The Abyss Reviews

  • MAry G
    4d ago

    Great story, realistic depictions of the action, good actors. Film quality not so good but it's an old film.

    Great story, realistic depictions of the action, good actors. Film quality not so good but it's an old film.

  • Sep 13, 2019

    I kept having to remind myself to breathe.

    I kept having to remind myself to breathe.

  • Sep 13, 2019

    Cameron understands each individual emotion so perfectly, almost humanly, that you have to give in. The Abyss James Cameron's another sci-fi adventure surprisingly doesn't resemble with Ridley Scott's Alien but Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters Of The Third Kind; I know that's a lot of name drops, but I am going to try and write about the film with as many references as possible. Like how the film also resembles with Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later in the sense that nature doesn't behave as an evil entity (just as Anne Hathaway whispers it beautifully in Interstellar) but by the humans at the point of crisis. And it is simply moving to see a visual galore like such, fit in both socially and politically. Usually you'd have to enter a different screening for that amount of drama. Speaking of drama, Cameron is monetizing the film by doing something impossible even for now, I am not even going over the fact at what year was this released. Perhaps this has always been his style or motto or identity, he has always been ahead of both the technology and expectations of a movie goer. If he has kept his arms tied on pushing the boundaries as a narrator, he certainly directs then, all his guns towards the embroidery of that iconic fabric. While making such green screen CGI mashup, Spielberg has always said that he prioritizes his animation on having emotional bond with the audience. And Cameron with his wit is weaving a nail-biting drama from such technical aspects that you wouldn't expect it to be anything beyond a distraction or a matter of panache. There is celebration with that technology, but surfing for almost three hours, he terrorizes the textual communication that we are told, comes from The Abyss. Now walking in the dark alone is really scary, but someone or something strange present in that darkness is on a whole new level.

    Cameron understands each individual emotion so perfectly, almost humanly, that you have to give in. The Abyss James Cameron's another sci-fi adventure surprisingly doesn't resemble with Ridley Scott's Alien but Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters Of The Third Kind; I know that's a lot of name drops, but I am going to try and write about the film with as many references as possible. Like how the film also resembles with Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later in the sense that nature doesn't behave as an evil entity (just as Anne Hathaway whispers it beautifully in Interstellar) but by the humans at the point of crisis. And it is simply moving to see a visual galore like such, fit in both socially and politically. Usually you'd have to enter a different screening for that amount of drama. Speaking of drama, Cameron is monetizing the film by doing something impossible even for now, I am not even going over the fact at what year was this released. Perhaps this has always been his style or motto or identity, he has always been ahead of both the technology and expectations of a movie goer. If he has kept his arms tied on pushing the boundaries as a narrator, he certainly directs then, all his guns towards the embroidery of that iconic fabric. While making such green screen CGI mashup, Spielberg has always said that he prioritizes his animation on having emotional bond with the audience. And Cameron with his wit is weaving a nail-biting drama from such technical aspects that you wouldn't expect it to be anything beyond a distraction or a matter of panache. There is celebration with that technology, but surfing for almost three hours, he terrorizes the textual communication that we are told, comes from The Abyss. Now walking in the dark alone is really scary, but someone or something strange present in that darkness is on a whole new level.

  • Aug 28, 2019

    Though it was hell to work on for the cast and crew, The Abyss worked out to be an entertaining and visually impressive sci-fi thriller from James Cameron that is very well-crafted from its practical effects to its computer effects. It does a great job at creating a claustrophobic atmosphere, and has pretty good performances and a suspenseful narrative.

    Though it was hell to work on for the cast and crew, The Abyss worked out to be an entertaining and visually impressive sci-fi thriller from James Cameron that is very well-crafted from its practical effects to its computer effects. It does a great job at creating a claustrophobic atmosphere, and has pretty good performances and a suspenseful narrative.

