Reviews

  • Aug 15, 2021

    A gigantic re-telling of the freedom of slaves from Egypt. Let my people go!

    A gigantic re-telling of the freedom of slaves from Egypt. Let my people go!

  • Jul 31, 2021

    The greatest spectacle that has ever been seen.

    The greatest spectacle that has ever been seen.

  • May 07, 2021

    I'm not religious but I found this Hollywood production of a Biblical tale from the era of peak Studio filmmaking to be wildly entertaining. It's lavish production values filled up the screen in practically every shot and the special effects were fantastic and craftsmanlike in this time before computer generated effects. It really complemented the story and the characters in ways that our modern day filmmakers could learn a lot from.

    I'm not religious but I found this Hollywood production of a Biblical tale from the era of peak Studio filmmaking to be wildly entertaining. It's lavish production values filled up the screen in practically every shot and the special effects were fantastic and craftsmanlike in this time before computer generated effects. It really complemented the story and the characters in ways that our modern day filmmakers could learn a lot from.

  • May 03, 2021

    Regarded as one of the finest epics ever to grace the cinema screen, The Ten Commandments was Cecile B. DeMille's final film, and the one he is arguably best known for. In many ways its aged poorly. The dialogue is hammy, the acting feels stagey and the fight scenes are 1950s through and through. The film also suffers from an excessive runtime and a very uneven pace. The beginning of the film, which introduces the main characters and establishes their connections is the most enjoyable part. Moses' journey in the desert and his transformation into a liberator is good too, but the section where he comes back to confront Rameses has very little momentum and seems to go on forever. It feels more like a childish game of one-upmanship than it does a bid to free slaves from bondage, and when the exodus does eventually begin, even that seems to last a lifetime. It's probably not worth pointing out holes in the story, since it's based on biblical accounts, and therefore there's not much you can do if you want to tell the story we're all familiar with. Also, the titular commandments don't play much of a role in the film, since they only appear in the last 10 minutes when things are already wrapping up. If I was going to recommend the film for any reason, it would be to witness its incredible scale. With thousands of extras, both animal and human, it does an incredible job of capturing the sheer size of an Egyptian city in full swing. Everything about it, from the scope of the story to the number of characters to the enormity of the sets screams ‘Hollywood epic'. It has it's issues, and its length and pacing make it an unlikely candidate for repeat viewings, but it's much vaunted grandiosity is good enough reason to see it at least once.

    Regarded as one of the finest epics ever to grace the cinema screen, The Ten Commandments was Cecile B. DeMille's final film, and the one he is arguably best known for. In many ways its aged poorly. The dialogue is hammy, the acting feels stagey and the fight scenes are 1950s through and through. The film also suffers from an excessive runtime and a very uneven pace. The beginning of the film, which introduces the main characters and establishes their connections is the most enjoyable part. Moses' journey in the desert and his transformation into a liberator is good too, but the section where he comes back to confront Rameses has very little momentum and seems to go on forever. It feels more like a childish game of one-upmanship than it does a bid to free slaves from bondage, and when the exodus does eventually begin, even that seems to last a lifetime. It's probably not worth pointing out holes in the story, since it's based on biblical accounts, and therefore there's not much you can do if you want to tell the story we're all familiar with. Also, the titular commandments don't play much of a role in the film, since they only appear in the last 10 minutes when things are already wrapping up. If I was going to recommend the film for any reason, it would be to witness its incredible scale. With thousands of extras, both animal and human, it does an incredible job of capturing the sheer size of an Egyptian city in full swing. Everything about it, from the scope of the story to the number of characters to the enormity of the sets screams ‘Hollywood epic'. It has it's issues, and its length and pacing make it an unlikely candidate for repeat viewings, but it's much vaunted grandiosity is good enough reason to see it at least once.

  • May 03, 2021

    Weighed down by the quality of its acting but shining in its production, scope, and ambition, Cecil B. DeMille's own remake of this beloved millennia-old story shows Hollywood at its most prestigious during the '50s.

    Weighed down by the quality of its acting but shining in its production, scope, and ambition, Cecil B. DeMille's own remake of this beloved millennia-old story shows Hollywood at its most prestigious during the '50s.

  • Apr 02, 2021

    Overall, I found it very boring. The dialogue badly written. However the sceenplay and the beautiful colour was very impressive for its time. The acting is stilted and by numbers, like people making speeches. Often I felt like I was watching a badly acted play.

    Overall, I found it very boring. The dialogue badly written. However the sceenplay and the beautiful colour was very impressive for its time. The acting is stilted and by numbers, like people making speeches. Often I felt like I was watching a badly acted play.

