Glastonbury Reviews

  • Jun 27, 2015

    Documentário sobre o festival de Glastonbury dá mais tempo às manifestações populares do que aos concertos em palco, sendo que assim fica muito mais sujeito a ser uma galeria de freaks e saltimbancos. A falta de direcção e de foco (apesar das tentativas de analisar as transformações sociais em Inglaterra) também não ajudam a evitar que "Glastonbury" tenha o seu quê de estopada de 2 horas e tal. De resto, há uma sequência de limpeza das casas de banho que é de um incrível mau gosto.

    Documentário sobre o festival de Glastonbury dá mais tempo às manifestações populares do que aos concertos em palco, sendo que assim fica muito mais sujeito a ser uma galeria de freaks e saltimbancos. A falta de direcção e de foco (apesar das tentativas de analisar as transformações sociais em Inglaterra) também não ajudam a evitar que "Glastonbury" tenha o seu quê de estopada de 2 horas e tal. De resto, há uma sequência de limpeza das casas de banho que é de um incrível mau gosto.

  • Jul 22, 2013

    Too long and no real structure or purpose to this documentary. Apart from some great music from some of the best music has to offer, there isn't really anything here worth watching.

    Too long and no real structure or purpose to this documentary. Apart from some great music from some of the best music has to offer, there isn't really anything here worth watching.

  • Nov 06, 2012

    You probably need to have been to Glastonbury festival over 3 decades or more to really enjoy it but I have so I love it! As good to have on in the background as BBC 6 Music and as entertaining to take in as Glastonbury with a warm cider and a doobie!

    You probably need to have been to Glastonbury festival over 3 decades or more to really enjoy it but I have so I love it! As good to have on in the background as BBC 6 Music and as entertaining to take in as Glastonbury with a warm cider and a doobie!

  • Jun 15, 2012

    my mum would love it

    my mum would love it

  • Mar 07, 2012

    Don't know how/why I made it through this whole documentary. Oh yeah, I remember: because of the bands listed on the front of the case. I thought this was going to have performances by these artists - kind of like Woodstock. Show some of the crowd, but showcase the music. This was the opposite. It was basically showing the attendees of the festival from it's beginning to the present day. It also went into detail about some of the problems the town has with hosting this many people, like crime and sewage. Not that fascinating. A lot of the people that were shown were either naked or high as hell. Not that fun to watch at home. So, where does the music come in? Like, in 30 second snippets. And that's if you're lucky. The music will continue to play but the editing is so haphazard, there is no consistency, so much of the band footage is a montage, no more than a few seconds of a continuous shot at one time. If this was a marketing tool to come to the yearly festival, it did nothing to plead its case. Really not about the music - more about the revellers, who aren't so attractive.

    Don't know how/why I made it through this whole documentary. Oh yeah, I remember: because of the bands listed on the front of the case. I thought this was going to have performances by these artists - kind of like Woodstock. Show some of the crowd, but showcase the music. This was the opposite. It was basically showing the attendees of the festival from it's beginning to the present day. It also went into detail about some of the problems the town has with hosting this many people, like crime and sewage. Not that fascinating. A lot of the people that were shown were either naked or high as hell. Not that fun to watch at home. So, where does the music come in? Like, in 30 second snippets. And that's if you're lucky. The music will continue to play but the editing is so haphazard, there is no consistency, so much of the band footage is a montage, no more than a few seconds of a continuous shot at one time. If this was a marketing tool to come to the yearly festival, it did nothing to plead its case. Really not about the music - more about the revellers, who aren't so attractive.

