DamNation Reviews

  • Apr 30, 2017

    Interesting and very well shot doc on the controversial issue of keeping or taking out dams in the U.S. While it is mostly one-sided in its POV, I don't view that as a problem. It's a passionate plea to bring this issue into the political conversation. We've now seen some of the impacts both positive and negative from a century of dams. Great cinematography and animations. Great music. And a compelling edit that builds and builds.

    Interesting and very well shot doc on the controversial issue of keeping or taking out dams in the U.S. While it is mostly one-sided in its POV, I don't view that as a problem. It's a passionate plea to bring this issue into the political conversation. We've now seen some of the impacts both positive and negative from a century of dams. Great cinematography and animations. Great music. And a compelling edit that builds and builds.

  • Jun 05, 2016

    ITS AMAZING TO SEE OLD DAMS BEING REMOVED! ITS HIGH TIME ALL THE OLD NON-USED DAMS FINALLY SEE THEIR END! Restore the natural habitat....

    ITS AMAZING TO SEE OLD DAMS BEING REMOVED! ITS HIGH TIME ALL THE OLD NON-USED DAMS FINALLY SEE THEIR END! Restore the natural habitat....

  • Apr 12, 2016

    DamNation is a very well directed short film/documentary. I enjoyed how Ben Knight (narrator) introduced what he was going to say before he said it, if it was something that may be new to the viewer. If he was talking about a dam, he would explain a little bit about it. When it was built, why, cons etc. That is one thing I really enjoyed. Also the film was a little fas moving. and sometimes I had to go back and put the cations on to understand what they said. All in all I think this was a very well directed film, with a lot of useful information.

    DamNation is a very well directed short film/documentary. I enjoyed how Ben Knight (narrator) introduced what he was going to say before he said it, if it was something that may be new to the viewer. If he was talking about a dam, he would explain a little bit about it. When it was built, why, cons etc. That is one thing I really enjoyed. Also the film was a little fas moving. and sometimes I had to go back and put the cations on to understand what they said. All in all I think this was a very well directed film, with a lot of useful information.

  • Feb 17, 2016

    "DamNation" is a lesson in the conservationist views on the protection of rivers and wildlife. The best part of the film is its clever title. The rest of the film comes off as a one-sided argument with a sense of superiority. The arrogance of these filmmakers can be felt in every line of narration. While they make interesting points about lives that have been lost through dam malfunctions, a reduced salmon population, and the effects on the ecosystem, they ignore the fact that electricity is the commodity that allowed them to edit their documentary. A persuasive film can equally represent both sides but the lack of diversity in this documentary makes it feel like propaganda. They mention that the only reason not to destroy all of the dams at once is because it would be too expensive, but perhaps we should also consider that a balance is necessary to provide our country with enough electricity. "DamNation" is informative if you would like to learn the environmentalist opinion on the issue of dams (and if you would like to hear a guy tell a ten-minute story about painting the side of a dam), but this is not the place to turn for a representation of both sides of this argument.

    "DamNation" is a lesson in the conservationist views on the protection of rivers and wildlife. The best part of the film is its clever title. The rest of the film comes off as a one-sided argument with a sense of superiority. The arrogance of these filmmakers can be felt in every line of narration. While they make interesting points about lives that have been lost through dam malfunctions, a reduced salmon population, and the effects on the ecosystem, they ignore the fact that electricity is the commodity that allowed them to edit their documentary. A persuasive film can equally represent both sides but the lack of diversity in this documentary makes it feel like propaganda. They mention that the only reason not to destroy all of the dams at once is because it would be too expensive, but perhaps we should also consider that a balance is necessary to provide our country with enough electricity. "DamNation" is informative if you would like to learn the environmentalist opinion on the issue of dams (and if you would like to hear a guy tell a ten-minute story about painting the side of a dam), but this is not the place to turn for a representation of both sides of this argument.

  • Jan 21, 2016

    As with all good docs, fully reminds you that everything is terrible.

    As with all good docs, fully reminds you that everything is terrible.

  • Nov 14, 2015

    Interesting, but a little depressing. I really didn't have any idea on how dams affected ecosystems to this extent. And I like fish. Watched on Netflix at home, November 14, 2015.

    Interesting, but a little depressing. I really didn't have any idea on how dams affected ecosystems to this extent. And I like fish. Watched on Netflix at home, November 14, 2015.

  • Jun 17, 2015

    If you don't already identify with the West Coast/SoCal granola types, or have the issue of river conservation in common with them, this documentary is likely to irritate as much as it informs. With the predictable pretensions of indie tracks and eco-priests, and a narrative that barely considers the rebuttals to their cause, it's above all a persuasion piece. But look beneath that and you'll see a solid understanding of the problem of man's clumsy and short-sighted manipulation of the country's ecosystem. Even better, it offers a feasible path for progress, and reasonable methods on how to pursue it. In other words, look past the frivolities and accept the impact.

