The Invisible Man Reviews

  • Nov 02, 2020

    With Laughs and Frightening Premises, "The Invisible Man" asserts itself as a Classic and a Masterpiece of Horror/Monster Cinema.

    With Laughs and Frightening Premises, "The Invisible Man" asserts itself as a Classic and a Masterpiece of Horror/Monster Cinema.

  • Oct 27, 2020

    Check out my YouTube video about my top 10 favorite movies of the 1930s: https://youtu.be/JVRGgEJYE-A

    Check out my YouTube video about my top 10 favorite movies of the 1930s: https://youtu.be/JVRGgEJYE-A

  • Oct 21, 2020

    With reserved, revolutionary effects for its time as well as a proper handle on its story, The Invisible Man is reasonably Universal's most intelligent of their classic monsters.

    With reserved, revolutionary effects for its time as well as a proper handle on its story, The Invisible Man is reasonably Universal's most intelligent of their classic monsters.

  • Oct 16, 2020

    A mad manhunt full of whimsy and murder. James Whale's science-fiction horror drama The Invisible Man (1933) is a delightful journey into unknown realms of science gone wrong into a dreamy crime spree. It remains one of my personal favorite films from Universal's classic monster movies alongside Bela Lugosi's Dracula. Whale's direction is peerless as he conjures up dark, dreamy direction for a comically enacted police investigation into horror scenes fit for any great horror picture. The wintery opening leading into the big reveal of The Invisible Man's face is brilliant. The Invisible Man is James Whale's finest direction and a timeless horror classic for sci-fi fanatics to enjoy as well! I adore Claude Rain's eccentric and excitable performance as the deranged Dr. Jack Griffin, also known as The Invisible Man. His dry British humor and pompous voice are turned to chilling threats, lunatic ravings, and gleeful mischief. His expressive body language and lively vocal performance make The Invisible Man the perfect role for the deliriously fun Claude Rains. He is truly astounding here up there with Bela Lugosi's incarnation of Dracula. Gloria Stuart is lovely and sympathetic as Griffin's girlfriend Flora Cranley. Her sincere love for Griffin is nice to see, especially when she turns away a gross suitor in favor of her love. William Harrigan is such a jerk as Dr. Arthur Kemp. His backstabbing behavior of hitting on his colleague's girlfriend is so pathetic and makes you hate him instantly. He's also funny as he is forced to be The Invisible Man's accomplice in crime against his will by Claude Rains' cunning threats. Henry Travers is nice and likable as the foolish Dr. Cranley. Una O'Connor is hilarious as the barkeeper's hysterical wife Jenny Hall. Forrester Harvey is funny as the portly barkeep Herbert Hall. The rest of the supporting cast are all funny or interesting in their short roles. Dwight Frye cameos as a reporter and John Carradine cameos as the informant who suggests using ink to see The Invisible Man. I am still impressed with Rosswell J. Hoffmann's special effects of splicing together frames and cutting out Claude Rains' body to create the invisibility effect. Ted J. Kent has to be one of the greatest editors who ever lived on the basis of The Invisible Man alone. Arthur Edeson's cinematography is beautiful with clever wide shots and close-ups perfectly framed to not break the illusion of where Claude Rains is really. All the bandage make-up and costumes are very neat. His shades are iconic unto themselves. Heinz Roemheld's musical score is fittingly exciting, dark, mysterious, and whimsical like The Invisible Man himself. He adds a fun tone and moody atmosphere to the entire picture. H. G. Wells' sci-fi story about an ambitious scientist turning himself invisible, only to go mad and embark upon a deranged crime spree is fascinating. The ethics of experimentation and the psychological effect of a man made invisible are interesting, but all the ways one could live without people seeing is frightening. R.C. Sherriff's script is fun with plenty of jokes at the expense of police and townsfolk unable to grasp a way to view The Invisible Man. The mad ravings of The Invisible Man are brilliant monologues that stand the test of time. It's a phenomenal film to this day. The Invisible Man is a must watch creature feature from Universal.

