Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed Reviews

  • Jun 13, 2017

    Very entertaining with plot that focuses of the excellent Cushing as the mad doctor. The monster is surprisingly normal which is interesting as he visits his wife. Plot driven from the first scene and /cushing proves his worth in the difficult role.

    Very entertaining with plot that focuses of the excellent Cushing as the mad doctor. The monster is surprisingly normal which is interesting as he visits his wife. Plot driven from the first scene and /cushing proves his worth in the difficult role.

  • Nov 12, 2016

    Okay Hammer Horror picture about the evil Baron Frankenstein, Peter Cushing, trying to resurrect the dead again. This time he's putting the brain of his brilliant doctor friend into a dead man's body. Things do go not as planned. Like most Hammer pictures of the time, there is lots of blood and heaving bosoms. This film does have one unfortunate rape scene included that was added to the film in post production over the objections of the director and actors by the producers who felt the film needed more sex. It's an unpleasant scene and then is never brought up again in the film, so it absolutely makes to sense. Freddie Jones also appears in the film. There is also a fine score by James Bernard, but overall, this is a weaker Hammer Horror picture. I read several reviews saying how this was the best in the Hammer Frankenstein films, but now that I think about it, I I much preferred some of the prior films over this one. Watch the gonzo "Frankenstein's Army" for a much cooler reboot of the old Mary Shelly story.

    Okay Hammer Horror picture about the evil Baron Frankenstein, Peter Cushing, trying to resurrect the dead again. This time he's putting the brain of his brilliant doctor friend into a dead man's body. Things do go not as planned. Like most Hammer pictures of the time, there is lots of blood and heaving bosoms. This film does have one unfortunate rape scene included that was added to the film in post production over the objections of the director and actors by the producers who felt the film needed more sex. It's an unpleasant scene and then is never brought up again in the film, so it absolutely makes to sense. Freddie Jones also appears in the film. There is also a fine score by James Bernard, but overall, this is a weaker Hammer Horror picture. I read several reviews saying how this was the best in the Hammer Frankenstein films, but now that I think about it, I I much preferred some of the prior films over this one. Watch the gonzo "Frankenstein's Army" for a much cooler reboot of the old Mary Shelly story.

  • Sep 03, 2016

    Cushing's Baron is completely unsympathetic in this film. He's lost whatever humanity he might have once had. His further descent into debauchery and madness is the selling point though. We don't need much of a monster in this one; Frankenstein himself is the monster this time.

    Cushing's Baron is completely unsympathetic in this film. He's lost whatever humanity he might have once had. His further descent into debauchery and madness is the selling point though. We don't need much of a monster in this one; Frankenstein himself is the monster this time.

  • Dec 04, 2015

    Madness is always sad. Baron Von Frankenstein has found a new inn to practice his methods and hijacks a young doctor and his fiancée to help him with his experiments. Together they kidnap a deranged young man and begin their dastardly efforts. "I'm sorry but stupidity always brings the worst from me." Terence Fisher, director of Horror of Dracula, The Curse of Frankenstein, The Mummy, Dracula: Prince of Darkness, The Gorgon, and The Curse of the Werewolf, delivers Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed. The storyline for this picture is fun and has a great classic horror feel and presence. The acting is excellent and the cast includes Peter Cushing, Veronica Carlson, Freddie Jones, and Simon Ward. "Your medical education is about to vastly improve." I came across this on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) this past Halloween and had to DVR it. I adore the classic horror genre and found Cushing to be delightful in this film. The film doesn't have a ton of horror elements and relies on the interesting and intense characters. This is worth viewing once for fans of classic horror pictures. "It was you who drove him out of his mind." Grade: C+

