Detachment Reviews

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July 13, 2012
If Detachment is only partially successful, it is still more watchable than most school sagas.
July 12, 2012
It's watchable enough, but the bludgeoning screenplay seems undercooked compared to the high-grade actors on show.
July 12, 2012
It's a vaguely elegant brute of a film, but a long way from Kaye's best.
May 10, 2012
A loud, grating wallow in dime-store despair.
May 4, 2012
The film is guilty of reverse sentimentality, where the relentless unhappiness comes to seem as manufactured and artificial as the schmaltz in a romcom.
May 3, 2012
Detachment gets an A for enthusiasm but a C for execution.
March 22, 2012
There's something weirdly effective about the artistic desperation, which includes inserts of chalkboard animation and to-the-camera testimonials.
March 22, 2012
Everywhere you turn in Detachment, someone is trying to make you feel like hell.
March 16, 2012
Detachment gets to you. It hits hard.
March 16, 2012
It wants to be an expose of the pervasive horrors of modern life. Instead, it just forces us to detach as well.
March 16, 2012
"Detachment" quickly gets stuck in its own world-weariness.
March 15, 2012
Even at its most ludicrous - when it is shouting into your ear - its sheer audacity grabs your attention.
Top Critic
March 15, 2012
[Brody] is undermined by a bloated script (from Carl Lund, a former public-school teacher) that lumbers him with bloviating asides about how we have failed our children.
March 15, 2012
It's nice to see righteous anger in a movie. If only the education drama "Detachment" knew what to do with it.
Top Critic
March 15, 2012
Kaye frequently flirts with familiar tropes, but here, he takes them in a loving embrace, betraying a rank sentimentality the film otherwise avoids.
March 14, 2012
Brody, as the semi-fallen idealist, has a haggard eloquence, and Tim Blake Nelson, Christina Hendricks, and James Caan, as his colleagues, act out a bitterly funny spectrum of desolation.
March 13, 2012
The movie is one big scream, clichéd and hardly credible as an oblique call to civility.
Top Critic
March 13, 2012
Adrien Brody, one of the weirdest looking actors of the millennium, plays Henry Barthes, a man so emotionally blocked by a lifetime of disillusion that he cannot connect with any other human being.
March 13, 2012
The movie's motives might be admirable, but its execution is so bogged down in impenetrable old-white-guy self-pity that the real problems facing public education and its practitioners get buried in the wallow.
March 13, 2012
The movie works, and, though it cries out against so much, you sense that the one thing it does not cry is wolf.
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