Head (1968)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

The Monkees -- Mickey Dolenz, Mike Nesmith, Davey Jones, and Peter Tork -- didn't really enjoy being labelled the pre-Fab Four. They expressed their displeasure in this non-sequitur masterpiece. This film literally has no plot; it is instead a patchwork of loopy sight gags, instant parodies, and musical numbers.
Rating:
PG
Genre:
Comedy , Documentary
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Columbia Pictures

Cast

Peter Tork
as Himself
Davy Jones
as Himself
Micky Dolenz
as Himself
Frank Zappa
as The Critic
Victor Mature
as The Big Victor
Teri Garr
as Testy True
Timothy Carey
as Lord High 'n' Low
Logan Ramsey
as Officer Faye Lapid
Vito Scotti
as I. Vitteloni
Charles Macaulay
as Inspector Shrink
T.C. Jones
as Mr. And Mrs. Ace
Charles Irving
as Mayor Feedback
William Bagdad
as Black Sheik
Percy Helton
as Heraldic Messenger
Ray Nitschke
as Private One
Carol Doda
as Sally Silicone
June Fairchild
as The Jumper
I.J. Jefferson
as Lady Pleasure
Mike Burns
as Nothing
Kristine Helstoski
as Girl Friend
John Hoffman
as The Sex Fiend
Linda Weaver
as Lever Secretary
Jim Hanley
as Siderf
Toni Basil
as Davey's Dance Partner (uncredited)
Tiger Joe Marsh
as Security Guard (uncredited)
Helena Kallianiotes
as Belly Dancer (uncredited0
Dennis Hopper
as Himself (uncredited)
Jack Nicholson
as Himself (uncredited)
Bob Rafelson
as Himself (uncredited)
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Critic Reviews for Head

All Critics (20) | Top Critics (5)

The clean-cut kids and the created kinetics work up a 'so-what' reaction too soon in the 85-minute stretch seques from war to westerns to desert chases to mad scientist brushes in the Columbia lot.

Full Review… | May 16, 2008
Variety
Top Critic

Despite obviously dated aspects like clumsy psychedelic effects and some turgid slapstick sequences, the film is still remarkably vital and entertaining.

Full Review… | February 8, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

The movie is, nonetheless, of a certain fascination in its joining of two styles: pot and advertising.

Full Review… | May 21, 2005
New York Times
Top Critic

Sometimes it succeeds.

Full Review… | October 23, 2004
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

It's uneven but mostly a blast.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

In which The Monkees get stoned, commit career suicide, and end up accidentally making one of the best movies of the 1960s.

Full Review… | March 14, 2012
Popcornworld

Audience Reviews for Head

½

The Pre-Fab Four's flat out denial of their pop superstar crown, their biting the hand that feeds them, seemingly aimless and without direction, but actually filled that same. None of their well known pop standards are here, but rather some intriguing new songs, some in the vein of (gasp!) Pink Floyd at the same time! You'll either get it or you won't, love it ... or leave it. It's a masterpiece in my opinion. Look for Frank Zappa advising the late Davy Jones to work more on his music and less on his dancing (Jones has an beautiful dance routine here).

Kevin M. Williams
Kevin M. Williams

Super Reviewer

i think it probably helps to be high during this but it is a fun ride

Stella Dallas
Stella Dallas

Super Reviewer

½

Head really shines as the anti-Hard Day's Night. It takes all the pointlessness and over the top cinema verite and makes a complete mockery of it. This is so fragmented, so conceptual and so bizarre that most people won't know what they've just watched. However, this Is one of the most well done and certainly the most original movie about a band that's ever been made. It actually never focuses on the music itself, which is absolutely hilarious. While it's in the background, at no point is this movie supposed to be concerned about its stars or their music. Bob Rafelson's complete mind trip is circular and complex in nature, but extremely fun to watch and fascinating if nothing else.

Conner Rainwater
Conner Rainwater

Super Reviewer

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