Dogville - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Dogville Reviews

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½ July 22, 2016
Dogville is a thought-provoking slice of arthouse storytelling, which is not to say that it's easy to watch or even that it's without its pretensions. It is merely to say that you will rarely see something so original and minimal.
June 4, 2016
Is mercy & forgiveness just the highest degree arrogance? The harsh implication so studiously understated is an indictment that can only be stated indirectly. I disagree with this tediously presented argument intellectually & emotionally, but not viscerally & that scares me.
May 20, 2016
Although huge ensemble cast and unique take on movie story telling, the movie is dry, emotionless and a drag. 3 hours of grasping for straws of any humain interaction.
May 17, 2016
That was thinking out of the box! The first "theatrical" movie anybody has dared to present. Very unusual at the beginning. Very lengthy at almost 3 hours for a "movie" which not an epic but the ending saved the day. Disturbing yet thought provoking. Supposed to be Anti-american as I heard. This was an experience that dragged a little bit but also one which I'll never forget and had me thinking for some time after it was over.
½ April 3, 2016
It's a piece of art. The scenery, the creativity, it's just magcial. Though I haven't quite aprove the whole acting of Nicole Kidman, it was worth my time. Arrogance, what a common demon we all have inside.
March 21, 2016
originally and braveness of the director
March 15, 2016
One of the best films I've ever seen - looking at America from the outside, as the rest of the world must do. Nicole Kidman is one of the few actresses still alive who can evoke vulnerability and power simultaneously. The story touches on good and evil, mercy and revenge, and suggests that most people are capable of both. The Depression era setting is once again relevant to our times. This is a film you will either love or hate, but for me it confirms that Lars Von Trier is one of the most brilliant filmmakers around.
½ February 13, 2016
"Dogville", narrated in elegant poetic prose, is a movie about a city lady who, fleeing a group of mafia, took refuge in an isolated American village and tried to win trust of the villagers. On a deeper level, the film is an incredibly dark story of human hypocrisy, secret yearnings, unspeakable crimes, crippling guilt, self-defensive denial, and rationalisation of selfishness. I think it is an excellent, excellent film.

It is excellent, first of all, in its showing how evil can spread, like a plague, in a community of otherwise passably decent people. In this respect, it is similar to "The Hunt" (Thomas Vinterberg, 2013), another brilliant film that depicts how evil can arise in a close-knit community of kind, caring people. (But while "The Hunt" is, I think, a realistic study of evil, "Dogville" doesn't aim to be completely realistic. It exaggerates and also satirises.)

The film is also excellent in its portrayal of how people hide, suppress, and release their jealousy, sexual desires, ill will, and their moral fetish for punishment of others. The film portrays the forms of these actions accurately and insightfully, I think, even though it exaggerates the magnitude of the desires to unrealistic levels.

The film seems satirical in some places, but serious in other places. With fierce pointedness (helped by the poetic narration), it satirises how people put up an appearance of decency as a facade for hypocrisy and cruelty. Meanwhile, some parts of the film are, I think, intended as serious messages about human nature.

Where it is intended to be serious, the film propagates very conservative messages indeed. It gives justification for draconian laws, tit-for-tat violence, corporal punishment, and strict moral education. Given that the film paints an unrealistically dark picture of human nature, the moral conclusions it draws from that picture should not be taken seriously.
January 31, 2016
Theatre, film, rotten society, maybe one of the best films ever
January 27, 2016
BRAVO
Viewed this on 27/1/16
Simply a MASTERPIECE. Lars Von Trier sees darkness in everything in this world and his film is haunting, unnerving piece of experiment cinema that is merciless. Perhaps my favourite Trier film and Roger Ebert, fuck you and people like you who hate this one. It twists you, often breaks you with the cruelty of the world and the vulnerability of innocence, boy what an ending, simply loved it. It was an ending I wanted to see while watching some of the most horrendous scenes of the film and one that I never expected to happen.
January 6, 2016
Dogville depicts the happenings of a humble little American town, of the same name, when a troubled newcomer stumbles into town and begins to stir its residents out of their comfort zone. It is the first movie in director Lars Von Trier's USA: Land of Opportunities series that follows a woman named Grace, portrayed here by Nicole Kidman, as she moves through America experiencing its history and culture. Here, she has somewhat of a backwards Cinderella story as Von Trier strips the idea of a small American town down to its bare essentials.

