Driving Miss Daisy Reviews

  • 1d ago

    Great movie!! Kinda of sad!

    Great movie!! Kinda of sad!

  • Feb 06, 2020

    A modern tale of heart, wit and warmth. Driving Miss Daisy is the reason I love going back to older generations of films because you'll never know if you find one or come across a true warranted gem. The imagery, performances, cinematography, editing, writing and directing are all impeccable!

    A modern tale of heart, wit and warmth. Driving Miss Daisy is the reason I love going back to older generations of films because you'll never know if you find one or come across a true warranted gem. The imagery, performances, cinematography, editing, writing and directing are all impeccable!

  • Jan 22, 2020

    Why it won so many Oscars I'm not quite sure. The acting as far as the female lead and the male supporting actor goes is fairly good. I appreciate seeing them grow closer over the years and as they see that they have a fair amount in common. I see the growth which many great stories have. However I dont see much else that is interesting about this story. An old Jewish lady needs a driver to take her to and throw. They develop a friendship. But is there really much else going on in this picture? Not particularly. It just didn't grab me. I cant say I can relate to it in any way. Maybe this worked better on the stage. I'm not sure. Miss Daisy Werthan: Hoke, you're my best friend.

    Why it won so many Oscars I'm not quite sure. The acting as far as the female lead and the male supporting actor goes is fairly good. I appreciate seeing them grow closer over the years and as they see that they have a fair amount in common. I see the growth which many great stories have. However I dont see much else that is interesting about this story. An old Jewish lady needs a driver to take her to and throw. They develop a friendship. But is there really much else going on in this picture? Not particularly. It just didn't grab me. I cant say I can relate to it in any way. Maybe this worked better on the stage. I'm not sure. Miss Daisy Werthan: Hoke, you're my best friend.

  • Jan 12, 2020

    Sweet performances, calmly, charmly directed. A 'Feel Good, Cute Movie'.

    Sweet performances, calmly, charmly directed. A 'Feel Good, Cute Movie'.

  • Dec 21, 2019

    love this movie it's beautiful movie everyone should watch it

    love this movie it's beautiful movie everyone should watch it

  • May 20, 2019

    I really wanted to like this film because many people consider it to be one of the worst, or most overrated Best Picture winners, and I enjoy being a contrarian. Unfortunately I found as little to like about the film as most people do and the treatment of the African-American characters felt patronizing at best. I quite like Crimes of the Heart (1986) and Rich in Love (1992) so I wanted to see director Bruce Beresford's tender, sweet directorial style applied to more serious subject matter, sadly he couldn't save a poorly written film. In the year of When Harry Met Sallyï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 (1989) it seems ridiculous that this forgettable but verging on offensive little film took the big prize. Daisy Werthan, Jessica Tandy, is an aging Southern widow who struggles to drive but is just as stubborn as ever when her son Boolie, Dan Aykroyd, essentially pushes an African-American driver Hoke Colburn, Morgan Freeman, on her. Over the next 25 years the two develop a strong bond, purportedly, as she faces up to her racism in the age of the civil rights movement. When she becomes senile and is moved into a hospital Hoke continues to support her and the two remain friends as they sit down and talk at the end of the film. A lot of reviewers praised this film for it's ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~subtlety' in showing Werthan's shift from racist to friend of Hoke's and non-prejudiced person. To me the shift wasn't subtle it was just non-existent as the main character remains rude and disrespectful of Hoke while he acts like a perfect angel and puts up with her offensive remarks while laughing at her bad ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~jokes'. I needed something to explain how she had changed, become a better person and come to understand that her prejudices against African-Americans were wrong. No, I didn't need the film to be as graceless as Green Book (2018) in it's presentation of the enlightenment of a racist character but at least in that film we get moments that endear us to the main character. If this film was going to go full white savior I at least needed to see why the white character was a positive influence on the African-American's life. The issue is not the performances of the two leads with Tandy and Freeman trying their damnedest to bring to life characters that are flat on the page but Aykroyd felt completely out of place and his Southern accent was unconvincing. Tandy does a good job with her accent and the various mannerisms of an uptight older lady, she sells her moments of pain as she feels neglected by her son and fully commits to making her character insufferable. Freeman is reliably charming as the driver and his quiet anger and hurt as he is humiliated by two racist police officers was powerful. Aykroyd comes in and ruins the beautiful subtlety in the performances of the two leads as he fudges all of his lines and acts more like a character in a Harold Ramis directed film than in a prestige picture about race relations. The positive aspects of the film, there were few, were the cinematography and the score. The South is a beautiful place, as proven by the much better Fried Green Tomatoes (1991), and we get to see the flowers in the trees and the idyllic rural landscapes in all their glory. Hans Zimmer who also contributed his skills to 1988's Best Picture winner Rain Man produces the most fun element of the film as his score contains several bright, inspiring compositions that keep the film going as it repeatedly drags. I'm not going to lie, When Harry Met Sallyï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 is one of my favorite films of the 1980s and it's lack of Best Picture nomination incenses me. When considering the 1989 Best Picture nominees they are relatively weak but I would consider Born on the Fourth of July to be the best. Obviously I would have rewarded that film over this awkwardly mishandled tale of ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~friendship' between a horrible woman and an unbelievably patient and understanding man. I would not recommend this film to anybody unless they want to see this part of the world shot beautifully, in which case there are several other films that do that better, which isn't exactly incentive to sit down for nearly two hours of white savior narrative.

