Away We Go Reviews

  • Mar 02, 2021

    Don't usually go in for these types of movies but it never dragged. It moved along as we met a cast of vastly different characters each living their own lives with their own set of positives and negatives.

    Don't usually go in for these types of movies but it never dragged. It moved along as we met a cast of vastly different characters each living their own lives with their own set of positives and negatives.

  • Feb 14, 2021

    With a baby due in three months, Burt and Verona (John Krasinski, Maya Rudolph) discover that Burt's parents, their only support in the area, are moving to Belgium a month before the due date. Realizing that they will be alone when the baby is born, they set off on a journey across North America, visiting friends and family, in an effort to find a new place to live. While the premise is ridiculous (especially considering that Verona is about to enter her third trimester) and virtually all of the characters they visit are strangely eccentric or comedically troubled, the movie actually works, thanks primarily to likeable performances from the leads and some clever dialogue along the way.

    With a baby due in three months, Burt and Verona (John Krasinski, Maya Rudolph) discover that Burt's parents, their only support in the area, are moving to Belgium a month before the due date. Realizing that they will be alone when the baby is born, they set off on a journey across North America, visiting friends and family, in an effort to find a new place to live. While the premise is ridiculous (especially considering that Verona is about to enter her third trimester) and virtually all of the characters they visit are strangely eccentric or comedically troubled, the movie actually works, thanks primarily to likeable performances from the leads and some clever dialogue along the way.

  • Sep 09, 2020

    This was always one of those movies that I felt stuck out like a sore thumb in Sam Mendes's filmography. It's not as if I feel he's above a movie like this, but when I think of Sam Mendes, I immediately think of his ability to deliver projects that are lofty in terms of scope, whether that loftiness is logistical (i.e. "Skyfall" or "1917") or thematic (i.e. "American Beauty" or "Revolutionary Road"). After watching "Away We Go," I can confirm that this definitely feels like the only movie in Mendes's filmography where his presence is wholly inconsequential. However, that doesn't make this a trying watch by any stretch. This feels like if Noah Baumbach snuck onto Sam Mendes's set and ghost-directed this movie on his behalf. The winning elements here are the screenplay by true-to-life partners Dave Eggers and Vandela Vida, and the charming lead turns from both John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph. Through each scene, you're presented with winsome humor, sweet chemistry between the leads and some truly profound insights into the many approaches one can have towards building a family. No tears were shed or anything, but as someone approaching a period of my life not unlike the one depicted here, I found it appropriately thought-provoking.

    This was always one of those movies that I felt stuck out like a sore thumb in Sam Mendes's filmography. It's not as if I feel he's above a movie like this, but when I think of Sam Mendes, I immediately think of his ability to deliver projects that are lofty in terms of scope, whether that loftiness is logistical (i.e. "Skyfall" or "1917") or thematic (i.e. "American Beauty" or "Revolutionary Road"). After watching "Away We Go," I can confirm that this definitely feels like the only movie in Mendes's filmography where his presence is wholly inconsequential. However, that doesn't make this a trying watch by any stretch. This feels like if Noah Baumbach snuck onto Sam Mendes's set and ghost-directed this movie on his behalf. The winning elements here are the screenplay by true-to-life partners Dave Eggers and Vandela Vida, and the charming lead turns from both John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph. Through each scene, you're presented with winsome humor, sweet chemistry between the leads and some truly profound insights into the many approaches one can have towards building a family. No tears were shed or anything, but as someone approaching a period of my life not unlike the one depicted here, I found it appropriately thought-provoking.

  • Sep 01, 2020

    You just gotta love good writing!! This movie was cute, heartfelt, painful and pertinent. The characters were real and right there. John and Maya were fantastic in their chemistry and portrayal. The fear of the journey and the destination as well as the romance of it was beautifully omnipresent in the movie without it being spoken about. Must watch.

    You just gotta love good writing!! This movie was cute, heartfelt, painful and pertinent. The characters were real and right there. John and Maya were fantastic in their chemistry and portrayal. The fear of the journey and the destination as well as the romance of it was beautifully omnipresent in the movie without it being spoken about. Must watch.

  • Jun 09, 2020

    not at all what you'd expect from a movie starring John krasinski and Maya Rudolph. Pretty slow but has a few good moments

    not at all what you'd expect from a movie starring John krasinski and Maya Rudolph. Pretty slow but has a few good moments

  • Apr 30, 2020

    Let me start off by saying the opening scene was very awkward seeing jim from the office do that . Now that that is out of the way I liked the concept it was something fresh . And the couple was already together so you didn’t have to worry about the typical romcom cliches . The jokes landed for the most part and you got to see a multitude of sceneries . 3.0 . Basically a movie about trying to find out where to move and getting a reason not to choose every place they visit . The Maggie g cameo with her husband was a highlight and reminds me of some hippies I know

    Let me start off by saying the opening scene was very awkward seeing jim from the office do that . Now that that is out of the way I liked the concept it was something fresh . And the couple was already together so you didn’t have to worry about the typical romcom cliches . The jokes landed for the most part and you got to see a multitude of sceneries . 3.0 . Basically a movie about trying to find out where to move and getting a reason not to choose every place they visit . The Maggie g cameo with her husband was a highlight and reminds me of some hippies I know

  • Feb 17, 2020

    Pretty awful. I gave up after the first half hour.