  • Aug 13, 2019

    What ultimately saves the first hour of the film are the phenomenal and impressive Oscar-winning VFX (they are truly way ahead of there time) and a couple of creative ideas we see every now and then, for I found it lacking the emotional impact, suspense and the interesting characters other Cameron's films are known for. Actually, the first hour is basically a show of Cameron's trademarks and nothing but. Even the plot is incoherent and barely make sense. For all that, I was 100% percent sure there's no way I could like this film. After the first four, The Abyss took a turn for the better. the suspense gradually increased till it reached its peak at the third act. Likewise, with the help of a desirable and palpable chemistry between Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, the characters became more and more interesting. When the film went for the full sentimentality and cheesiness by the end, everything worked for me, and I was thoroughly engrossed. And I think there's no better proof that I cared about the two lead characters by the end than that. P.S. the CPR Scene is one of the most emotionally intense scenes I've seen in a Cameron film, nay, in any film! (7/10)

    What ultimately saves the first hour of the film are the phenomenal and impressive Oscar-winning VFX (they are truly way ahead of there time) and a couple of creative ideas we see every now and then, for I found it lacking the emotional impact, suspense and the interesting characters other Cameron's films are known for. Actually, the first hour is basically a show of Cameron's trademarks and nothing but. Even the plot is incoherent and barely make sense. For all that, I was 100% percent sure there's no way I could like this film. After the first four, The Abyss took a turn for the better. the suspense gradually increased till it reached its peak at the third act. Likewise, with the help of a desirable and palpable chemistry between Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, the characters became more and more interesting. When the film went for the full sentimentality and cheesiness by the end, everything worked for me, and I was thoroughly engrossed. And I think there's no better proof that I cared about the two lead characters by the end than that. P.S. the CPR Scene is one of the most emotionally intense scenes I've seen in a Cameron film, nay, in any film! (7/10)

  • Aug 12, 2019

    The Abyss is a colorful and suspenseful success from James Cameron. Just watch out for the scenes where the characters talk to one another.

    The Abyss is a colorful and suspenseful success from James Cameron. Just watch out for the scenes where the characters talk to one another.

  • Jul 23, 2019

    Made 30 years ago, the Abyss is a non-stop action film with heart, intelligence and incredible creativity. I've been studying special effects ever since I first saw this movie as a 14 year old, and I don't think I could replicate the water tentacle with all today's modern software. What an incredible achievement.

    Made 30 years ago, the Abyss is a non-stop action film with heart, intelligence and incredible creativity. I've been studying special effects ever since I first saw this movie as a 14 year old, and I don't think I could replicate the water tentacle with all today's modern software. What an incredible achievement.

