Diaz: Don't Clean Up This Blood Reviews

  • Feb 09, 2019

    In July of 2001, over 200.000 people took to the streets of Genoa in protest against a meeting of the G8 - the group of the worlds' eight most powerful industrial countries whose summit decisions were to have a global impact on the world. In the aftermath of the protest, there were hundreds of injured, and 23-year-old activist Carlo Giuliani was killed when he confronted a Carabinieri vehicle. He was shot with a firearm and was ran over twice by a police Land Rover. Day after this big anti-globalist protests in Genoa, the police organized a night raid on the Diaz school, where the temporary headquarters of the Genoa Social Forum was located, alongside with Indymedia - an independent media organization, as well as activist lawyers who provided free legal services to protest participants and collected documentation on the police brutality during the protests. At the moment when 500 members of the police and carabinieri stormed the building, there were around one hundred people sleeping inside, among them many journalists and young people who came from different European countries to take part in the protest. The film relies on documentary material and depicts these events extremely realistically, especially the atrocious police beating of everyone they came across in the building, seriously wounding many people, causing some to sustain life-critical injuries and even coma. Those who did not end up on the life support in the hospital were arrested and transferred to a police barracks where they were abused and brutally tortured for several more days. In addition to extreme brutality against activists, police destroyed a large amount of computer and media equipment, took all hard drives and destroyed all cameras they found in the building. After that, police officers went on to set up a false evidence campaign aiming to present this school as a black block stronghold, as well as an improvised hospital for people with existing injuries from the protests. It is important to understand that this attack wasn't accidental in any way. It was planned at the highest levels of police and government. Besides destroying computer equipment and evidence against the police, the goal was to criminalize the movement and instigate a media lynching, but also to deeply traumatize a large number of activists and thus passivize or break the protest movement. The gruesome police violence during the Diaz raid that is presented can be compared with the cult film "The Strawberry Statement", which covers the Columbia University protests of 1968 and the brutal intervention of the US Police and National Guard. Particularly interesting is the fact that afterward no police officer was tried for torture, because in 2001 the Italian law did not recognize torture as a criminal offense. Movie scenes of humiliation and torture that took place after the transfer of the arrestees into the police barracks are irresistibly reminiscent of films about military-fascist dictatorships in Latin America. It's the same politics, the same method, the same interests. This film should be a kind of a lesson to anyone involved in any protest or social movements. Know what to expect if a protest actually jeopardizes someone's interests - in the sense that every social conflict is part of the struggle between social classes. Although this struggle is mainly of low intensity, contended to individual strikes and protests, if a movement actually threatens the interests of the ruling class, the conflict will soon turn into a class war in which the ruling class won't choose the means, nor heed to victims. It is therefore crucial to understand the class nature of the society we live in, and the implications it has. One certainly shouldn't be naive and think that the state and the police have anything to do with law or justice.