  • Sep 03, 2011

    Directed by Julien Temple (The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle (1979), Absolute Beginners (1986) and Oil City Confidential (2009)), this was the third attempt at making a film around the annual Glastonbury festival, after Glastonbury Fayre (1972) and Glastonbury: The Movie (1996). Despite all good intentions, it actually highlights all that's wrong with the festival. The documentary focuses on how the Glastonbury festival came to be, inspired by the free festival movement in the early 1970s, like the Isle of Wight. It was started by dairy farmer Michael Eavis, who started it in 1970, and it was followed by another one. After a break of 8 years, it started up again in 1979, with Peter Gabriel and the Alex Harvey Band headlining, and it continued nearly every year ever since. It also focuses on the people who go to the festival, including New Age Hippies and old ones. The film was primarily made in 2002, when Eavis feared that because of licensing problems, it would be the last one ever, which much of the documentary was focused. However, it wasn't, and it's still going on to this day. Temple assembled the film from the festivals films between 2002 and 2005, as well as an archive of over 700 hours of footage. Instead of focusing on what the festival is really about, the music, it focuses on the idiots and troublemakers who seem to spoil it for everyone else. Watching this makes you not want to go to Glastonbury ever, they should have used all the best acts on there over the past 40 years, this reeks of self-indulgence.

    Directed by Julien Temple (The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle (1979), Absolute Beginners (1986) and Oil City Confidential (2009)), this was the third attempt at making a film around the annual Glastonbury festival, after Glastonbury Fayre (1972) and Glastonbury: The Movie (1996). Despite all good intentions, it actually highlights all that's wrong with the festival. The documentary focuses on how the Glastonbury festival came to be, inspired by the free festival movement in the early 1970s, like the Isle of Wight. It was started by dairy farmer Michael Eavis, who started it in 1970, and it was followed by another one. After a break of 8 years, it started up again in 1979, with Peter Gabriel and the Alex Harvey Band headlining, and it continued nearly every year ever since. It also focuses on the people who go to the festival, including New Age Hippies and old ones. The film was primarily made in 2002, when Eavis feared that because of licensing problems, it would be the last one ever, which much of the documentary was focused. However, it wasn't, and it's still going on to this day. Temple assembled the film from the festivals films between 2002 and 2005, as well as an archive of over 700 hours of footage. Instead of focusing on what the festival is really about, the music, it focuses on the idiots and troublemakers who seem to spoil it for everyone else. Watching this makes you not want to go to Glastonbury ever, they should have used all the best acts on there over the past 40 years, this reeks of self-indulgence.

  • Jul 04, 2011

    This brilliant documentary charts the rise of the world's biggest and best music festival - Glastonbury from its origins in 1970 as a free festival right up to the massive corporate-sponsored event it is today. Julien Temple's docu-movie distills many hundreds of hours of professional film, archive film and home movie into just over two hours and really makes you feel that you spent a whole weekend there. Just like the Festival, there are different experiences for different audiences and those who love the festival for rock music will have some considerable reward with lovely filming (and soundtrack) of the main stage acts. Others who spend their time in the more alternative areas of the festival are also rewarded with extraordinary performers. A few of the punters are great value too - look out for the young man who had been there far too long although he could just about remember that he arrived "last Sunday"!! Most interesting for me was the piece of contemporary social history that the film delivers. The first years of love and peace, followed by the travellers' convoys, the gradual growth of the corporate influence and the era of the all-encompassing wall chart people's memories of the festival through more than three decades. Some of the earliest archive footage is wonderful with great characters drawn from Pilton, the village near Glastonbury that hosts the Festival. Television coverage from those years will show you how much life has changed - as indeed have the TV presenters themselves. And the journey that Michael Eavis has himself taken over this mighty era is nicely covered too. The movie really captures the spirit of Glastonbury Festival.

    This brilliant documentary charts the rise of the world's biggest and best music festival - Glastonbury from its origins in 1970 as a free festival right up to the massive corporate-sponsored event it is today. Julien Temple's docu-movie distills many hundreds of hours of professional film, archive film and home movie into just over two hours and really makes you feel that you spent a whole weekend there. Just like the Festival, there are different experiences for different audiences and those who love the festival for rock music will have some considerable reward with lovely filming (and soundtrack) of the main stage acts. Others who spend their time in the more alternative areas of the festival are also rewarded with extraordinary performers. A few of the punters are great value too - look out for the young man who had been there far too long although he could just about remember that he arrived "last Sunday"!! Most interesting for me was the piece of contemporary social history that the film delivers. The first years of love and peace, followed by the travellers' convoys, the gradual growth of the corporate influence and the era of the all-encompassing wall chart people's memories of the festival through more than three decades. Some of the earliest archive footage is wonderful with great characters drawn from Pilton, the village near Glastonbury that hosts the Festival. Television coverage from those years will show you how much life has changed - as indeed have the TV presenters themselves. And the journey that Michael Eavis has himself taken over this mighty era is nicely covered too. The movie really captures the spirit of Glastonbury Festival.

