Belle Reviews

  • Oct 11, 2020

    This movie dragged for most of its length. The characters are very flat, as is the acting by the lead.

    This movie dragged for most of its length. The characters are very flat, as is the acting by the lead.

  • Aug 25, 2020

    first movie to make me cry since notebook

    first movie to make me cry since notebook

  • Jul 01, 2020

    This is a must-see. One of the reasons why I love films is that they show us important stories that must be heard, like this one for example. The sceneries are very beautiful too

    This is a must-see. One of the reasons why I love films is that they show us important stories that must be heard, like this one for example. The sceneries are very beautiful too

  • Jan 03, 2020

    One of my favorite movies!! I love Belle!! and John's expression of love for Dido is not my standard

    One of my favorite movies!! I love Belle!! and John's expression of love for Dido is not my standard

  • Nov 18, 2019

    Although the movie had excellent acting, what stopped me from giving the film a higher rating was the fact that Belle, or Dido as she is referred in the film, had no such a role in the real life events that played out in the film. This is supposedly a work of historical fiction and not of alternate history, and so when making a historical fiction piece, the main plot shouldn't be based around a nearly fictitious character. This makes the film feel unreal and fake as if it were just a standard piece of fiction. As a standard fictional film, I'd say that it was okay and it had some nice moments, but as a historical fiction or more accurately alternate history, this film falls short and could be a lot more creative.

    Although the movie had excellent acting, what stopped me from giving the film a higher rating was the fact that Belle, or Dido as she is referred in the film, had no such a role in the real life events that played out in the film. This is supposedly a work of historical fiction and not of alternate history, and so when making a historical fiction piece, the main plot shouldn't be based around a nearly fictitious character. This makes the film feel unreal and fake as if it were just a standard piece of fiction. As a standard fictional film, I'd say that it was okay and it had some nice moments, but as a historical fiction or more accurately alternate history, this film falls short and could be a lot more creative.

  • Sep 27, 2019

    "Belle" is brilliantly well-written and well-acted yet stiff with its theme. However, Asante herself took this drama period in a conventional way and to a different level. It takes the whole thing to say like this is a movie about a person. The set perfectly crafted, the gesture, the accent, the performance, everything in this movie is bearable. Not tightly bound by its execution but still tells what this movie is.

    "Belle" is brilliantly well-written and well-acted yet stiff with its theme. However, Asante herself took this drama period in a conventional way and to a different level. It takes the whole thing to say like this is a movie about a person. The set perfectly crafted, the gesture, the accent, the performance, everything in this movie is bearable. Not tightly bound by its execution but still tells what this movie is.

  • Sep 09, 2019

    Lead actress was very pretty and pouty but her 'acting' was outshone by the rest of the cast. Definitely not a nuanced performance. The film plot is is pure fiction. While Dido did exist would have made a great film subject, this account is pure tosh. It is a very pretty and engaging historical romance in lovely setting with a great complex performance by Tom Wilkinson. which raises the film's anti slavery sub plot and predictable script to another level. Just don't go in expecting actual history and lower your expectations of the acting chops of the female lead Gugu Mbatha-Raw, which are mightily overblown in most reviews, and you will enjoy it.

    Lead actress was very pretty and pouty but her 'acting' was outshone by the rest of the cast. Definitely not a nuanced performance. The film plot is is pure fiction. While Dido did exist would have made a great film subject, this account is pure tosh. It is a very pretty and engaging historical romance in lovely setting with a great complex performance by Tom Wilkinson. which raises the film's anti slavery sub plot and predictable script to another level. Just don't go in expecting actual history and lower your expectations of the acting chops of the female lead Gugu Mbatha-Raw, which are mightily overblown in most reviews, and you will enjoy it.

  • Sep 13, 2018

    Love this movie!!! Fabulous combination of civil rights, justice and a love story. I highly recommend it to all.

    Love this movie!!! Fabulous combination of civil rights, justice and a love story. I highly recommend it to all.