    Pretty awful. I gave up after the first half hour.

  • Nov 09, 2019

    Whew. Terrible acting, unbelievable storyline. How does this have such a high approval rating?

    Whew. Terrible acting, unbelievable storyline. How does this have such a high approval rating?

  • Sep 11, 2019

    Fantastic little indie film. As we follow a couple, through their struggle to cope with impending parenthood and to just find their place in the world. It's a real and refreshing look at a healthy couple.

    Fantastic little indie film. As we follow a couple, through their struggle to cope with impending parenthood and to just find their place in the world. It's a real and refreshing look at a healthy couple.

  • Jesse O Super Reviewer
    Jan 18, 2019

    I don't really know why I'm even starting with this, but I just saw the new trailer for Jordan Peele's Us (he wrote and directed Get Out, one of the best horror movies I've ever seen) and, now, I'm unbelievably pumped and excited for that one. I haven't gone to movie theaters in many, many years, but that's a movie I really would consider going to the theaters for. Ah, in a perfect world. Anyway, on to this, shall we? So, yea, I've never been a big fan of kids and the idea that some people try to drill into your mind that the idea of what a great life is is settling down, getting married to your sweetheart, having kids and growing old together. I hate that concept of happiness. You make your own happiness I've thought, whether that involves partners and kids or it doesn't, then that's up to you. I also believe that human beings were not emotionally equipped to actually spend their entire lives with just one person. And I'm not saying that it can't be done, but I just think that, for most humans, having several partners throughout your life that you learn from helps you grow and mature as a human being. That's what I've always believed human relationships should REALLY be like. Regardless, that's not to say that it's not for me, at least the whole monogamy thing. I know that kids aren't gonna be my thing. I don't like kids, I've never wanted kids and, if I had one, I'd probably be a shitty dad. Not because I'm purposely shitty or negligent, just because I wouldn't know what to do. I suppose that's neither here nor there nor is it the reason that I'm writing this review. I just thought I'd give my two cents on this whole parenting and monogamy thing before moving on. I guess that, in a lot of ways, there's a lot that is familiar to someone that has seen more than five independent dramedies throughout the years. And I think that's why I'm feeling particularly conflicted about this movie. In many ways, it's kind of a lovely exploration of two thirtysomethings struggling with adjusting to the fact that their life, in about three months or so, is going to change forever with the birth of their daughter. So to help them adjust to this massive change, Burt and Verona go on this road trip to Phoenix, Madison (in Wisconsin) and Montreal. Verona's old boss and sister live in Phoenix. Burt has a cousin in Madison (and also a job interview there). And some college buddies of Burt and Verona's live in Montreal. So, in short, they're looking to live close to someone that they know as Burt's parents are moving to Belgium for two years a month prior to the birth of their grandchild. I guess that, in a lot of ways, the film is more about facing your fears head-on than anything else. Verona's parents died when she was 22 (it's never known how) and, in the years since their deaths, Verona has never really talked about them to anyone, not Burt and not even her sister. This, I feel, probably fuels Verona's uncertainty about becoming a mother for the first time. By looking outwardly, at people she knows, and wanting to move closer to them, I think she believes it's gonna be easier for her to raise this child, since she has someone she can count on. Perhaps not to raise her child, but just so that she doesn't have to do it all alone. Not that Burt isn't gonna help, naturally, but I imagine she's thinking about it in a way that, honestly, I could never really understand. Of course Burt goes through his own fears as, later on in the film, his brother's wife abandons him, leaving him with a young girl to raise and that sends Burt into a panic, believing that that might happen to them. So, honestly, I really do like this film's story. It's simple, yes, but it's definitely got compelling and intriguing characters. Yet, for some reason, there was never really anything spectacular about this movie, outside of Maya Rudolph's and John Krasinski's performances, which were great. I really do think that John and Maya felt like an actual couple because the characters were written as such and, of course, because there was great chemistry there between the two. But there's just nothing else about the movie that truly shines above its relatively unremarkable script. And I don't mean that it's a boring movie, because it's not boring in the slightest. I just mean unremarkable in the quite literal sense, there's nothing remarkable here. There's a lot of good here, yes, but nothing that makes this truly a must-see independent dramedy. Perhaps I was spoiled by Little Miss Sunshine. Not that I, of course, expected this to be that. They're different movies made by different people for, really, different audiences (even if both films fit within the same genre). The ending is definitely emotional and bittersweet, particularly for Verona as she finally faces her fears head-on, and it's definitely an earned ending. The 'sentimentality' doesn't feel forced or ham-fisted. Burt and Verona truly deserve this ending. I just think that the narrative travels a path many others have traveled without truly innovating or excelling at it. It's a good movie, don't get me wrong. Burt and Verona are strong characters and the lead actors are great together. It's just that everything else around them ISN'T great and that's where it 'falls apart'. I put this in quotation marks, because I don't want it to seem like this is a bad movie. I can't stress that enough. With that said, however, I bought this for $5 some years ago (actually bought another one along with this, A Serious Man I believe, for a combined $10) and I don't regret my purchase, but if you know me and you want me to lend it to you, then I gladly will. This isn't a movie that you spend money on, honestly. It's something that you watch, you enjoy, but it's not something that's gonna stick with you in the long-term. I'd recommend it in the case you know someone or if it's on cable TV. Good, but not outstanding.

