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With four accomplished directors contributing, Dead of Night is a classic horror anthology that remains highly influential. Read critic reviews

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Movie Info

Architect Walter Craig (Mervyn Johns) goes to Pilgrim's Farm to see a potential client. When he arrives at the house, he gets the feeling that he has been there before. Once inside, he meets a group of people who seem oddly familiar. He tells them that he has dreamt about each one of them and begins to list events that occurred in the dream. Walter's revelations begin a conversation amongst the group, and each person admits to having experienced a strange, unexplainable event.

Cast & Crew

Mervyn Johns
Walter Craig
Michael Redgrave
Maxwell Frere
Roland Culver
Eliot Foley
Frederick Valk
Dr. Van Straaten
Renee Gadd
Mrs. Craig
Anthony Baird
Hugh Grainger
Judy Kelly
Joyce Grainger
Miles Malleson
Hearse Driver
Sally Ann Howes
Sally O'Hara
John Baines
Screenwriter
Angus MacPhail
Screenwriter
Georges Auric
Original Music
Stanley Pavey
Cinematographer
Douglas Slocombe
Cinematographer
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News & Interviews for Dead of Night

Critic Reviews for Dead of Night

All Critics (43) | Top Critics (14) | Fresh (40) | Rotten (3)

Audience Reviews for Dead of Night

  • Sep 25, 2018
    It is a beautiful thing to see how this British anthology of horror stories is so eclectic and relies mostly on an intelligent dialogue, having completely influenced the genre ever since and offering us five tales ranging from spooky to funny to chilling to creepy as hell.
    Carlos M Super Reviewer
  • Mar 07, 2012
    A super-psycho-natural flick. For a 1945 flick, the scripting seems quite advanced. Not the best, but definitely worth a watch (and maybe even more entertaining if you can resist looking for plot-holes).
    familiar s Super Reviewer
  • Feb 10, 2011
    Many of the reviews I've read over the years of "Dead of Night" seem to sideline the "Christmas Party" episode as being less successful and effective than the other stories involved. At first, I tended to agree with them; however, after a while it dawned on me that there was something rather unusual about the sequence that I couldn't quite place my finger on. Normally, in a ghost story, any part of the story containing the appearance of the ghost looks rather unreal in comparison with the everyday part to underline the supernatural aspect of the spectre's apparition. However, in this particular story, it's the (real) children's party that looks unreal, and the (supernatural) ghost that looks real. The party shows a massive house, with a roaring log fire, loads of toys, food, etc, and the children enjoying themselves enormously, without any adults present. It has the look of a fantasy of the perfect party any child would want. However, the meeting with the young boy seems more rooted in reality, and this is the irony of the story - that Constance Kent, the sister he mentions, actually did exist and did admit to killing her younger brother. In real life, the boy was actually a baby when he was murdered, but his age has obviously been changed so that Sally could talk to him. This gives an extra poignancy to the story, in that he likes Sally and presumably would have wanted her for his real sister, but instead had Constance, who killed him - the worst crime she could have committed against a helpless child. I think it would be wrong to overlook this sequence as unworthy of comment, and reassess its value in "Dead of Night". It may not be as frightening as the famed ventriloquist story, but it does carry an emotional power which is perhaps its strongest point.
    Cassandra M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 13, 2011
    The horror potmanteau that spwaned them all which, today, is still the best. Five short stories and a linking narrative, varying from dark to light to very dark. Many later British horror portmanteaus, particularly by Amicus, trace their roots back to this excellent picture. Ground breaking.
    The S Super Reviewer

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