Easy Rider Reviews

  • Feb 02, 2020

    A way of living in a remarkable film getting all the main idea of freedom.

    A way of living in a remarkable film getting all the main idea of freedom.

  • Jan 01, 2020

    This is one of the saddest movies I've ever seen! 2 friends on motorbikes travel a cross country adventure , meeting all kinds of different kinds of people on the way. It sparks critical thinking about innocence , free bird living , hippy groups , the countercultural view and the hatred of "The Establishment" towards it. This movie has a message in it . But its sad

    This is one of the saddest movies I've ever seen! 2 friends on motorbikes travel a cross country adventure , meeting all kinds of different kinds of people on the way. It sparks critical thinking about innocence , free bird living , hippy groups , the countercultural view and the hatred of "The Establishment" towards it. This movie has a message in it . But its sad

  • Dec 19, 2019

    Idiotic drug fueled waste of time. Mostly just songs that play while they pretend to ride motorcycles. Terrible script and vacant acting.

    Idiotic drug fueled waste of time. Mostly just songs that play while they pretend to ride motorcycles. Terrible script and vacant acting.

  • Nov 18, 2019

    I am glad that independent films were popularized in the late 1960s and early 1970s as masterpieces such as Five Easy Pieces (1970) and Wanda (1970) were produced as a result of the movement but did a film this awful have to kick the whole thing off? I appreciate the fact that this is an iconic film with several indelible images that have had an impact on the public consciousness but most will not have had to sit through the full 95 minute production. Most likely they will only remember the minutes long sequence in which "Born to be Wild" plays and Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper ride motorcycles. I would recommend that viewers stick to this brief scene and not watch the following ninety minutes as even with an early Jack Nicholson performance I can't recommend this film. Amoral American motorcyclists and drug dealers Wyatt, Peter Fonda, and Billy, Dennis Hopper, successfully smuggle cocaine across the Mexico-United States border and earn enough money to support themselves as they travel to New Orleans to participate in Mardi Gras celebrations. They stop at a commune after picking up a hitchhiker and women flirt with Wyatt while allowing them to swim naked in the nearby waters. They later encounter a down on his luck lawyer, George Hanson, Jack Nicholson, when they are imprisoned in a small town and he tags along with them on their journey. After a night in which he reveals his philosophical musings he is murdered by local police officers in another small town they camp out in. The men are dejected after this event but choose to continue their journey and spend time with prostitutes while going on a drug trip. As the men leave, having not enjoyed their experience as they expected they would, they are shot down by police officers on the road. The film is a paean to the free love, hippie movement but what I took away from the film was not how great they were, how revolutionary their ideas were or how horrible the regular civilians attempting to stop their pretentious blathering were but how insufferable they are. I can appreciate a film that is a subtle, sensitive character study more committed to exploring the depth and complexity of figures or settings but this film did not tell us anything of meaning about it's characters and was so static that we never got a sense of our surroundings. Films from this time period either bashed hippie culture completely as in the case of The Green Berets (1968) or glorified them in an attempt to extract money from fickle youths as in the case of this film. A film that actually manages to provide a balanced perspective on this brief cultural movement is Milos Forman's Taking Off (1971) that acknowledges what drove the movement in it's mocking of overly conservative parents while also being critical of many of the beliefs and motivations of members of the counterculture. It would have been nice to see some consideration of the many negative aspects of the hippies instead of a self aggrandizing film that had little to say about contemporary America beyond the fact that the "System" was evil and should be destroyed, a point better made in other films. If the film has any positive elements they would be the songs, although they are awkwardly placed, and the cinematography from the legendary Laszlo Kovacs. With a soundtrack featuring Steppenwolf, The Byrds, Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix there are moments in this film that bring a smile to your face simply because of the indestructible power of this iconic music. Sadly it also reminds you of other better films that have put the music of artists like Hendrix to good use such as the terrifically funny and clever Withnail & I (1987) which isn't strictly a plot based film but it makes you care about it's characters. Kovacs does a nice job capturing the mountains of the famous American landscape through an odd golden sheen and while he may over indulge himself during the drug trip sequence that may have been all Hopper. If you want to see a ‘controversial' film from this period that still resonates today watch Midnight Cowboy (1969) because it still has a lot to offer beyond it's explicit sex scenes and soundtrack.