    I really wanted to like this film because many people consider it to be one of the worst, or most overrated Best Picture winners, and I enjoy being a contrarian. Unfortunately I found as little to like about the film as most people do and the treatment of the African-American characters felt patronizing at best. I quite like Crimes of the Heart (1986) and Rich in Love (1992) so I wanted to see director Bruce Beresford's tender, sweet directorial style applied to more serious subject matter, sadly he couldn't save a poorly written film. In the year of When Harry Met Sallyï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 (1989) it seems ridiculous that this forgettable but verging on offensive little film took the big prize. Daisy Werthan, Jessica Tandy, is an aging Southern widow who struggles to drive but is just as stubborn as ever when her son Boolie, Dan Aykroyd, essentially pushes an African-American driver Hoke Colburn, Morgan Freeman, on her. Over the next 25 years the two develop a strong bond, purportedly, as she faces up to her racism in the age of the civil rights movement. When she becomes senile and is moved into a hospital Hoke continues to support her and the two remain friends as they sit down and talk at the end of the film. A lot of reviewers praised this film for it's ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~subtlety' in showing Werthan's shift from racist to friend of Hoke's and non-prejudiced person. To me the shift wasn't subtle it was just non-existent as the main character remains rude and disrespectful of Hoke while he acts like a perfect angel and puts up with her offensive remarks while laughing at her bad ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~jokes'. I needed something to explain how she had changed, become a better person and come to understand that her prejudices against African-Americans were wrong. No, I didn't need the film to be as graceless as Green Book (2018) in it's presentation of the enlightenment of a racist character but at least in that film we get moments that endear us to the main character. If this film was going to go full white savior I at least needed to see why the white character was a positive influence on the African-American's life. The issue is not the performances of the two leads with Tandy and Freeman trying their damnedest to bring to life characters that are flat on the page but Aykroyd felt completely out of place and his Southern accent was unconvincing. Tandy does a good job with her accent and the various mannerisms of an uptight older lady, she sells her moments of pain as she feels neglected by her son and fully commits to making her character insufferable. Freeman is reliably charming as the driver and his quiet anger and hurt as he is humiliated by two racist police officers was powerful. Aykroyd comes in and ruins the beautiful subtlety in the performances of the two leads as he fudges all of his lines and acts more like a character in a Harold Ramis directed film than in a prestige picture about race relations. The positive aspects of the film, there were few, were the cinematography and the score. The South is a beautiful place, as proven by the much better Fried Green Tomatoes (1991), and we get to see the flowers in the trees and the idyllic rural landscapes in all their glory. Hans Zimmer who also contributed his skills to 1988's Best Picture winner Rain Man produces the most fun element of the film as his score contains several bright, inspiring compositions that keep the film going as it repeatedly drags. I'm not going to lie, When Harry Met Sallyï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 is one of my favorite films of the 1980s and it's lack of Best Picture nomination incenses me. When considering the 1989 Best Picture nominees they are relatively weak but I would consider Born on the Fourth of July to be the best. Obviously I would have rewarded that film over this awkwardly mishandled tale of ï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2~friendship' between a horrible woman and an unbelievably patient and understanding man. I would not recommend this film to anybody unless they want to see this part of the world shot beautifully, in which case there are several other films that do that better, which isn't exactly incentive to sit down for nearly two hours of white savior narrative.

  • Apr 05, 2019

    Bonita y me imagino que para la época fue relevante pero para este tiempo se me hizo muy simple.

    Bonita y me imagino que para la época fue relevante pero para este tiempo se me hizo muy simple.

  • Mar 20, 2019

    Daisy is a caricature of those people we all grew up around that could never be wrong (heck, we try to push this as okay behavior for 50% of the population even today) but that if you word things the right way you can have a loving relationship with them. Working with such a person is a constant struggle of word games and oftentimes lying to make them comfortable, and it can be pretty frustrating. It's a cute little movie that shows in a way that even when we are old we can still change, even if it's only a little. Now, is would I nominate it for Best Picture? Nope, not sure why that happened... Both characters probably deserved nominations for their performances though, as they exuded their characters perfectly, and I would watch this again without complaint.

    Daisy is a caricature of those people we all grew up around that could never be wrong (heck, we try to push this as okay behavior for 50% of the population even today) but that if you word things the right way you can have a loving relationship with them. Working with such a person is a constant struggle of word games and oftentimes lying to make them comfortable, and it can be pretty frustrating. It's a cute little movie that shows in a way that even when we are old we can still change, even if it's only a little. Now, is would I nominate it for Best Picture? Nope, not sure why that happened... Both characters probably deserved nominations for their performances though, as they exuded their characters perfectly, and I would watch this again without complaint.

  • Feb 02, 2019

    A heartwarming tale of unlikely friendship, the performances are what carry the movie, although it also has a good score, good costume design, and good cinematography.

    A heartwarming tale of unlikely friendship, the performances are what carry the movie, although it also has a good score, good costume design, and good cinematography.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    One of the best movies

    One of the best movies