The entire film takes place in a black box on a sound stage where the buildings and locations of the town are outlined in chalk on the floor, like a life size map with minimal props around to sell the idea that this is where these citizens live. It's strange for a fully fledged film, but it doesn't take long to get used to, as the story and characters are enticing enough to fill in the gaps for a suspension of belief. Before long, you won't even notice that walls don't hide anything from anyone and the mine at the edge of town isn't just a series of wooden arches.

With a background that is mostly black, the cinematography is pretty limited to a few interesting lighting effects and pulling focus to the actors at hand. It seems that it would be very fun and freeing for an actor to be able to work with an ensemble cast on a project like this. The ensemble is so filled with great actors that there are too many to name them all, but the chemistry among them is smooth, fitting them together like pieces of a complete puzzle. They all get their moments to shine within the stories that intertwine these households together.

Dogville is somehow a convincing combination of several mediums, film, the stage and prose, that could have gone horribly wrong. All three of these mediums have different ways of telling the same story that need to be taken into account when adapting from one to the other, but here, they all work separately and simultaneously together without becoming a jumbled mess. This is like a filmed production of a stage show playing out the actions read from a novel, with John Hurts as the voice of God narrating the actions, thoughts, backgrounds and feelings of all of the characters, which sounds a bit much but actually ends up being simple and lovely.

Though it does still tread that balance of realism and fantasy, this is very different for a film from Lars Von Trier. It is much less involved and simple, in a way, but that lends itself to how Von Trier may be perceiving America, a place the director hasn't really experienced first hand, and it's people who have long been critically harsh and at odds with him. Even still, Dogville manages to be yet another bitter and thought provoking look at life and the struggles we experience.
January 3, 2016
Simply a masterpiece!
December 5, 2015
drab and very forgettable.
½ December 3, 2015
Maybe I am just not "artsy" enough to enjoy this movie. I understand the statement the director is trying to make with this picture. And yes, it is very unique the way it is show. The movie is filmed all on one soundstage, set up like a town. To me this is Von Triers just being strange and disturbing for no reason once again. His movies have a meaning underneath all the stuff he puts on screen, and his movies are obviously not made for the masses, that is quite clear. Basically a girl ends up in a small nice town and everyone seemingly is good hearted and nice to her. She eventually is chained up like a dog and used as a sex slave for the guys in town, they take turns with her. Then she leaves and comes back and gets her revenge and kills everyone in the town. End of story, don't bother with this movie, keep on moving.
November 30, 2015
Maybe I am just not "artsy" enough to enjoy this movie. I understand the statement the director is trying to make with this picture. And yes, it is very unique the way it is show. The movie is filmed all on one soundstage, set up like a town. To me this is Von Triers just being strange and disturbing for no reason once again. His movies have a meaning underneath all the stuff he puts on screen, and his movies are obviously not made for the masses, that is quite clear. Basically a girl ends up in a small nice town and everyone seemingly is good hearted and nice to her. She eventually is chained up like a dog and used as a sex slave for the guys in town, they take turns with her. Then she leaves and comes back and gets her revenge and kills everyone in the town. End of story, don't bother with this movie, keep on moving.
November 8, 2015
Like reading a novel...
October 14, 2015
At least the ending is decent. But really I'd rather not have seen the movie at all.
Robert B.
Super Reviewer
½ September 30, 2015
Dogville is a talented work, yes, but is it a great film? No, It's not great. The ending is flat, especially for such a long buildup. It's not wholly a film either. It's not that the stage play thing is wrong, it's fine (especially since the story is reminiscent of Greek tragedy). The problem is that it is lacking in light and sound. Maybe that is a good thing since the second half is heavy and long and feels real enough as it is. Still, Dogville is definitely a film to watch for two reasons: (1) an excellent performance by Nicole Kidman and (2) food for thought, one is definitely given a few things to think about. But be warned, this is not a film one watches to be entertained.
½ July 23, 2015
As with other Lars Von Trier's films, it's the experience (as an audience while watching the film) is what you will find remarkable and beautiful. Compelling piece of experimental film. Not for everyone but it was good! :) Nicole Kidman is exceptional.
½ July 6, 2015
A twisted Americana in a dark reflection of "Our Town". A tad long and heavy-handed, but the concept is fascinating, sparse settings giving light to characters both ignorant and interesting.
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