heist by order of scary German gangster types and so begins the second half of the film, a frantic race against time and fight for survival in a heist gone wrong. This was a really well done story that amazingly was all shot in one complete take, very impressive film making.

    Victoria is German film set during the early hours in real time. Victoria has recently moved to Berlin from Madrid, she has a dead end job and knows no one in the new city she finds herself in. She goes out clubbing, hoping to make friends and as she leaves on this particular night she strikes up a conversation with 4 young German men who convince her to spend a few hours with them. Although I can't imagine any young woman in an unfamiliar city would actually do this, Victoria is portrayed as somewhat naive. Any how, the group walk the city, mess around and drink beer until the group become anxious after a phone call orders them to complete a job. They are one man down and convince Victoria to help out. What Victoria doesn't realise is the job is a bank heist by order of scary German gangster types and so begins the second half of the film, a frantic race against time and fight for survival in a heist gone wrong. This was a really well done story that amazingly was all shot in one complete take, very impressive film making.

  • Apr 01, 2018

    Apart from being a hugely impressive technical feat with everything being filmed in a single take (one, continuous take... mind-blowing), what makes this such a remarkable film is just how incredibly immersive it is. Everything comes together - the ultra-realistic acting, dialogue and characters, as well as the lack of anything that would feel out of place in the real world (effects, filters, unrealistic explosions etc.) -- to make the audience feel like they're right there as an unseen character, experiencing the events as they are, making it an almost unbearably tense affair that has you very much on edge. Real effort was put into making it feel genuine, sometimes too genuine with a few scenes that go on for just that little bit too long; and some that, whilst they may be realistic, don't make for particularly engaging viewing. Overall, however, it is very, very good and proves that you don't need all the bells and whistles to create something pretty amazing.

    Apart from being a hugely impressive technical feat with everything being filmed in a single take (one, continuous take... mind-blowing), what makes this such a remarkable film is just how incredibly immersive it is. Everything comes together - the ultra-realistic acting, dialogue and characters, as well as the lack of anything that would feel out of place in the real world (effects, filters, unrealistic explosions etc.) -- to make the audience feel like they're right there as an unseen character, experiencing the events as they are, making it an almost unbearably tense affair that has you very much on edge. Real effort was put into making it feel genuine, sometimes too genuine with a few scenes that go on for just that little bit too long; and some that, whilst they may be realistic, don't make for particularly engaging viewing. Overall, however, it is very, very good and proves that you don't need all the bells and whistles to create something pretty amazing.

  • Mar 21, 2018

    Victoria is a successful experiment! As with every experiment, describing the movie falls short of experiencing it. However, experiencing it, stresses its unconventional nature, possibly making it uninteresting for some viewers. Upon closer inspection, it gets clear that the underlying motivation was primarily on the technical aspects, and as the movie progresses less on the characters and on the plot. After all, the viewer marvels at how the scenes were shot, which means the clear focus lies on how the movie's production works - and not so much on the plot and on the characterization. Technically speaking, this movie achieved everything it was intended to do and as the movie is one of two feature films shot in this way, it is a required viewing for people interested in filmmaking. Overall 7/10 My Review: https://movie-discourse.blogspot.de/2018/03/victoria-ger-2015.html?view=flipcard Twitter: @Max4Movies

    Victoria is a successful experiment! As with every experiment, describing the movie falls short of experiencing it. However, experiencing it, stresses its unconventional nature, possibly making it uninteresting for some viewers. Upon closer inspection, it gets clear that the underlying motivation was primarily on the technical aspects, and as the movie progresses less on the characters and on the plot. After all, the viewer marvels at how the scenes were shot, which means the clear focus lies on how the movie's production works - and not so much on the plot and on the characterization. Technically speaking, this movie achieved everything it was intended to do and as the movie is one of two feature films shot in this way, it is a required viewing for people interested in filmmaking. Overall 7/10 My Review: https://movie-discourse.blogspot.de/2018/03/victoria-ger-2015.html?view=flipcard Twitter: @Max4Movies

  • Jan 31, 2018

    "Victoria" has a dark atmosphere that goes well with what the movie tries (and succeeds) to tell us. It's a great thriller and you won't regret giving it a try.

    "Victoria" has a dark atmosphere that goes well with what the movie tries (and succeeds) to tell us. It's a great thriller and you won't regret giving it a try.

  • Jan 27, 2018

    Very well made thriller with a good plot and interesting characters sewn together. And being shot in out take and achieve such a well completed work..superb ! Great watch

    Very well made thriller with a good plot and interesting characters sewn together. And being shot in out take and achieve such a well completed work..superb ! Great watch