  • Jun 13, 2019

    Despite his duly (in)famous penchant for meticulous and cold filmmaking—and stories from the set of THE ABYSS (aka THE ABUSE aka SON OF ABYSS aka LIFE'S ABYSS AND THEN YOU DIVE) are no exception—Jim Cameron time and again reveals himself to be a romantic and a highly personal (if not personable) artist. Perhaps that paradoxical combination of dispassionate, technical headiness with an oversized heart is what makes Cameron's oeuvre, the mature phase of which begins here, so continuously compelling, and so easy to dismiss both ahead of time and out of hand. Whatever their blockbuster, popcorn appeal, his work ask a lot of the audience and crew alike—long runtimes, endless shoots, newfangled technologies, unexpected genres, idiosyncratic subjects—and in an era, concurrent with Cameron's filmography, when quickly made and utterly disposable content is the aesthetic norm, a film like THE ABYSS seems to have no place in the usual Hollywood machinery, and so audiences and critics expect, even want, it to fail. What to make, then, of a film when the making of which is a story just as full of drama, strangeness, idealism, and innovation as the final product? For in both cases, this is a film full of heart and passion, from start to finish, top to bottom, to a fault: Every frame drips with the time, energy, suffering, and money that the filmmakers poured into the production, with sets and shots that look like nothing else because nobody else has gone to such lengths to tell a story like this, even looking better (though murkier) three decades on than recent under-the-CGI efforts like AQUAMAN (with the rudimentary and sparse use of digital effects here holding up surprisingly well). The shoot may have been complete hell for all involved, and Cameron may very well be the devil—or at least a killer, emotionless, efficient cyborg—but the result is something of a miracle, not only in terms of the obviously incredible set design and effects, so impressive as to almost overwhelm everything else, but also that such a infernal shoot could coax such tender, hopeful performances. At the end of the day, because it is as much a human drama as it is a claustrophobic sci-fi thriller, the movie sinks or swims on the backs of its actors, not its production values; hence some of the most effective and memorable scenes are those with the fewest effects, the narrative boiled down to human relationships. Which is part of what makes the oft derided final act so strange, startling, and in my opinion, utterly compelling in a way that complements what has come before, albeit from an uncanny angle—for what are the depths of the ocean but the realm of Earth's great and true Other, the most alien environment with the most otherworldly life. From at least this point in his career on, Cameron will use the camera and everything else in his disposal (including actors) to take audiences places they have never been, places they could only imagine, places they couldn't even imagine imagining. This act of exploration and discovery is, for the director, the true essence of filmmaking: With TRUE LIES, his characters get to live out those cinematic fantasies; with TITANIC, the audience got taken into the past; with AVATAR, to another planet and another consciousness entirely. Perhaps if the aliens had been malevolent, some Leviathan hiding in the depths, critics would have been more accepting—certainly the praise for the director's cut, which adds those tones in the conclusion, speaks to that end—because it would have confirmed their expectations, it would have justified the building (and all too human) fear throughout the film, the anxiety of what swims beneath in the cold infinite dark; yet just for that same reason, because menacing aliens (or even none at all, just some monster out of Verne) would have merely corroborated generic tropes, the ending would be all the more out of place, like a fish out of water.

    Despite his duly (in)famous penchant for meticulous and cold filmmaking—and stories from the set of THE ABYSS (aka THE ABUSE aka SON OF ABYSS aka LIFE'S ABYSS AND THEN YOU DIVE) are no exception—Jim Cameron time and again reveals himself to be a romantic and a highly personal (if not personable) artist. Perhaps that paradoxical combination of dispassionate, technical headiness with an oversized heart is what makes Cameron's oeuvre, the mature phase of which begins here, so continuously compelling, and so easy to dismiss both ahead of time and out of hand. Whatever their blockbuster, popcorn appeal, his work ask a lot of the audience and crew alike—long runtimes, endless shoots, newfangled technologies, unexpected genres, idiosyncratic subjects—and in an era, concurrent with Cameron's filmography, when quickly made and utterly disposable content is the aesthetic norm, a film like THE ABYSS seems to have no place in the usual Hollywood machinery, and so audiences and critics expect, even want, it to fail. What to make, then, of a film when the making of which is a story just as full of drama, strangeness, idealism, and innovation as the final product? For in both cases, this is a film full of heart and passion, from start to finish, top to bottom, to a fault: Every frame drips with the time, energy, suffering, and money that the filmmakers poured into the production, with sets and shots that look like nothing else because nobody else has gone to such lengths to tell a story like this, even looking better (though murkier) three decades on than recent under-the-CGI efforts like AQUAMAN (with the rudimentary and sparse use of digital effects here holding up surprisingly well). The shoot may have been complete hell for all involved, and Cameron may very well be the devil—or at least a killer, emotionless, efficient cyborg—but the result is something of a miracle, not only in terms of the obviously incredible set design and effects, so impressive as to almost overwhelm everything else, but also that such a infernal shoot could coax such tender, hopeful performances. At the end of the day, because it is as much a human drama as it is a claustrophobic sci-fi thriller, the movie sinks or swims on the backs of its actors, not its production values; hence some of the most effective and memorable scenes are those with the fewest effects, the narrative boiled down to human relationships. Which is part of what makes the oft derided final act so strange, startling, and in my opinion, utterly compelling in a way that complements what has come before, albeit from an uncanny angle—for what are the depths of the ocean but the realm of Earth's great and true Other, the most alien environment with the most otherworldly life. From at least this point in his career on, Cameron will use the camera and everything else in his disposal (including actors) to take audiences places they have never been, places they could only imagine, places they couldn't even imagine imagining. This act of exploration and discovery is, for the director, the true essence of filmmaking: With TRUE LIES, his characters get to live out those cinematic fantasies; with TITANIC, the audience got taken into the past; with AVATAR, to another planet and another consciousness entirely. Perhaps if the aliens had been malevolent, some Leviathan hiding in the depths, critics would have been more accepting—certainly the praise for the director's cut, which adds those tones in the conclusion, speaks to that end—because it would have confirmed their expectations, it would have justified the building (and all too human) fear throughout the film, the anxiety of what swims beneath in the cold infinite dark; yet just for that same reason, because menacing aliens (or even none at all, just some monster out of Verne) would have merely corroborated generic tropes, the ending would be all the more out of place, like a fish out of water.

