A Most Violent Year Reviews

  • Aug 10, 2019

    I had been wanting to see this one for a couple of years, but never got around to it. I ended up feeling like it was a bit underwhelming and even somewhat pretentious.Although the acting was solid throughout, the regional competition and tax problems that the film revolved around just never motivated me to care so much. I felt like the movie never lived up to its name and it was more of a ruse than an actual violent gangster flick, which is what I has assumed it was going to be, albeit without watching any trailers or reading a plot synopsis, but just off the styling of the main character. It was a moderately violent year at most.

    I had been wanting to see this one for a couple of years, but never got around to it. I ended up feeling like it was a bit underwhelming and even somewhat pretentious.Although the acting was solid throughout, the regional competition and tax problems that the film revolved around just never motivated me to care so much. I felt like the movie never lived up to its name and it was more of a ruse than an actual violent gangster flick, which is what I has assumed it was going to be, albeit without watching any trailers or reading a plot synopsis, but just off the styling of the main character. It was a moderately violent year at most.

  • Aug 09, 2019

    It's not that there's anything wrong with the idea behind this movie, and the acting and cinematography are excellent. It's just too slow to end up with little to no point justifying its existence. The stakes are always murkily abstract and the main characters don't even seem to know how to accomplish them. Each potential solution is introduced almost immediately before being resolved, so the whole movie seems like its treading water. Closest comparison: It's like Wall Street (1987) by way of Inside Llewyn Davis. Setting: Business Drama Plot: Difficult Times Tone: Slow Burn Drama

    It's not that there's anything wrong with the idea behind this movie, and the acting and cinematography are excellent. It's just too slow to end up with little to no point justifying its existence. The stakes are always murkily abstract and the main characters don't even seem to know how to accomplish them. Each potential solution is introduced almost immediately before being resolved, so the whole movie seems like its treading water. Closest comparison: It's like Wall Street (1987) by way of Inside Llewyn Davis. Setting: Business Drama Plot: Difficult Times Tone: Slow Burn Drama

  • Jul 15, 2019

    Gripping, powerful and fueled by strong performances by Oscar Issac, Jessica Chastain, David Oyelowo and Albert Brooks. A Most Violent Year is destined to become a modern cinematic masterpiece.

    Gripping, powerful and fueled by strong performances by Oscar Issac, Jessica Chastain, David Oyelowo and Albert Brooks. A Most Violent Year is destined to become a modern cinematic masterpiece.

  • Jun 18, 2019

    an interesting enough story that is elevated by an excellent peoformance by Oscar Isaac

    an interesting enough story that is elevated by an excellent peoformance by Oscar Isaac

  • May 21, 2019

    Written and directed by J.C. Chandor (All Is Lost), A Most Violent Year follows Abel Morales (Oscar Issac), the owner of a rising heating and oil company in New York City in 1981, as he fights to maintain his innocence among competitive and judicial pressures. An absorbing and thought-provoking slow burn, A Most Violent Year favors character development over more-sensationalistic story beats. Oscar Issac is sensational as the lone clean businessman in a corrupt city, while fellow Juilliard alum Jessica Chastain and the always-reliable Albert Brooks also deliver Award-worthy performances. With a tone and style reminiscent of fellow New York City masterpiece Serpico, it is suiting that A Most Violent Year finds Issac channeling Al Pacino at the height of his career to deliver a performance that is both charismatic and gritty, both brazen and reserved.

    Written and directed by J.C. Chandor (All Is Lost), A Most Violent Year follows Abel Morales (Oscar Issac), the owner of a rising heating and oil company in New York City in 1981, as he fights to maintain his innocence among competitive and judicial pressures. An absorbing and thought-provoking slow burn, A Most Violent Year favors character development over more-sensationalistic story beats. Oscar Issac is sensational as the lone clean businessman in a corrupt city, while fellow Juilliard alum Jessica Chastain and the always-reliable Albert Brooks also deliver Award-worthy performances. With a tone and style reminiscent of fellow New York City masterpiece Serpico, it is suiting that A Most Violent Year finds Issac channeling Al Pacino at the height of his career to deliver a performance that is both charismatic and gritty, both brazen and reserved.

  • Apr 11, 2019

    A dark and depressing film but incredible at the same time!

    A dark and depressing film but incredible at the same time!

  • Dec 22, 2018

    In the opening credits, one of the actors' names is mis-spelled. The late David Margulies, a fine veteran character actor, is shown as David Marguiles.

    In the opening credits, one of the actors' names is mis-spelled. The late David Margulies, a fine veteran character actor, is shown as David Marguiles.

  • Dec 18, 2018

    Slow and anticlimactic

    Slow and anticlimactic

  • Dec 15, 2018

    Compelling, intense and thought provoking. The main character has to make tough decisions about how to handle himself when corruption is running rampant around him - intriguing to see these dilemmas play out.

    Compelling, intense and thought provoking. The main character has to make tough decisions about how to handle himself when corruption is running rampant around him - intriguing to see these dilemmas play out.

  • Sep 26, 2018

    A third act that is weak and feels rushed drags down an otherwise great movie with great performances.

    A third act that is weak and feels rushed drags down an otherwise great movie with great performances.