Band of Outsiders (Bande à part) Reviews

  • Nov 06, 2018

    This film was great!

    This film was great!

  • Oct 16, 2018

    Band of Outsiders is the story of a pair of men who plan to steal some money with the assistance of a young woman who is living with the target. The plan is rudimentary to say the least, so don’t get the impression that this is some kind of heist film. They do spend a decent amount of time talking about the crime, including when it needs to happen and how they will pull it off, but there are no complex steps that will be necessary. The movie is a bit slow-moving because it takes time to get to the actual day of the robbery, and it feels like the kind of crime that could be done on a whim. Yet for some reason it never felt like the movie was dragging and I was not bored by it. What made the time pass so easily is the fact that they used all this build-up to establish the characters and the relationships between them. We get a lot of time with Anna Karina and start to sympathize as she is manipulated by these men who want to use her to pull off this robbery. We also have plenty of time to learn the differences in personalities between Claude Brasseur and Sami Frey, and we start to question if either of them truly cares for Anna Karina. I quite liked how they handled all the relationship scenes and allowed us to deduce some of the underlying emotions without feeling the need to spell them out. It’s a subtle movie that has a number of scenes that feel like they could have been in a silent film. At times Band of Outsiders has a heightened almost surreal tone, which I loved. This was most evident in the scene where the three main characters get up and do an entire choreographed dance in the middle of a diner. It was so playful and fun that it made me smile the entire time. It didn’t tonally match everything else in the movie, but I did not care because I was enjoying the sequence so much. I do wonder if that scene shifted my opinion of the whole film, though, because it made the darker elements of the story feel harsh and out of place. There were definitely some aspects that I found entertaining in Band of Outsiders, even if it wasn’t a total success for me. It had just enough high points that I would like to watch it again knowing what to expect.

    Band of Outsiders is the story of a pair of men who plan to steal some money with the assistance of a young woman who is living with the target. The plan is rudimentary to say the least, so don’t get the impression that this is some kind of heist film. They do spend a decent amount of time talking about the crime, including when it needs to happen and how they will pull it off, but there are no complex steps that will be necessary. The movie is a bit slow-moving because it takes time to get to the actual day of the robbery, and it feels like the kind of crime that could be done on a whim. Yet for some reason it never felt like the movie was dragging and I was not bored by it. What made the time pass so easily is the fact that they used all this build-up to establish the characters and the relationships between them. We get a lot of time with Anna Karina and start to sympathize as she is manipulated by these men who want to use her to pull off this robbery. We also have plenty of time to learn the differences in personalities between Claude Brasseur and Sami Frey, and we start to question if either of them truly cares for Anna Karina. I quite liked how they handled all the relationship scenes and allowed us to deduce some of the underlying emotions without feeling the need to spell them out. It’s a subtle movie that has a number of scenes that feel like they could have been in a silent film. At times Band of Outsiders has a heightened almost surreal tone, which I loved. This was most evident in the scene where the three main characters get up and do an entire choreographed dance in the middle of a diner. It was so playful and fun that it made me smile the entire time. It didn’t tonally match everything else in the movie, but I did not care because I was enjoying the sequence so much. I do wonder if that scene shifted my opinion of the whole film, though, because it made the darker elements of the story feel harsh and out of place. There were definitely some aspects that I found entertaining in Band of Outsiders, even if it wasn’t a total success for me. It had just enough high points that I would like to watch it again knowing what to expect.

  • Aug 09, 2017

    "I didn't know if dream was becoming reality or, reality becoming a dream" perfectly represents the self-conscious philosophy of Les Nouvelles Vagues. Modern movies continue to take notes on Jean Luc Godard's work which revels in the art of cinema. Delightful and thought-provoking, "Bande a Part" executes the simple home-invasion movie with distinct style and freshness which still holds up to this day. Perhaps the most iconic scene occurs at the midpoint of the film in which the characters joyfully dance the "Madison". A scene which has strong resemblance to that of Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction". In fact, the writer-director famously named his production company "A Band Apart" as homage to the film. Immediately introducing the voice-over of the character Franz, the audience are made aware that they are watching a movie, epitomising the Auteur theory which began during Les Nouvelles Vagues. Like other Godard films, "Bande a Part" is a film which I will continue to recommend to anyone interested in movies. Simply put, it's one of the best films ever made.

    "I didn't know if dream was becoming reality or, reality becoming a dream" perfectly represents the self-conscious philosophy of Les Nouvelles Vagues. Modern movies continue to take notes on Jean Luc Godard's work which revels in the art of cinema. Delightful and thought-provoking, "Bande a Part" executes the simple home-invasion movie with distinct style and freshness which still holds up to this day. Perhaps the most iconic scene occurs at the midpoint of the film in which the characters joyfully dance the "Madison". A scene which has strong resemblance to that of Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction". In fact, the writer-director famously named his production company "A Band Apart" as homage to the film. Immediately introducing the voice-over of the character Franz, the audience are made aware that they are watching a movie, epitomising the Auteur theory which began during Les Nouvelles Vagues. Like other Godard films, "Bande a Part" is a film which I will continue to recommend to anyone interested in movies. Simply put, it's one of the best films ever made.