    If you don't already identify with the West Coast/SoCal granola types, or have the issue of river conservation in common with them, this documentary is likely to irritate as much as it informs. With the predictable pretensions of indie tracks and eco-priests, and a narrative that barely considers the rebuttals to their cause, it's above all a persuasion piece. But look beneath that and you'll see a solid understanding of the problem of man's clumsy and short-sighted manipulation of the country's ecosystem. Even better, it offers a feasible path for progress, and reasonable methods on how to pursue it. In other words, look past the frivolities and accept the impact.

  • Jun 02, 2015

    It's difficult for many to admit that maybe we went overboard. Maybe it was a great way to give a bunch of people jobs when they needed them most. Maybe the large lakes that we love, aren't the best thing for the habitat. Should all damns go? Probably not. Could many of them go? Without a doubt. I think this move was well done. It was obviously leaning one way, but it doesn't hurt to hear a different opinion than your own. Heaven forbid we see both sides.

    It's difficult for many to admit that maybe we went overboard. Maybe it was a great way to give a bunch of people jobs when they needed them most. Maybe the large lakes that we love, aren't the best thing for the habitat. Should all damns go? Probably not. Could many of them go? Without a doubt. I think this move was well done. It was obviously leaning one way, but it doesn't hurt to hear a different opinion than your own. Heaven forbid we see both sides.

  • Apr 19, 2015

    If Dam Nation feels scattered or like it is preaching to the choir, then perhaps you should spend more time near rivers. Or on a fishing boat, or on the Upper Snake River and watch one of the few, last ragged salmon that's made it past all 4 Lower Snake River dams return to spawn there. As a 6th generation Washingtonian, I feel this movie touches down solidly on the narrative surrounding the environmental devastation that dams have brought to our locale. We have 81 orca whales left in the Salish sea. What do orca whales eat? Most remaining wild salmon runs will be extinct by the end of our children's lifetimes, if not already. If you are unable to process the message of this film, and instead critique the stylistic attributes, or feel it is one sided, you are missing the boat, and you are going to miss it for eternity. And your children as well. There is nothing left to do but remove outdated dams. Outdated, not all. I've watched this movie 3 times. The first 2, I was stone cold sober, and found the film's flow solid and charged, informative and straightforward. Only the 3rd time, sharing it with my mother, after several glasses of wine, did I find it slightly disjointed. So, maybe drink less liquor, and think in geological terms, cultural terms, beyond this century terms. Maybe, open your eyes to the fact that salmon are real, but not for long. Maybe, if you can imagine that we need salmon, you'll be able to cry a tear or two at what's been lost. My mother, by the way, is a lifelong resident of Washington too. Grew up as the daughter of conservative wheat farmers along the Snake River near Lewiston. She now lives near Seattle and fishes for salmon in Puget Sound every year. This film opened her eyes to the reality of the rivers she loves and the resources at stake, because, believe me, there is no need to worry about the other side of this story. It's all we have heard, and it's gotten us nowhere. If you don't like the movie, sorry. Maybe you just don't care enough about salmon.

    If Dam Nation feels scattered or like it is preaching to the choir, then perhaps you should spend more time near rivers. Or on a fishing boat, or on the Upper Snake River and watch one of the few, last ragged salmon that's made it past all 4 Lower Snake River dams return to spawn there. As a 6th generation Washingtonian, I feel this movie touches down solidly on the narrative surrounding the environmental devastation that dams have brought to our locale. We have 81 orca whales left in the Salish sea. What do orca whales eat? Most remaining wild salmon runs will be extinct by the end of our children's lifetimes, if not already. If you are unable to process the message of this film, and instead critique the stylistic attributes, or feel it is one sided, you are missing the boat, and you are going to miss it for eternity. And your children as well. There is nothing left to do but remove outdated dams. Outdated, not all. I've watched this movie 3 times. The first 2, I was stone cold sober, and found the film's flow solid and charged, informative and straightforward. Only the 3rd time, sharing it with my mother, after several glasses of wine, did I find it slightly disjointed. So, maybe drink less liquor, and think in geological terms, cultural terms, beyond this century terms. Maybe, open your eyes to the fact that salmon are real, but not for long. Maybe, if you can imagine that we need salmon, you'll be able to cry a tear or two at what's been lost. My mother, by the way, is a lifelong resident of Washington too. Grew up as the daughter of conservative wheat farmers along the Snake River near Lewiston. She now lives near Seattle and fishes for salmon in Puget Sound every year. This film opened her eyes to the reality of the rivers she loves and the resources at stake, because, believe me, there is no need to worry about the other side of this story. It's all we have heard, and it's gotten us nowhere. If you don't like the movie, sorry. Maybe you just don't care enough about salmon.

  • Jan 15, 2015

    Great movie that documents the efforts of concerned citizens trying to restore our natural beauty and resources.

    Great movie that documents the efforts of concerned citizens trying to restore our natural beauty and resources.