Beat the Devil Reviews

  • Nov 05, 2020

    Good story that never reaches the suspenseful climax you expect. Great cast although Jones steals the spotlight.

    Good story that never reaches the suspenseful climax you expect. Great cast although Jones steals the spotlight.

  • Sep 10, 2020

    What is the point of it all? I just see a too mediocre film.

    What is the point of it all? I just see a too mediocre film.

  • Jul 06, 2020

    This quirky film, co-written by Huston and Truman Capote, is one of my top ten favourite films. It boasts a talented, all-star cast, each of whom is given memorable lines and scenes. You either "get it" or you don't. I am happy to be among those that get it!

    This quirky film, co-written by Huston and Truman Capote, is one of my top ten favourite films. It boasts a talented, all-star cast, each of whom is given memorable lines and scenes. You either "get it" or you don't. I am happy to be among those that get it!

  • May 20, 2020

    Unwatchable. A complete mess. So unbelievably bad it's amazing it has ANY positive votes at all. Bogart himself HATED it, saying "Only phonies like it." Avoid. It's time you will never get back.

    Unwatchable. A complete mess. So unbelievably bad it's amazing it has ANY positive votes at all. Bogart himself HATED it, saying "Only phonies like it." Avoid. It's time you will never get back.

  • Apr 09, 2020

    I usually love old Bogart stuff, but this one was a loser.

    I usually love old Bogart stuff, but this one was a loser.

  • Dec 30, 2019

    Definitely one of the weirdest strangest Humphrey Bogart movies I ever saw but it's so wonderful the actors are so amazing there's M from the James Bond movies Gina Lollobrigida from her first American English movie Robert Morley Peter Lorre Humphrey Bogart incredible I love this film greatest movie of all time next to Star Trek the motion picture

    Definitely one of the weirdest strangest Humphrey Bogart movies I ever saw but it's so wonderful the actors are so amazing there's M from the James Bond movies Gina Lollobrigida from her first American English movie Robert Morley Peter Lorre Humphrey Bogart incredible I love this film greatest movie of all time next to Star Trek the motion picture

  • Mar 16, 2019

    It takes a while to get into this knockabout comedy thriller, but the all star cast and stunning setting certainly helps. It's actually beautifully scripted and a joy from start to finish. For fans of Arsenic and Old Lace.

    It takes a while to get into this knockabout comedy thriller, but the all star cast and stunning setting certainly helps. It's actually beautifully scripted and a joy from start to finish. For fans of Arsenic and Old Lace.

  • Feb 24, 2019

    Near the end of John Huston's "The Maltese Falcon" Sydney Greenstreet's Mr. Gutman and his motley crew of desperate criminals invite Bogart's Sam Spade to Istanbul in order to continue the quixotic quest for the Golden Falcon. Spade declines the offer, however; in John Huston's "Beat the Devil" we have a riff on what might have happened had Sam Spade accepted the offer and went along with Gutman's vain quest for the Falcon. In essence, "Beat the Devil" is a spiritual sequel to the Maltese Falcon as well as an experiment in style in depicting how the tragic quality of noir eventually leads into the territory of screwball farce if the anti-hero of Film Noir were to continue striving for the unattainable after being confronted with the truth of the matter. This is where we begin in "Beat the Devil" as a listless Bogart is stuck in a purgatorial port of call waiting to mediate a get rich uranium grab for the bumbling group of crooks we left in San Francisco from "The Maltese Falcon." Along comes Jennifer Jones, a playful inversion of the Femme Fatale, with her snobby English husband, both of whom turn the scheme upside down and into a comedy of manners and infidelity. The film plays out as both a parody of Film Noir and a satire of colonial politics. Particularly, under fire is the world's unhealthy obsession with American pop culture. A scene in which an imprisoned Bogart promises to introduce an Arab official to Rita Hayworth in exchange for his freedom is one of the best of the film. "Beat the Devil" is ahead of time and reminds one of the Noir revisionist films that were to come such as Altman's "The Long Kiss Goodbye" and Godard's "Breathless." There is a slapdash quality to the direction and cinematography that is to the film's credit and resembles the later films of Orson Welles. In its peculiar way, "Beat the Devil" is a minor masterpiece and this being mainly due to the playful way in which John Huston turns a style he created and pioneered into clever parody and political satire, which is a rare feat for the even the most self reflexive of directors.

    Near the end of John Huston's "The Maltese Falcon" Sydney Greenstreet's Mr. Gutman and his motley crew of desperate criminals invite Bogart's Sam Spade to Istanbul in order to continue the quixotic quest for the Golden Falcon. Spade declines the offer, however; in John Huston's "Beat the Devil" we have a riff on what might have happened had Sam Spade accepted the offer and went along with Gutman's vain quest for the Falcon. In essence, "Beat the Devil" is a spiritual sequel to the Maltese Falcon as well as an experiment in style in depicting how the tragic quality of noir eventually leads into the territory of screwball farce if the anti-hero of Film Noir were to continue striving for the unattainable after being confronted with the truth of the matter. This is where we begin in "Beat the Devil" as a listless Bogart is stuck in a purgatorial port of call waiting to mediate a get rich uranium grab for the bumbling group of crooks we left in San Francisco from "The Maltese Falcon." Along comes Jennifer Jones, a playful inversion of the Femme Fatale, with her snobby English husband, both of whom turn the scheme upside down and into a comedy of manners and infidelity. The film plays out as both a parody of Film Noir and a satire of colonial politics. Particularly, under fire is the world's unhealthy obsession with American pop culture. A scene in which an imprisoned Bogart promises to introduce an Arab official to Rita Hayworth in exchange for his freedom is one of the best of the film. "Beat the Devil" is ahead of time and reminds one of the Noir revisionist films that were to come such as Altman's "The Long Kiss Goodbye" and Godard's "Breathless." There is a slapdash quality to the direction and cinematography that is to the film's credit and resembles the later films of Orson Welles. In its peculiar way, "Beat the Devil" is a minor masterpiece and this being mainly due to the playful way in which John Huston turns a style he created and pioneered into clever parody and political satire, which is a rare feat for the even the most self reflexive of directors.

  • Jan 27, 2019

    The best comedy movie ever made!

    The best comedy movie ever made!

  • Mar 10, 2018

    This is an odd movie, a thinking-man's version of a screwball comedy, with a big flaw: it took a lot of time at the beginning of the film for the director's intentions to shine through. After that, it got much better. Despite the many changes in location, I had the impression that the performers would have preferred a stage play where they could let loose with their verbal jousting. In fact the best passages were the ensemble scenes in close surroundings. Jennifer Jones was the OUTSTANDING member of a great ensemble.

    This is an odd movie, a thinking-man's version of a screwball comedy, with a big flaw: it took a lot of time at the beginning of the film for the director's intentions to shine through. After that, it got much better. Despite the many changes in location, I had the impression that the performers would have preferred a stage play where they could let loose with their verbal jousting. In fact the best passages were the ensemble scenes in close surroundings. Jennifer Jones was the OUTSTANDING member of a great ensemble.