  • Apr 01, 2021

    Lot can be said about the film that turned Moses into an American icon back in the 50s. The ten commandments is simply one of the most epic films of all time in the same likes as Ben Hur and Lawrence of Arabia. Is a classic and Cecil b Demiles remake of his original black and white version of the exodus. In here Charlton Heston plays Moses alongside Yul Brynner as Ramses in an adaptation of one of the bibles most iconic stories. This movie is pure spectacle with demille being the king of spectacle in the golden age of cinema with large sets, hundreds of extras, and special effects. This movie won an academy award for its effects which were revolutionary at the time with no CGI and the parting of the red sea is one of the most incredible scenes in movie history impressing to this day. Charlton Heston gives a powerful performance as Moses and Yul Brynner is demanding and impressive as Pharaoh. The two machos battling out on screen is simply magnificent. The movie expands on the biblical story filling the gaps with melodrama that helps tell the story but is quite funny and silly today. Anne Baxter as Nefertiri is exquisite as the feme fatale of the story. The movie is over 3 hours long but is fun enough that it does not feel bogged down. The movie is respectful of the source material and is a religious movie through and through. A classic of american cinema and a masterpiece.

    Lot can be said about the film that turned Moses into an American icon back in the 50s. The ten commandments is simply one of the most epic films of all time in the same likes as Ben Hur and Lawrence of Arabia. Is a classic and Cecil b Demiles remake of his original black and white version of the exodus. In here Charlton Heston plays Moses alongside Yul Brynner as Ramses in an adaptation of one of the bibles most iconic stories. This movie is pure spectacle with demille being the king of spectacle in the golden age of cinema with large sets, hundreds of extras, and special effects. This movie won an academy award for its effects which were revolutionary at the time with no CGI and the parting of the red sea is one of the most incredible scenes in movie history impressing to this day. Charlton Heston gives a powerful performance as Moses and Yul Brynner is demanding and impressive as Pharaoh. The two machos battling out on screen is simply magnificent. The movie expands on the biblical story filling the gaps with melodrama that helps tell the story but is quite funny and silly today. Anne Baxter as Nefertiri is exquisite as the feme fatale of the story. The movie is over 3 hours long but is fun enough that it does not feel bogged down. The movie is respectful of the source material and is a religious movie through and through. A classic of american cinema and a masterpiece.

  • Mar 15, 2021

    It's a beautiful peace of movie art by itself. However, under a Christian or Jewish lens, its a fundamental movie to compose the intellectual repository about the history of Israel and Hebrew people.

    It's a beautiful peace of movie art by itself. However, under a Christian or Jewish lens, its a fundamental movie to compose the intellectual repository about the history of Israel and Hebrew people.

  • Jan 24, 2021

    Cecil B. DeMille's 1956 remake of his original silent film, The Ten Commandments, is the prime example for epic storytelling. Its characters, story, cinematography and drama are truly something to behold and worth its almost four hour runtime.

    Cecil B. DeMille's 1956 remake of his original silent film, The Ten Commandments, is the prime example for epic storytelling. Its characters, story, cinematography and drama are truly something to behold and worth its almost four hour runtime.

  • Dec 17, 2020

    The most incredible technical achievement in cinema that had been released to date is also a masterpiece of overacting and melodrama. Amazingly colorful and vibrant, with massive practical sets that remain impressive today, but nuance goes completely out the window in virtually all performances in an attempt to give 'powerful' renditions of Biblical characters, apart from Baxter as Nefretiri and Robinson as Dathan. In 1950's American drive-ins, you can absolutely see it all coming together, convinced that what they just witnessed was the pinnacle of filmmaking. With the film as visually enticing as it is, the length is actually not terribly unwieldy, but when the technical accomplishments can be condensed into a highlight reel of a few minutes, and with the hypertraditional interpretation of the source material, it's no wonder that DeMille's formidably sized classic that captured the minds of a generation no longer receives much attention apart from film buffs and retirees around holidays. (3.5/5)

    The most incredible technical achievement in cinema that had been released to date is also a masterpiece of overacting and melodrama. Amazingly colorful and vibrant, with massive practical sets that remain impressive today, but nuance goes completely out the window in virtually all performances in an attempt to give 'powerful' renditions of Biblical characters, apart from Baxter as Nefretiri and Robinson as Dathan. In 1950's American drive-ins, you can absolutely see it all coming together, convinced that what they just witnessed was the pinnacle of filmmaking. With the film as visually enticing as it is, the length is actually not terribly unwieldy, but when the technical accomplishments can be condensed into a highlight reel of a few minutes, and with the hypertraditional interpretation of the source material, it's no wonder that DeMille's formidably sized classic that captured the minds of a generation no longer receives much attention apart from film buffs and retirees around holidays. (3.5/5)