Baraka Reviews

  • Oct 08, 2018

    This film, is tremendously boring because the scenery not a appealing.

    This film, is tremendously boring because the scenery not a appealing.

  • May 30, 2018

    BARAKA- 90% The most beautiful visuals and camera work ever witnessed in my life. This documentary carries a different kind of structure than most. There is no dialogue and just visuals. There is some form of structure in the story, however, it is not very evident. It is also not for everyone t spend two hours looking at visuals without a story structure or dialogue. I will grade it a bit differently due to its exception: Story-wise and execution: 3/5 Camera work: 2/1.5 Sound: 2/1.5 Cast: 2/2 Overall Score: 4.5/5

    BARAKA- 90% The most beautiful visuals and camera work ever witnessed in my life. This documentary carries a different kind of structure than most. There is no dialogue and just visuals. There is some form of structure in the story, however, it is not very evident. It is also not for everyone t spend two hours looking at visuals without a story structure or dialogue. I will grade it a bit differently due to its exception: Story-wise and execution: 3/5 Camera work: 2/1.5 Sound: 2/1.5 Cast: 2/2 Overall Score: 4.5/5

  • Jan 30, 2018

    Amazing! This beautiful movie changed the way I look at humanity. Plus one amazing soundtrack. Absolutely recommend.

    Amazing! This beautiful movie changed the way I look at humanity. Plus one amazing soundtrack. Absolutely recommend.

  • Jan 08, 2017

    A visual feast that conveys the evolution of the world over a series of speechless, video collages. The film is beautiful experience. It spawned a number of knock-offs and a sequel by the same filmmakers, Samsara (2011). I couldn't help thinking that The Tree Of Life (2011) ripped off elements from Baraka. However, I have not found another voiceless film that compares to this original masterpiece.

    A visual feast that conveys the evolution of the world over a series of speechless, video collages. The film is beautiful experience. It spawned a number of knock-offs and a sequel by the same filmmakers, Samsara (2011). I couldn't help thinking that The Tree Of Life (2011) ripped off elements from Baraka. However, I have not found another voiceless film that compares to this original masterpiece.

  • Aug 20, 2016

    I watched it in open air movie show by Scarborough Film Festival. Amazing Experience.

    I watched it in open air movie show by Scarborough Film Festival. Amazing Experience.

  • Jul 30, 2016

    The world, the nature, the people, mankind, spirits, winds, motion, changes, evolution, ancient, new, old. All shown in a spiritual beautiful way, giving a tremendous broadened vision of life here on earth. Simply magnificent.

    The world, the nature, the people, mankind, spirits, winds, motion, changes, evolution, ancient, new, old. All shown in a spiritual beautiful way, giving a tremendous broadened vision of life here on earth. Simply magnificent.

  • May 06, 2016

    Visually stunning but not as powerful or coherent as Samsara. A documentary on...everything. No narration, no annotations or sub-titles, just images. We see majestic mountains, wildlife, religious and cultural ceremonies and customs, geological phenomena, landscapes, human habitation and how this impacts on nature, industry, urban living, poverty, military weapons and the effects of war, monuments to atrocities, art and architecture. The images are taken from all over the planet. While they might seem random at first, there are links between the different scenes... Quite amazing, visually: well selected and filmed images. It's like a National Geographic video without narration. Interesting themes too: nature vs mankind, war and its effects, the extent of human cruelty, the extent of human creativity, the superficiality and dullness of our daily lives. However, I found the individual scenes a bit ponderous at times, as if the director lingered on one subject too long to take up time. Also, the themes weren't always that clear, profound or well thought out. The problem might be that I watched Samsara (also directed by Ron Fricke and released a year after Baraka) before Baraka, thus some of the novelty had worn off. Samsara seemed more coherent in its message and had better pacing. Maybe if I had watched them in reverse order, my feelings on the two would be reversed. Overall, well worth watching. A very original documentary.

    Visually stunning but not as powerful or coherent as Samsara. A documentary on...everything. No narration, no annotations or sub-titles, just images. We see majestic mountains, wildlife, religious and cultural ceremonies and customs, geological phenomena, landscapes, human habitation and how this impacts on nature, industry, urban living, poverty, military weapons and the effects of war, monuments to atrocities, art and architecture. The images are taken from all over the planet. While they might seem random at first, there are links between the different scenes... Quite amazing, visually: well selected and filmed images. It's like a National Geographic video without narration. Interesting themes too: nature vs mankind, war and its effects, the extent of human cruelty, the extent of human creativity, the superficiality and dullness of our daily lives. However, I found the individual scenes a bit ponderous at times, as if the director lingered on one subject too long to take up time. Also, the themes weren't always that clear, profound or well thought out. The problem might be that I watched Samsara (also directed by Ron Fricke and released a year after Baraka) before Baraka, thus some of the novelty had worn off. Samsara seemed more coherent in its message and had better pacing. Maybe if I had watched them in reverse order, my feelings on the two would be reversed. Overall, well worth watching. A very original documentary.

  • Apr 23, 2016

    Quite a good example of the kind.

    Quite a good example of the kind.

  • Jan 24, 2016

    Ron Fricke was the cinematographer for the classic photography film, Koyaanisqatsi (1982), directed by Godfrey Reggio. That earlier film had no plot but the theme of a "world out of balance" was clear and the music by Philip Glass was memorable and now immediately recognizable. Although Reggio followed up with two additional qatsi films, Fricke was not involved. Baraka was Fricke's own "sequel" to the earlier work, although Baraka's theme (or themes) is much less obvious. Instead, this film (and the subsequent Samsara from 2011) is all about the images - and they are gorgeous, especially in this remastered blu-ray version. However, without a clear indication of where each sequence was shot - and the images come from 24 different countries on 6 continents - viewers are left to speculate. Therefore, we simply talked aloud to the movie (and each other) about the locations and the possible connections between sequences (cutting from a battery hen farm to Japanese commuters squashed into a train makes some kind of statement, I guess). The music is a bit less compelling than that of Philip Glass but occasionally rises to the occasion. All told, Baraka gives you a chance to be fully amazed by the wonders of this world and the varied people in it - circa the early nineties. As such, we sometimes reflected upon whether all these wondrous things are still with us twenty-something years later.

    Ron Fricke was the cinematographer for the classic photography film, Koyaanisqatsi (1982), directed by Godfrey Reggio. That earlier film had no plot but the theme of a "world out of balance" was clear and the music by Philip Glass was memorable and now immediately recognizable. Although Reggio followed up with two additional qatsi films, Fricke was not involved. Baraka was Fricke's own "sequel" to the earlier work, although Baraka's theme (or themes) is much less obvious. Instead, this film (and the subsequent Samsara from 2011) is all about the images - and they are gorgeous, especially in this remastered blu-ray version. However, without a clear indication of where each sequence was shot - and the images come from 24 different countries on 6 continents - viewers are left to speculate. Therefore, we simply talked aloud to the movie (and each other) about the locations and the possible connections between sequences (cutting from a battery hen farm to Japanese commuters squashed into a train makes some kind of statement, I guess). The music is a bit less compelling than that of Philip Glass but occasionally rises to the occasion. All told, Baraka gives you a chance to be fully amazed by the wonders of this world and the varied people in it - circa the early nineties. As such, we sometimes reflected upon whether all these wondrous things are still with us twenty-something years later.

  • May 29, 2015

    Postcards of this world... Both modern and old. The great, the not so great, the bad and the ironic. Must watch.

    Postcards of this world... Both modern and old. The great, the not so great, the bad and the ironic. Must watch.