    A mad manhunt full of whimsy and murder. James Whale's science-fiction horror drama The Invisible Man (1933) is a delightful journey into unknown realms of science gone wrong into a dreamy crime spree. It remains one of my personal favorite films from Universal's classic monster movies alongside Bela Lugosi's Dracula. Whale's direction is peerless as he conjures up dark, dreamy direction for a comically enacted police investigation into horror scenes fit for any great horror picture. The wintery opening leading into the big reveal of The Invisible Man's face is brilliant. The Invisible Man is James Whale's finest direction and a timeless horror classic for sci-fi fanatics to enjoy as well! I adore Claude Rain's eccentric and excitable performance as the deranged Dr. Jack Griffin, also known as The Invisible Man. His dry British humor and pompous voice are turned to chilling threats, lunatic ravings, and gleeful mischief. His expressive body language and lively vocal performance make The Invisible Man the perfect role for the deliriously fun Claude Rains. He is truly astounding here up there with Bela Lugosi's incarnation of Dracula. Gloria Stuart is lovely and sympathetic as Griffin's girlfriend Flora Cranley. Her sincere love for Griffin is nice to see, especially when she turns away a gross suitor in favor of her love. William Harrigan is such a jerk as Dr. Arthur Kemp. His backstabbing behavior of hitting on his colleague's girlfriend is so pathetic and makes you hate him instantly. He's also funny as he is forced to be The Invisible Man's accomplice in crime against his will by Claude Rains' cunning threats. Henry Travers is nice and likable as the foolish Dr. Cranley. Una O'Connor is hilarious as the barkeeper's hysterical wife Jenny Hall. Forrester Harvey is funny as the portly barkeep Herbert Hall. The rest of the supporting cast are all funny or interesting in their short roles. Dwight Frye cameos as a reporter and John Carradine cameos as the informant who suggests using ink to see The Invisible Man. I am still impressed with Rosswell J. Hoffmann's special effects of splicing together frames and cutting out Claude Rains' body to create the invisibility effect. Ted J. Kent has to be one of the greatest editors who ever lived on the basis of The Invisible Man alone. Arthur Edeson's cinematography is beautiful with clever wide shots and close-ups perfectly framed to not break the illusion of where Claude Rains is really. All the bandage make-up and costumes are very neat. His shades are iconic unto themselves. Heinz Roemheld's musical score is fittingly exciting, dark, mysterious, and whimsical like The Invisible Man himself. He adds a fun tone and moody atmosphere to the entire picture. H. G. Wells' sci-fi story about an ambitious scientist turning himself invisible, only to go mad and embark upon a deranged crime spree is fascinating. The ethics of experimentation and the psychological effect of a man made invisible are interesting, but all the ways one could live without people seeing is frightening. R.C. Sherriff's script is fun with plenty of jokes at the expense of police and townsfolk unable to grasp a way to view The Invisible Man. The mad ravings of The Invisible Man are brilliant monologues that stand the test of time. It's a phenomenal film to this day. The Invisible Man is a must watch creature feature from Universal.

  • Oct 14, 2020

    Fun, goofy, and tense (by 1933 standards)

    Fun, goofy, and tense (by 1933 standards)

  • Sep 29, 2020

    Over the years this movie just keeps growing in esteem for me, to become probably my favorite of the classic monster flicks. Whale's wicked sense of humour, coupled with Rains' dynamic performance, and topped with effects that are still impressive almost 90 years later?! All these things combine to make an endlessly entertaining film. I always get such a kick out of the Invisible Man cackling maniacally as he slowly descends into madness.

    Over the years this movie just keeps growing in esteem for me, to become probably my favorite of the classic monster flicks. Whale's wicked sense of humour, coupled with Rains' dynamic performance, and topped with effects that are still impressive almost 90 years later?! All these things combine to make an endlessly entertaining film. I always get such a kick out of the Invisible Man cackling maniacally as he slowly descends into madness.

  • Sep 28, 2020

    An absolutely brilliant horror movie introducing one of the Universal Monsters' most unique characters. The Invisible Man has amazing special effects and an interesting story just as good as James Whale's other horror masterpiece Bride of Frankenstein.

    An absolutely brilliant horror movie introducing one of the Universal Monsters' most unique characters. The Invisible Man has amazing special effects and an interesting story just as good as James Whale's other horror masterpiece Bride of Frankenstein.

  • Sep 20, 2020

    Unique among the early monster classics by promoting a signature antagonist characterized with some attribute beyond a general malicious intent (Universal having ironically reduced one of the more compelling classic monsters of literature, Frankenstein's monster, to a series of grunts). The character is malicious but oddly humorous, using his signature power to commit both murders and childish pranks, the result of his claimed madness. Still, the unseen and unscrupulous nature of Rains' Griffin does allow for considerable tension and mystique around the character, and I'd be lying if I said that the fact that the character hasn't developed the fame of other villains like Frankenstein's monster or Dracula does make a first time watching less predictable. The surprisingly good effects for the period do add to the quality of the picture. (3.5/5)

    Unique among the early monster classics by promoting a signature antagonist characterized with some attribute beyond a general malicious intent (Universal having ironically reduced one of the more compelling classic monsters of literature, Frankenstein's monster, to a series of grunts). The character is malicious but oddly humorous, using his signature power to commit both murders and childish pranks, the result of his claimed madness. Still, the unseen and unscrupulous nature of Rains' Griffin does allow for considerable tension and mystique around the character, and I'd be lying if I said that the fact that the character hasn't developed the fame of other villains like Frankenstein's monster or Dracula does make a first time watching less predictable. The surprisingly good effects for the period do add to the quality of the picture. (3.5/5)

  • Sep 07, 2020

    Surprisingly tense, interesting, and with great special effects, considering how old the film is. It's about a man who concocts and chemical mixture that makes him invisible, causing him to plot all sorts of mischief.

    Surprisingly tense, interesting, and with great special effects, considering how old the film is. It's about a man who concocts and chemical mixture that makes him invisible, causing him to plot all sorts of mischief.

  • Aug 16, 2020

    A nice blend of comedy with some atmospheric horror, its a classic.

    A nice blend of comedy with some atmospheric horror, its a classic.