Shape of Pasta: Season 1 Reviews

May 13, 2020
Funke is soft-spoken and sincere, both of which pair well with the quibi's slow, relaxed pacing.
May 13, 2020
Chef Evan Funke's exploration of rare pasta shapes is an enlightening experience for any foodie... The Shape of Pasta's "10-minute or less" runtime feels insufficient.
Full Review | Original Score: 7/10
May 13, 2020
There is little about "The Shape of Pasta" that makes the series stand out from other food travel shows. While Funke can be enjoyable, he does not bring the same energy or excitement as David Chang or Anthony Bourdain.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
May 13, 2020
ach episode is a self-contained encounter that packs in a lot of information, a cooking demonstration and a moving human encounter in about the time it takes pasta to cook. I found it moving and addictive.
May 13, 2020
May not sound like exciting TV, but this ended up being one of the most watchable shows available. It's also incredibly laid-back and even slow-moving, which makes it an extremely odd fit for a streaming service all about quick bites.
April 8, 2020
Add the extra level of pensiveness, the recency of this documentary series, and the ways the world has changed since it was shot, and Shape of Pasta feels like a wistful sort of comfort.
April 6, 2020
The Shape of Pasta's narrow focus is a bad match for its grand, lush aesthetics.
April 6, 2020
That sounds a little ridiculous for a premise, but the filmmakers prove respectful and loving of the topic, sucking you in.
April 6, 2020
The show has a slow, languid rhythm, essentially acting as comfort food on your device as you watch Funke in his quest to bring these shapes out of obscurity and keep their traditions alive.
April 6, 2020
[Evan] Funke's journey is a moving and enlightening tribute not just to pasta, but also to the people of Italy.
April 6, 2020
It's fascinating - a travelogue of Italy in better days and an interesting exploration of culture.
April 6, 2020
Every moment seems like a parody of a highbrow foodie docuseries, but somehow it's not a joke.
April 6, 2020
Though it's not the most filling food show, Shape Of Pasta does see Funke follow in the late Anthony Bourdain's footsteps with his commitment to showcasing the people, cuisine, and culture he's learning from. So, buon appetito.
April 6, 2020
The tone has a self-seriousness that makes it seem at first like it might be parody... But this is actually a very earnest food show about ... well, lesser-known shapes of pasta.
April 6, 2020
Evan Funke's trip to Italy to learn about a variety of pasta shapes so obscure they're only used by a small circle of mostly female practitioners would be a perfect show to watch while waiting for your lunch to heat up in a workplace kitchen.