  • Aug 03, 2018

    - Belle's true story is bold in a perilous time - Belle's story could not be told in a more difficult or perilous era. England's empire is at its height in the 18th century. Its grandeur is largely bloodstained as the slave trade flourishes under its domain. Belle (later known as Dido, played by Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Free State of Jones) is the daughter of one such slave, but with one notable difference--her father is a captain in the king's navy. As the film opens, Captain Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode, The Imitation Game) enters the slums to find his daughter and bring her to the home of his uncle, Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson, Selma). It's a rare bid to ensure her safekeeping, education, and the upbringing that she is entitled to as one of his bloodline. Now, I really have to commend the writers here for their mad juggling skills. It's a complicated social situation in many aspects, and so far removed from our contemporary experience of life. But as Dido comes of age, we see that she faces two dangers: her difficult status as a woman of color in aristocratic society, and her position as a woman in general. Since women were considered property, it seems as if Dido escaped one form of ownership only to be sent to another. There's one scene of Dido staring at her reflection in the mirror for several moments before she begins to beat and claw at the beautiful, dark skin that signals to society that the rules must be different for her. I cried, people. Director Amma Asante, in an interview with Dame Magazine, explains: "As a black woman, I wanted to tell a very Jane Austen-esque story. I'm a lover of Jane Austen, I came to her late in life, but in some ways I'm glad that I did because it meant that I came to her with a better understanding of what she does, and how she used wit and her storytelling to really present quite a feminist stance. But, you know, how could I, as a woman of color, tell this story of genteel English life and not acknowledge the fact that what was holding up the economy of that life, of that world, of that culture, came off of the back of the slave trade? So I think that's the lens that a black female comes to it with-you have that responsibility, you have to tell both stories." And she does-remarkably so. Dido's search for belonging and her desire to carve out a place in the world that she can be bold with and proud of is something that we all can relate to. Racial tensions are still inexplicably present, and everyone seems to be struggling to find something to identify as, some tribe to join. But Dido simply wanted to be. On another note, I really must gush about the costumes. The inspiration for this film came from a portrait of Dido with her cousin, and this inspiration is evident in the stunning way that the entire film resembles a painting. It isn't just the cinematography (which is brilliant, by the way), it's the intricacies of each gown, the way their colors perfectly complement the wearers and coordinate with the other costumes and environment of the scenes. I know that I wouldn't want to wear those gowns every day, but it's easy to forget when I hear the way they swish in the background. But I digress. Belle is a film that, for all its complexity, manages to span the distance of several centuries and still truthfully display the human experience. Dido's story was as remarkable and inspiring then as it is now. It makes me wonder, if Dido didn't live in the box society placed her in, why should we? ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://www.narrativemuse.co/movies/belle, and was written Micah Orsetti. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

    - Belle's true story is bold in a perilous time - Belle's story could not be told in a more difficult or perilous era. England's empire is at its height in the 18th century. Its grandeur is largely bloodstained as the slave trade flourishes under its domain. Belle (later known as Dido, played by Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Free State of Jones) is the daughter of one such slave, but with one notable difference--her father is a captain in the king's navy. As the film opens, Captain Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode, The Imitation Game) enters the slums to find his daughter and bring her to the home of his uncle, Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson, Selma). It's a rare bid to ensure her safekeeping, education, and the upbringing that she is entitled to as one of his bloodline. Now, I really have to commend the writers here for their mad juggling skills. It's a complicated social situation in many aspects, and so far removed from our contemporary experience of life. But as Dido comes of age, we see that she faces two dangers: her difficult status as a woman of color in aristocratic society, and her position as a woman in general. Since women were considered property, it seems as if Dido escaped one form of ownership only to be sent to another. There's one scene of Dido staring at her reflection in the mirror for several moments before she begins to beat and claw at the beautiful, dark skin that signals to society that the rules must be different for her. I cried, people. Director Amma Asante, in an interview with Dame Magazine, explains: "As a black woman, I wanted to tell a very Jane Austen-esque story. I'm a lover of Jane Austen, I came to her late in life, but in some ways I'm glad that I did because it meant that I came to her with a better understanding of what she does, and how she used wit and her storytelling to really present quite a feminist stance. But, you know, how could I, as a woman of color, tell this story of genteel English life and not acknowledge the fact that what was holding up the economy of that life, of that world, of that culture, came off of the back of the slave trade? So I think that's the lens that a black female comes to it with-you have that responsibility, you have to tell both stories." And she does-remarkably so. Dido's search for belonging and her desire to carve out a place in the world that she can be bold with and proud of is something that we all can relate to. Racial tensions are still inexplicably present, and everyone seems to be struggling to find something to identify as, some tribe to join. But Dido simply wanted to be. On another note, I really must gush about the costumes. The inspiration for this film came from a portrait of Dido with her cousin, and this inspiration is evident in the stunning way that the entire film resembles a painting. It isn't just the cinematography (which is brilliant, by the way), it's the intricacies of each gown, the way their colors perfectly complement the wearers and coordinate with the other costumes and environment of the scenes. I know that I wouldn't want to wear those gowns every day, but it's easy to forget when I hear the way they swish in the background. But I digress. Belle is a film that, for all its complexity, manages to span the distance of several centuries and still truthfully display the human experience. Dido's story was as remarkable and inspiring then as it is now. It makes me wonder, if Dido didn't live in the box society placed her in, why should we? ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://www.narrativemuse.co/movies/belle, and was written Micah Orsetti. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

  • Aug 20, 2017

    Beautiful and inspiring movie about a case that defined the end of the slave trade in England in the late 18th century. Incredible acting, especially from the gorgeous Gugu Mbatha-Raw and the legendary Tom Wilkinson.

    Beautiful and inspiring movie about a case that defined the end of the slave trade in England in the late 18th century. Incredible acting, especially from the gorgeous Gugu Mbatha-Raw and the legendary Tom Wilkinson.