    In July of 2001, over 200.000 people took to the streets of Genoa in protest against a meeting of the G8 - the group of the worlds' eight most powerful industrial countries whose summit decisions were to have a global impact on the world. In the aftermath of the protest, there were hundreds of injured, and 23-year-old activist Carlo Giuliani was killed when he confronted a Carabinieri vehicle. He was shot with a firearm and was ran over twice by a police Land Rover. Day after this big anti-globalist protests in Genoa, the police organized a night raid on the Diaz school, where the temporary headquarters of the Genoa Social Forum was located, alongside with Indymedia - an independent media organization, as well as activist lawyers who provided free legal services to protest participants and collected documentation on the police brutality during the protests. At the moment when 500 members of the police and carabinieri stormed the building, there were around one hundred people sleeping inside, among them many journalists and young people who came from different European countries to take part in the protest. The film relies on documentary material and depicts these events extremely realistically, especially the atrocious police beating of everyone they came across in the building, seriously wounding many people, causing some to sustain life-critical injuries and even coma. Those who did not end up on the life support in the hospital were arrested and transferred to a police barracks where they were abused and brutally tortured for several more days. In addition to extreme brutality against activists, police destroyed a large amount of computer and media equipment, took all hard drives and destroyed all cameras they found in the building. After that, police officers went on to set up a false evidence campaign aiming to present this school as a black block stronghold, as well as an improvised hospital for people with existing injuries from the protests. It is important to understand that this attack wasn't accidental in any way. It was planned at the highest levels of police and government. Besides destroying computer equipment and evidence against the police, the goal was to criminalize the movement and instigate a media lynching, but also to deeply traumatize a large number of activists and thus passivize or break the protest movement. The gruesome police violence during the Diaz raid that is presented can be compared with the cult film "The Strawberry Statement", which covers the Columbia University protests of 1968 and the brutal intervention of the US Police and National Guard. Particularly interesting is the fact that afterward no police officer was tried for torture, because in 2001 the Italian law did not recognize torture as a criminal offense. Movie scenes of humiliation and torture that took place after the transfer of the arrestees into the police barracks are irresistibly reminiscent of films about military-fascist dictatorships in Latin America. It's the same politics, the same method, the same interests. This film should be a kind of a lesson to anyone involved in any protest or social movements. Know what to expect if a protest actually jeopardizes someone's interests - in the sense that every social conflict is part of the struggle between social classes. Although this struggle is mainly of low intensity, contended to individual strikes and protests, if a movement actually threatens the interests of the ruling class, the conflict will soon turn into a class war in which the ruling class won't choose the means, nor heed to victims. It is therefore crucial to understand the class nature of the society we live in, and the implications it has. One certainly shouldn't be naive and think that the state and the police have anything to do with law or justice.

  • Jul 22, 2013

    die hier gezeigte gewalt der italienischen polizei lässte einen fassungslos zurück....die unruhen des g8 gipfels in genua wurden hier beeindruckend dargestellt...sollte man sehen

    die hier gezeigte gewalt der italienischen polizei lässte einen fassungslos zurück....die unruhen des g8 gipfels in genua wurden hier beeindruckend dargestellt...sollte man sehen

  • Jun 15, 2013

    very thought provoking. I know its a drama but I wonder how close to the truth it is. police brutality was shameful.

    very thought provoking. I know its a drama but I wonder how close to the truth it is. police brutality was shameful.