  • Jul 25, 2017

    Band of Outsiders is a cool, funny and dark film about three listless youths committing a half-assed robbery. The line dance scene alone is worth the price of watching it on YouTube.

    Band of Outsiders is a cool, funny and dark film about three listless youths committing a half-assed robbery. The line dance scene alone is worth the price of watching it on YouTube.

  • Mar 24, 2017

    Right off the bat Anna Karina. Wooh! What a cute little thang she is. I definitely enjoyed watching her wok her charm throughout the movie. This movie doesn't take itself seriously which is a breath of fresh air from what French cinema usually is. It's funny at times and it definitely has a charm about it. This movie takes a different approach to your usual heist movie. Godard definitely has his own style and it's very distinctive. Overall, this movie was fun to watch and was great to see a new twist on the heist genre.

    Right off the bat Anna Karina. Wooh! What a cute little thang she is. I definitely enjoyed watching her wok her charm throughout the movie. This movie doesn't take itself seriously which is a breath of fresh air from what French cinema usually is. It's funny at times and it definitely has a charm about it. This movie takes a different approach to your usual heist movie. Godard definitely has his own style and it's very distinctive. Overall, this movie was fun to watch and was great to see a new twist on the heist genre.

  • Jan 20, 2017

    The film left the world with some cinematic heritage, Jean-Luc Godard is however never my thingy.

    The film left the world with some cinematic heritage, Jean-Luc Godard is however never my thingy.

  • Dec 27, 2016

    Band of Outsiders is a compelling tale about love and crime that benefits from writer/director Jean-Luc Godard's mastery of filmmaking.

    Band of Outsiders is a compelling tale about love and crime that benefits from writer/director Jean-Luc Godard's mastery of filmmaking.

  • Dec 02, 2016

    Odile (Anna Karina) meets a man named Franz (Sami Frey) in an English language class. She has told him of a large pile of money stashed in the villa where she lives with her aunt, Madame Victoria and a man named Monsieur Stoltz in Joinville, a Parisian suburb. Franz tells his friend Arthur (Claude Brasseur) of the money - and his nascent romance with Odile - and the two hatch a plan to steal it. Meanwhile, Franz and Arthur try to seduce Odile. Ultimately, Arthur wins Odile, and they spend the night together. Arthur's uncle learns of their plot and wants a cut of the money. Franz, Arthur, and Odile now must commit the robbery the night before they had planned, the night they knew M. Stoltz would be away from home. Moreover, M. Stoltz grows suspicious, and he hides the money and changes the locks. Will they pull off the heist? "Bande à part" is a 1964 Nouvelle vague film directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It was released as Band of Outsiders in North America; its French title derives from the phrase faire bande à part, which means "to do something apart from the group." The film is an adaptation of the novel Fools' Gold (Doubleday Crime Club, 1958) by American author Dolores Hitchens (1907-1973). The film belongs to the French New Wave movement. Godard described it as "Alice in Wonderland meets Franz Kafka". "Bande à part" is often considered one of Godard's most accessible films; Amy Taubin of the Village Voice called it "a Godard film for people who don't much care for Godard". Its accessibility has endeared the film to a broader audience. For example, it was the only Godard film selected for Time's All-TIME 100 movies. Film critic Pauline Kael described "Bande à part" as "a reverie of a gangster movie" and "perhaps Godard's most delicately charming film". The entire coffeehouse dance scene was also used as the music video for the song "Dance with Me", by the music group Nouvelle Vague from their 2006 album Bande à Part. The group took their name from a scene in the movie, where Odile and Arthur are walking on a street and pass a business with Nouvelle Vague (New Wave or New Trend) in large letters over the door. Bande à part was ranked No. 79 in Empire magazine's "The 100 Best Films of World Cinema" in 2010. "Bande à part" has been in my DVD shelf for a long time and finally I pulled it out and saw it. This New Wave film has a touch of a beatnik tale with a jazzy and anarchistic look upon life. Within the french New Wave cinema movement the filmmakers were linked by: their self-conscious rejection of the literary period pieces being made in France and written by novelists; their spirit of youthful iconoclasm; the desire to shoot more current social issues on location; and their intention of experimenting with the film form. Many also engaged in their work with the social and political upheavals of the era, making their radical experiments with editing, visual style and narrative part of a general break with the conservative paradigm. Using portable equipment and requiring little or no set up time, the New Wave way of filmmaking presented a documentary style. The films exhibited direct sounds on film stock that required less light. Filming techniques included fragmented, discontinuous editing, and long takes. The combination of objective realism, subjective realism, and authorial commentary created a narrative ambiguity in the sense that questions that arise in a film are not answered in the end. "Bande à part" is free in it´s form, has a touch of realism in it´s cinematography and you are not quite sure where the story is going as it is fragmented, despite the fact that you know the main plot. At times it´s an intriguing film, but at the same time it suffers from the art house cinema complex. The acting is theatrical and so is the dialogue, the need to tell the tale in chopped up order and characters that seems to be more charitures than "real" people. I do love Godard´s move of including scenes like the dance sequence and when the three anti heroes attempt to break the world record for running through the Louvre museum. However, there´s something banal and too experimental with "Band a Parte" that doesn´t quite make it for me. I wanted to like it more than I did.