  • Jul 04, 2011

    This brilliant documentary charts the rise of the world's biggest and best music festival - Glastonbury from its origins in 1970 as a free festival right up to the massive corporate-sponsored event it is today. Julien Temple's docu-movie distills many hundreds of hours of professional film, archive film and home movie into just over two hours and really makes you feel that you spent a whole weekend there. Just like the Festival, there are different experiences for different audiences and those who love the festival for rock music will have some considerable reward with lovely filming (and soundtrack) of the main stage acts. Others who spend their time in the more alternative areas of the festival are also rewarded with extraordinary performers. A few of the punters are great value too - look out for the young man who had been there far too long although he could just about remember that he arrived "last Sunday"!! Most interesting for me was the piece of contemporary social history that the film delivers. The first years of love and peace, followed by the travellers' convoys, the gradual growth of the corporate influence and the era of the all-encompassing wall chart people's memories of the festival through more than three decades. Some of the earliest archive footage is wonderful with great characters drawn from Pilton, the village near Glastonbury that hosts the Festival. Television coverage from those years will show you how much life has changed - as indeed have the TV presenters themselves. And the journey that Michael Eavis has himself taken over this mighty era is nicely covered too. The movie really captures the spirit of Glastonbury Festival.

    This brilliant documentary charts the rise of the world's biggest and best music festival - Glastonbury from its origins in 1970 as a free festival right up to the massive corporate-sponsored event it is today. Julien Temple's docu-movie distills many hundreds of hours of professional film, archive film and home movie into just over two hours and really makes you feel that you spent a whole weekend there. Just like the Festival, there are different experiences for different audiences and those who love the festival for rock music will have some considerable reward with lovely filming (and soundtrack) of the main stage acts. Others who spend their time in the more alternative areas of the festival are also rewarded with extraordinary performers. A few of the punters are great value too - look out for the young man who had been there far too long although he could just about remember that he arrived "last Sunday"!! Most interesting for me was the piece of contemporary social history that the film delivers. The first years of love and peace, followed by the travellers' convoys, the gradual growth of the corporate influence and the era of the all-encompassing wall chart people's memories of the festival through more than three decades. Some of the earliest archive footage is wonderful with great characters drawn from Pilton, the village near Glastonbury that hosts the Festival. Television coverage from those years will show you how much life has changed - as indeed have the TV presenters themselves. And the journey that Michael Eavis has himself taken over this mighty era is nicely covered too. The movie really captures the spirit of Glastonbury Festival.

  • Jun 27, 2011

    Wonderfully edited story of the Glastonbury Festival using archive footage to great effect. It's not just about the music!

    Wonderfully edited story of the Glastonbury Festival using archive footage to great effect. It's not just about the music!

  • Jun 21, 2011

    The music is good. But its too long and gets samey. To be frank theres too many scenes where people are bangin on about "we just wanna be away from life and be ourselves, we wanna be respected for what we are and we come here to be close to nature!" Well nice one - get on with it then. Shame that the majority of folk sayin these things clearly need some drugs to be able to have that good time. And a shame that they can only be themselves / respected / at one with nature for the one week a year at a festival in a field. In summary - Be yourself always. Innit. Unless ur a douchebag.....in which case dont be urself, pretend to be someone who isnt a douchebag.

    The music is good. But its too long and gets samey. To be frank theres too many scenes where people are bangin on about "we just wanna be away from life and be ourselves, we wanna be respected for what we are and we come here to be close to nature!" Well nice one - get on with it then. Shame that the majority of folk sayin these things clearly need some drugs to be able to have that good time. And a shame that they can only be themselves / respected / at one with nature for the one week a year at a festival in a field. In summary - Be yourself always. Innit. Unless ur a douchebag.....in which case dont be urself, pretend to be someone who isnt a douchebag.