    I don't really know why I'm even starting with this, but I just saw the new trailer for Jordan Peele's Us (he wrote and directed Get Out, one of the best horror movies I've ever seen) and, now, I'm unbelievably pumped and excited for that one. I haven't gone to movie theaters in many, many years, but that's a movie I really would consider going to the theaters for. Ah, in a perfect world. Anyway, on to this, shall we? So, yea, I've never been a big fan of kids and the idea that some people try to drill into your mind that the idea of what a great life is is settling down, getting married to your sweetheart, having kids and growing old together. I hate that concept of happiness. You make your own happiness I've thought, whether that involves partners and kids or it doesn't, then that's up to you. I also believe that human beings were not emotionally equipped to actually spend their entire lives with just one person. And I'm not saying that it can't be done, but I just think that, for most humans, having several partners throughout your life that you learn from helps you grow and mature as a human being. That's what I've always believed human relationships should REALLY be like. Regardless, that's not to say that it's not for me, at least the whole monogamy thing. I know that kids aren't gonna be my thing. I don't like kids, I've never wanted kids and, if I had one, I'd probably be a shitty dad. Not because I'm purposely shitty or negligent, just because I wouldn't know what to do. I suppose that's neither here nor there nor is it the reason that I'm writing this review. I just thought I'd give my two cents on this whole parenting and monogamy thing before moving on. I guess that, in a lot of ways, there's a lot that is familiar to someone that has seen more than five independent dramedies throughout the years. And I think that's why I'm feeling particularly conflicted about this movie. In many ways, it's kind of a lovely exploration of two thirtysomethings struggling with adjusting to the fact that their life, in about three months or so, is going to change forever with the birth of their daughter. So to help them adjust to this massive change, Burt and Verona go on this road trip to Phoenix, Madison (in Wisconsin) and Montreal. Verona's old boss and sister live in Phoenix. Burt has a cousin in Madison (and also a job interview there). And some college buddies of Burt and Verona's live in Montreal. So, in short, they're looking to live close to someone that they know as Burt's parents are moving to Belgium for two years a month prior to the birth of their grandchild. I guess that, in a lot of ways, the film is more about facing your fears head-on than anything else. Verona's parents died when she was 22 (it's never known how) and, in the years since their deaths, Verona has never really talked about them to anyone, not Burt and not even her sister. This, I feel, probably fuels Verona's uncertainty about becoming a mother for the first time. By looking outwardly, at people she knows, and wanting to move closer to them, I think she believes it's gonna be easier for her to raise this child, since she has someone she can count on. Perhaps not to raise her child, but just so that she doesn't have to do it all alone. Not that Burt isn't gonna help, naturally, but I imagine she's thinking about it in a way that, honestly, I could never really understand. Of course Burt goes through his own fears as, later on in the film, his brother's wife abandons him, leaving him with a young girl to raise and that sends Burt into a panic, believing that that might happen to them. So, honestly, I really do like this film's story. It's simple, yes, but it's definitely got compelling and intriguing characters. Yet, for some reason, there was never really anything spectacular about this movie, outside of Maya Rudolph's and John Krasinski's performances, which were great. I really do think that John and Maya felt like an actual couple because the characters were written as such and, of course, because there was great chemistry there between the two. But there's just nothing else about the movie that truly shines above its relatively unremarkable script. And I don't mean that it's a boring movie, because it's not boring in the slightest. I just mean unremarkable in the quite literal sense, there's nothing remarkable here. There's a lot of good here, yes, but nothing that makes this truly a must-see independent dramedy. Perhaps I was spoiled by Little Miss Sunshine. Not that I, of course, expected this to be that. They're different movies made by different people for, really, different audiences (even if both films fit within the same genre). The ending is definitely emotional and bittersweet, particularly for Verona as she finally faces her fears head-on, and it's definitely an earned ending. The 'sentimentality' doesn't feel forced or ham-fisted. Burt and Verona truly deserve this ending. I just think that the narrative travels a path many others have traveled without truly innovating or excelling at it. It's a good movie, don't get me wrong. Burt and Verona are strong characters and the lead actors are great together. It's just that everything else around them ISN'T great and that's where it 'falls apart'. I put this in quotation marks, because I don't want it to seem like this is a bad movie. I can't stress that enough. With that said, however, I bought this for $5 some years ago (actually bought another one along with this, A Serious Man I believe, for a combined $10) and I don't regret my purchase, but if you know me and you want me to lend it to you, then I gladly will. This isn't a movie that you spend money on, honestly. It's something that you watch, you enjoy, but it's not something that's gonna stick with you in the long-term. I'd recommend it in the case you know someone or if it's on cable TV. Good, but not outstanding.