    Odile (Anna Karina) meets a man named Franz (Sami Frey) in an English language class. She has told him of a large pile of money stashed in the villa where she lives with her aunt, Madame Victoria and a man named Monsieur Stoltz in Joinville, a Parisian suburb. Franz tells his friend Arthur (Claude Brasseur) of the money - and his nascent romance with Odile - and the two hatch a plan to steal it. Meanwhile, Franz and Arthur try to seduce Odile. Ultimately, Arthur wins Odile, and they spend the night together. Arthur's uncle learns of their plot and wants a cut of the money. Franz, Arthur, and Odile now must commit the robbery the night before they had planned, the night they knew M. Stoltz would be away from home. Moreover, M. Stoltz grows suspicious, and he hides the money and changes the locks. Will they pull off the heist? "Bande à part" is a 1964 Nouvelle vague film directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It was released as Band of Outsiders in North America; its French title derives from the phrase faire bande à part, which means "to do something apart from the group." The film is an adaptation of the novel Fools' Gold (Doubleday Crime Club, 1958) by American author Dolores Hitchens (1907-1973). The film belongs to the French New Wave movement. Godard described it as "Alice in Wonderland meets Franz Kafka". "Bande à part" is often considered one of Godard's most accessible films; Amy Taubin of the Village Voice called it "a Godard film for people who don't much care for Godard". Its accessibility has endeared the film to a broader audience. For example, it was the only Godard film selected for Time's All-TIME 100 movies. Film critic Pauline Kael described "Bande à part" as "a reverie of a gangster movie" and "perhaps Godard's most delicately charming film". The entire coffeehouse dance scene was also used as the music video for the song "Dance with Me", by the music group Nouvelle Vague from their 2006 album Bande à Part. The group took their name from a scene in the movie, where Odile and Arthur are walking on a street and pass a business with Nouvelle Vague (New Wave or New Trend) in large letters over the door. Bande à part was ranked No. 79 in Empire magazine's "The 100 Best Films of World Cinema" in 2010. "Bande à part" has been in my DVD shelf for a long time and finally I pulled it out and saw it. This New Wave film has a touch of a beatnik tale with a jazzy and anarchistic look upon life. Within the french New Wave cinema movement the filmmakers were linked by: their self-conscious rejection of the literary period pieces being made in France and written by novelists; their spirit of youthful iconoclasm; the desire to shoot more current social issues on location; and their intention of experimenting with the film form. Many also engaged in their work with the social and political upheavals of the era, making their radical experiments with editing, visual style and narrative part of a general break with the conservative paradigm. Using portable equipment and requiring little or no set up time, the New Wave way of filmmaking presented a documentary style. The films exhibited direct sounds on film stock that required less light. Filming techniques included fragmented, discontinuous editing, and long takes. The combination of objective realism, subjective realism, and authorial commentary created a narrative ambiguity in the sense that questions that arise in a film are not answered in the end. "Bande à part" is free in it´s form, has a touch of realism in it´s cinematography and you are not quite sure where the story is going as it is fragmented, despite the fact that you know the main plot. At times it´s an intriguing film, but at the same time it suffers from the art house cinema complex. The acting is theatrical and so is the dialogue, the need to tell the tale in chopped up order and characters that seems to be more charitures than "real" people. I do love Godard´s move of including scenes like the dance sequence and when the three anti heroes attempt to break the world record for running through the Louvre museum. However, there´s something banal and too experimental with "Band a Parte" that doesn´t quite make it for me. I wanted to like it more than I did.

  • May 23, 2016

    It feels like guerilla film making, probably because it was. Uber naturalistic and surprisingly depressing.

    It feels like guerilla film making, probably because it was. Uber naturalistic and surprisingly depressing.

  • Mar 13, 2016

    This classic French New Wave film from Jean-Luc Godard is one of his more accessible films. it's really energetic and a lot of fun, especially the dance sequence. The camera definitely loves Anna Karina. This is a must watch for all serious film fans, Tarantino named his Production company after it.

    This classic French New Wave film from Jean-Luc Godard is one of his more accessible films. it's really energetic and a lot of fun, especially the dance sequence. The camera definitely loves Anna Karina. This is a must watch for all serious film fans, Tarantino named his Production company after it.