    I am glad that independent films were popularized in the late 1960s and early 1970s as masterpieces such as Five Easy Pieces (1970) and Wanda (1970) were produced as a result of the movement but did a film this awful have to kick the whole thing off? I appreciate the fact that this is an iconic film with several indelible images that have had an impact on the public consciousness but most will not have had to sit through the full 95 minute production. Most likely they will only remember the minutes long sequence in which "Born to be Wild" plays and Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper ride motorcycles. I would recommend that viewers stick to this brief scene and not watch the following ninety minutes as even with an early Jack Nicholson performance I can't recommend this film. Amoral American motorcyclists and drug dealers Wyatt, Peter Fonda, and Billy, Dennis Hopper, successfully smuggle cocaine across the Mexico-United States border and earn enough money to support themselves as they travel to New Orleans to participate in Mardi Gras celebrations. They stop at a commune after picking up a hitchhiker and women flirt with Wyatt while allowing them to swim naked in the nearby waters. They later encounter a down on his luck lawyer, George Hanson, Jack Nicholson, when they are imprisoned in a small town and he tags along with them on their journey. After a night in which he reveals his philosophical musings he is murdered by local police officers in another small town they camp out in. The men are dejected after this event but choose to continue their journey and spend time with prostitutes while going on a drug trip. As the men leave, having not enjoyed their experience as they expected they would, they are shot down by police officers on the road. The film is a paean to the free love, hippie movement but what I took away from the film was not how great they were, how revolutionary their ideas were or how horrible the regular civilians attempting to stop their pretentious blathering were but how insufferable they are. I can appreciate a film that is a subtle, sensitive character study more committed to exploring the depth and complexity of figures or settings but this film did not tell us anything of meaning about it's characters and was so static that we never got a sense of our surroundings. Films from this time period either bashed hippie culture completely as in the case of The Green Berets (1968) or glorified them in an attempt to extract money from fickle youths as in the case of this film. A film that actually manages to provide a balanced perspective on this brief cultural movement is Milos Forman's Taking Off (1971) that acknowledges what drove the movement in it's mocking of overly conservative parents while also being critical of many of the beliefs and motivations of members of the counterculture. It would have been nice to see some consideration of the many negative aspects of the hippies instead of a self aggrandizing film that had little to say about contemporary America beyond the fact that the "System" was evil and should be destroyed, a point better made in other films. If the film has any positive elements they would be the songs, although they are awkwardly placed, and the cinematography from the legendary Laszlo Kovacs. With a soundtrack featuring Steppenwolf, The Byrds, Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix there are moments in this film that bring a smile to your face simply because of the indestructible power of this iconic music. Sadly it also reminds you of other better films that have put the music of artists like Hendrix to good use such as the terrifically funny and clever Withnail & I (1987) which isn't strictly a plot based film but it makes you care about it's characters. Kovacs does a nice job capturing the mountains of the famous American landscape through an odd golden sheen and while he may over indulge himself during the drug trip sequence that may have been all Hopper. If you want to see a ‘controversial' film from this period that still resonates today watch Midnight Cowboy (1969) because it still has a lot to offer beyond it's explicit sex scenes and soundtrack.

  • Oct 29, 2019

    The soundtrack was groundbreaking, featuring pop and rock music instead of a traditional classical score, and thereby changing the film soundtrack forever.

    The soundtrack was groundbreaking, featuring pop and rock music instead of a traditional classical score, and thereby changing the film soundtrack forever.

  • Oct 27, 2019

    I know this is heavily steeped in the 60s, but with its subtle filmmaking confidence and kinetic editing, it still feels so ahead of its time. For half the movie, we're content to just exist in this wonderful little hippie-hangout fable…then Jack Nicholson shows up and takes it into the stratosphere. The message about American freedom is sadly as strong as ever 50 years later. HOT TAKE: the needle drops are fantastic.

    I know this is heavily steeped in the 60s, but with its subtle filmmaking confidence and kinetic editing, it still feels so ahead of its time. For half the movie, we're content to just exist in this wonderful little hippie-hangout fable…then Jack Nicholson shows up and takes it into the stratosphere. The message about American freedom is sadly as strong as ever 50 years later. HOT TAKE: the needle drops are fantastic.

  • Oct 12, 2019

    when this film i was in high school and was playing in a cover band and doing gigs and when wed stop to eat after a gig in our van and with our long hair wed run into that same kind of crap in the tennessee diners we'd eat at.it was scarey especially being teenagers and having so called adults talking smack about us so this movie was not farfetched for its time.great film

    when this film i was in high school and was playing in a cover band and doing gigs and when wed stop to eat after a gig in our van and with our long hair wed run into that same kind of crap in the tennessee diners we'd eat at.it was scarey especially being teenagers and having so called adults talking smack about us so this movie was not farfetched for its time.great film

  • Aug 25, 2019

    Wtf... this is iconic?? Not seeing it...

    Wtf... this is iconic?? Not seeing it...

  • Aug 23, 2019

    A complete piece of crap. Unbelievable that a film like this be considered a classic and part of the Criterium Collection.

    A complete piece of crap. Unbelievable that a film like this be considered a classic and part of the Criterium Collection.

  • Aug 20, 2019

    Easy Rider is a 1969 American independent road drama film directed by Dennis Hopper. I was extremely disappointed with this cult classic. Apart from the charismatic performance by Nicholson, there is little here of interest. The poor performances and editing certainly don't help. Although most of the songs are good to listen too, there are far too many for the minimal dialogue and lack of narrative. It may be considered a culturally significant film, but it is not entertaining viewing. Considered to be one of the greatest films of all time. 1001

    Easy Rider is a 1969 American independent road drama film directed by Dennis Hopper. I was extremely disappointed with this cult classic. Apart from the charismatic performance by Nicholson, there is little here of interest. The poor performances and editing certainly don't help. Although most of the songs are good to listen too, there are far too many for the minimal dialogue and lack of narrative. It may be considered a culturally significant film, but it is not entertaining viewing. Considered to be one of the greatest films of all time. 1001