  • May 18, 2013

    La notte del 21 luglio 2001 93 persone, di età, nazionalità e condizione sociale differente, si trovano a pernottare nella scuola Diaz, messa a disposizione dal comune di Genova come dormitorio, sede del media center e dell'assistenza legale dell'organismo promotore, dopo che, durante la giornata, un automezzo della polizia, passato più volte di fronte all'edificio, è stato per alcuni momenti circondato da un gruppo di no-global e fatto oggetto del lancio, andato a vuoto, di una bottiglia di vetro; le vicende di alcune di loro si intrecciano con gli avvenimenti che seguiranno. Luca è un giornalista della Gazzetta di Bologna (giornale politicamente collocato a destra), il quale, a seguito dell'arrivo in redazione della notizia della morte di Carlo Giuliani, in seguito agli scontri per il G8, avvenuti il 20 luglio, decide di recarsi personalmente a Genova per documentare l'evolversi dei fatti. Alma è un'anarchica tedesca che ha partecipato agli scontri ed è rimasta sconvolta per la violenza cui ha assistito che, insieme a Marco, facente parte dell'organizzazione del Social Forum, ed alla amica Franci, un avvocato del Genoa Legal forum, si mette a disposizione per la ricerca dei dispersi. Nick è un manager che si occupa di economia solidale e che si trova a Genova per un seminario. Anselmo è un anziano militante del Sindacato Pensionati della CGIL, che ha preso parte alle manifestazioni sindacali contro il G8, prendendo parte al corteo pacifico. Bea e Ralf sono a Genova di passaggio e devono ripartire per altre mete ma, in attesa della partenza, decidono di pernottare in città, utilizzando uno degli alloggi messi a disposizione dei manifestanti. Etienne e Cecile sono due anarchici francesi, diretti protagonisti della guerriglia e degli scontri di quei giorni. Max è un vicequestore aggiunto del primo reparto mobile di Roma, il quale si è attirato le critiche di molti colleghi perché in mattinata ha preso la decisione di non ordinare una carica contro i black-block, al fine di evitare il coinvolgimento di tanti pacifici manifestanti addossati ad una scogliera. I destini di tutti loro e di altri manifestanti si incrociano drammaticamente quando, dopo le 23.00 circa, 350 poliziotti fanno irruzione nella scuola, allo scopo di giustificare agli occhi dell'opinione pubblica sia il mancato mantenimento dell'ordine pubblico durante le grandi manifestazioni di protesta che il comportamento violento delle forze dell'ordine durante le giornate precedenti, procedura già precedentemente messa in atto con un furgone, filmato da un elicottero, dal quale vengono distribuite spranghe ed altri oggetti contundenti ai manifestanti da soggetti in seguito mai identificati, lamentando inoltre l'aggressione subita dall'automezzo della polizia alcune ore prima. L'irruzione si svolge rapidamente e senza resistenza da parte dei presenti ma, nonostante nell'edificio non si trovino i black block, gli agenti aggrediscono le persone all'interno della scuola con inaudita violenza e sadismo e queste, dopo essere state ferite, alcune in modo grave, vengono arrestate e lo stesso destino subiscono coloro che, a causa delle ferite, sono state immediatamente trasportate in ospedale, prolungando, dopo essere state rinchiuse nella caserma di Bolzaneto, l'universo di violenza già subito durante l'irruzione. Il regista ha riferito che, leggendo le carte processuali, si ha l'impressione che la polizia sentisse la necessità di riequilibrare la situazione a suo favore e che fosse disposta a farlo anche con verbali falsi e disseminando prove costruite a tavolino, come il ritrovamento di armi improprie e due bombe molotov che furono portate nella scuola Diaz dagli stessi agenti [it.wikipedia.org]

    La notte del 21 luglio 2001 93 persone, di età, nazionalità e condizione sociale differente, si trovano a pernottare nella scuola Diaz, messa a disposizione dal comune di Genova come dormitorio, sede del media center e dell'assistenza legale dell'organismo promotore, dopo che, durante la giornata, un automezzo della polizia, passato più volte di fronte all'edificio, è stato per alcuni momenti circondato da un gruppo di no-global e fatto oggetto del lancio, andato a vuoto, di una bottiglia di vetro; le vicende di alcune di loro si intrecciano con gli avvenimenti che seguiranno. Luca è un giornalista della Gazzetta di Bologna (giornale politicamente collocato a destra), il quale, a seguito dell'arrivo in redazione della notizia della morte di Carlo Giuliani, in seguito agli scontri per il G8, avvenuti il 20 luglio, decide di recarsi personalmente a Genova per documentare l'evolversi dei fatti. Alma è un'anarchica tedesca che ha partecipato agli scontri ed è rimasta sconvolta per la violenza cui ha assistito che, insieme a Marco, facente parte dell'organizzazione del Social Forum, ed alla amica Franci, un avvocato del Genoa Legal forum, si mette a disposizione per la ricerca dei dispersi. Nick è un manager che si occupa di economia solidale e che si trova a Genova per un seminario. Anselmo è un anziano militante del Sindacato Pensionati della CGIL, che ha preso parte alle manifestazioni sindacali contro il G8, prendendo parte al corteo pacifico. Bea e Ralf sono a Genova di passaggio e devono ripartire per altre mete ma, in attesa della partenza, decidono di pernottare in città, utilizzando uno degli alloggi messi a disposizione dei manifestanti. Etienne e Cecile sono due anarchici francesi, diretti protagonisti della guerriglia e degli scontri di quei giorni. Max è un vicequestore aggiunto del primo reparto mobile di Roma, il quale si è attirato le critiche di molti colleghi perché in mattinata ha preso la decisione di non ordinare una carica contro i black-block, al fine di evitare il coinvolgimento di tanti pacifici manifestanti addossati ad una scogliera. I destini di tutti loro e di altri manifestanti si incrociano drammaticamente quando, dopo le 23.00 circa, 350 poliziotti fanno irruzione nella scuola, allo scopo di giustificare agli occhi dell'opinione pubblica sia il mancato mantenimento dell'ordine pubblico durante le grandi manifestazioni di protesta che il comportamento violento delle forze dell'ordine durante le giornate precedenti, procedura già precedentemente messa in atto con un furgone, filmato da un elicottero, dal quale vengono distribuite spranghe ed altri oggetti contundenti ai manifestanti da soggetti in seguito mai identificati, lamentando inoltre l'aggressione subita dall'automezzo della polizia alcune ore prima. L'irruzione si svolge rapidamente e senza resistenza da parte dei presenti ma, nonostante nell'edificio non si trovino i black block, gli agenti aggrediscono le persone all'interno della scuola con inaudita violenza e sadismo e queste, dopo essere state ferite, alcune in modo grave, vengono arrestate e lo stesso destino subiscono coloro che, a causa delle ferite, sono state immediatamente trasportate in ospedale, prolungando, dopo essere state rinchiuse nella caserma di Bolzaneto, l'universo di violenza già subito durante l'irruzione. Il regista ha riferito che, leggendo le carte processuali, si ha l'impressione che la polizia sentisse la necessità di riequilibrare la situazione a suo favore e che fosse disposta a farlo anche con verbali falsi e disseminando prove costruite a tavolino, come il ritrovamento di armi improprie e due bombe molotov che furono portate nella scuola Diaz dagli stessi agenti [it.wikipedia.org]