  • Jun 05, 2019

    One of the great SciFi films of our time.

    One of the great SciFi films of our time.

  • May 26, 2019

    God, what a nightmare it would be to be in a submarine for months on end. The claustrophobia would be so intense. I can tell this is going to be a good movie. Why is that scientist chick so cold and such a bitch? She needs to lighten up a bit. I love Ed Harris, he's a great actor and seems like he'd be a cool guy to hang out with. He's a real one. Real intense and suspenseful movie. You kind of don't know what's going to happen or how it's going to happen. The special effects are astounding. Especially considering the movie came out in 1989. It's incredible all the detail that went into making this movie. The movie was written so well, that there;s never a dull moment. There's things that happen during the movie that change what's going to happen next and I absolutely love that. It's always keeping you guessing and on your toes. The way Cameron was able to film all of those underwater sequences with such depth and realism is astounding. I can't even begin to imagine how they filmed all those underwater sequences and where. Did they literally film it in the ocean or tai they find a ginormous sized pool? That scene where they're trying to revive the chick was almost hard to watch. Really suspenseful. Intense. The movie got kind of really cutesy towards the end but it had a good heart. I was so surprised at how all the actors were able to dodge all the pipes and valves that sticked out of the rig station. That must have been annoying. You get a sense that the actors had to really feel like they were trapped in a rig that's thousand of feet deep underwater. They had to adapt to there surroundings and it shows in the movie. This movie seems like it was a nightmare to film. Good thing the end product was something amazing. Fantastic movie! A lot of thrills, a lot of suspense, a lot of action, a lot of water. Must watch.

    God, what a nightmare it would be to be in a submarine for months on end. The claustrophobia would be so intense. I can tell this is going to be a good movie. Why is that scientist chick so cold and such a bitch? She needs to lighten up a bit. I love Ed Harris, he's a great actor and seems like he'd be a cool guy to hang out with. He's a real one. Real intense and suspenseful movie. You kind of don't know what's going to happen or how it's going to happen. The special effects are astounding. Especially considering the movie came out in 1989. It's incredible all the detail that went into making this movie. The movie was written so well, that there;s never a dull moment. There's things that happen during the movie that change what's going to happen next and I absolutely love that. It's always keeping you guessing and on your toes. The way Cameron was able to film all of those underwater sequences with such depth and realism is astounding. I can't even begin to imagine how they filmed all those underwater sequences and where. Did they literally film it in the ocean or tai they find a ginormous sized pool? That scene where they're trying to revive the chick was almost hard to watch. Really suspenseful. Intense. The movie got kind of really cutesy towards the end but it had a good heart. I was so surprised at how all the actors were able to dodge all the pipes and valves that sticked out of the rig station. That must have been annoying. You get a sense that the actors had to really feel like they were trapped in a rig that's thousand of feet deep underwater. They had to adapt to there surroundings and it shows in the movie. This movie seems like it was a nightmare to film. Good thing the end product was something amazing. Fantastic movie! A lot of thrills, a lot of suspense, a lot of action, a lot of water. Must watch.