  • May 12, 2013

    My rating is more induced for the denunciation of the facts that really happened than for the movie itself, told closer to the documentary than in a cinematographic way (it would be around 2.5 stars, but with some climax moments).

    My rating is more induced for the denunciation of the facts that really happened than for the movie itself, told closer to the documentary than in a cinematographic way (it would be around 2.5 stars, but with some climax moments).

  • Apr 16, 2013

    E' uscito lo stesso anno di A.C.A.B. parla di poliziotti e violenza, ma ha un taglio completamente diverso. Il film parte e per la prima mezz'ora e' veramente brutto: lento e recitato in modo agghiacciante. Poi partono le scene di violenza: cruda e forte. Il film a questo punto prende forza e diventa un vero film di denuncia.

    E' uscito lo stesso anno di A.C.A.B. parla di poliziotti e violenza, ma ha un taglio completamente diverso. Il film parte e per la prima mezz'ora e' veramente brutto: lento e recitato in modo agghiacciante. Poi partono le scene di violenza: cruda e forte. Il film a questo punto prende forza e diventa un vero film di denuncia.

  • Nov 09, 2012

    Technically it's not a good movie: too many crossing stories, different languages and a circling editing make it difficult to follow especially for whom is not aware of the facts. But it's a movie that everybody should see and it's a really scaring horror film! A must anyway, just to keep in mind how's reality. Il clou del film è nella frase che il capo dei celerini dice al questore prima dell'attacco alla scuola: non so per quanto posso controllarli. come dei tori infuriati... degli animali... no comment!

    Technically it's not a good movie: too many crossing stories, different languages and a circling editing make it difficult to follow especially for whom is not aware of the facts. But it's a movie that everybody should see and it's a really scaring horror film! A must anyway, just to keep in mind how's reality. Il clou del film è nella frase che il capo dei celerini dice al questore prima dell'attacco alla scuola: non so per quanto posso controllarli. come dei tori infuriati... degli animali... no comment!

  • Sep 29, 2012

    Very strong (graphical violence, yet based on real story) movie about police brutality and the limits of capitalist democracy. Ends with a message of powerlessness towards the fascist riot control police of Italy or any weak institutions country in the world really.

    Very strong (graphical violence, yet based on real story) movie about police brutality and the limits of capitalist democracy. Ends with a message of powerlessness towards the fascist riot control police of Italy or any weak institutions country in the world really.