    Madness is always sad. Baron Von Frankenstein has found a new inn to practice his methods and hijacks a young doctor and his fiancée to help him with his experiments. Together they kidnap a deranged young man and begin their dastardly efforts. "I'm sorry but stupidity always brings the worst from me." Terence Fisher, director of Horror of Dracula, The Curse of Frankenstein, The Mummy, Dracula: Prince of Darkness, The Gorgon, and The Curse of the Werewolf, delivers Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed. The storyline for this picture is fun and has a great classic horror feel and presence. The acting is excellent and the cast includes Peter Cushing, Veronica Carlson, Freddie Jones, and Simon Ward. "Your medical education is about to vastly improve." I came across this on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) this past Halloween and had to DVR it. I adore the classic horror genre and found Cushing to be delightful in this film. The film doesn't have a ton of horror elements and relies on the interesting and intense characters. This is worth viewing once for fans of classic horror pictures. "It was you who drove him out of his mind." Grade: C+

  • Oct 02, 2015

    A pretty bad entry in the Hammer series of Frankenstein films. Cushing returns, and this time he is more evil than ever before,even randomly raping a woman which has no true setup and is never mentioned again after it happens. The movie just feels like been there done that, with extra gruesome sound effects and a rape scene to up the horror of it all, it just didn't work for the most part...until the Baron's creation this time is finally is brought to life and exacts revenge on Frankenstein it switches between boring and pointless.

    A pretty bad entry in the Hammer series of Frankenstein films. Cushing returns, and this time he is more evil than ever before,even randomly raping a woman which has no true setup and is never mentioned again after it happens. The movie just feels like been there done that, with extra gruesome sound effects and a rape scene to up the horror of it all, it just didn't work for the most part...until the Baron's creation this time is finally is brought to life and exacts revenge on Frankenstein it switches between boring and pointless.

  • May 15, 2015

    Another decent Frankenstein story, it's just isn't the most refreshing. Thrilling, but it has a long run-time compared to the other Hammer 'stein films and the pacing is pretty slow. Frankenstein gets pushed from being anti-hero to villain which works to some effect but hurts the character. Some good concepts, while also having a satisfactory ending.

    Another decent Frankenstein story, it's just isn't the most refreshing. Thrilling, but it has a long run-time compared to the other Hammer 'stein films and the pacing is pretty slow. Frankenstein gets pushed from being anti-hero to villain which works to some effect but hurts the character. Some good concepts, while also having a satisfactory ending.

  • Nov 12, 2014

    franchise grinds 2 a stop here.

    franchise grinds 2 a stop here.

  • Oct 22, 2014

    Hammer's first Frankenstein picture already played fast and loose with Mary Shelley's source material, but several sequels on, it's amazing to see how far apart the two stories (and particularly the title character) have diverged. Foregoing the return of the original Creature (as was tradition for Universal's various "Frankenstein" sequels), Cushing-- in top form-- is the returning element each time, delving into some new forbidden science and defying nature (and moral good sense) in the process. He's a monster through and through, although "Destroyed" benefits greatly from a solid helping of sardonic, biting wit from the mad Doctor that elevates it from the sometimes-stuffy period drama feel of "The Curse of Frankenstein." The story is severely marred, though, by a completely out-of-place rape scene included at the behest of Hammer executives, seemingly out of some misguided need to be "edgy" or "provocative." There's no repercussions or effect on the characters, it's not mentioned or referenced, and it was included against the wishes of director Terrence Fisher and both actors involved in the scene. It provides shock value and nothing more. Things sort of fall apart a bit in the end, with the final act feeling heavy on incident but light on meaning or motivation but all in all, this it's exciting, scary stuff in the grand Hammer tradition.

    Hammer's first Frankenstein picture already played fast and loose with Mary Shelley's source material, but several sequels on, it's amazing to see how far apart the two stories (and particularly the title character) have diverged. Foregoing the return of the original Creature (as was tradition for Universal's various "Frankenstein" sequels), Cushing-- in top form-- is the returning element each time, delving into some new forbidden science and defying nature (and moral good sense) in the process. He's a monster through and through, although "Destroyed" benefits greatly from a solid helping of sardonic, biting wit from the mad Doctor that elevates it from the sometimes-stuffy period drama feel of "The Curse of Frankenstein." The story is severely marred, though, by a completely out-of-place rape scene included at the behest of Hammer executives, seemingly out of some misguided need to be "edgy" or "provocative." There's no repercussions or effect on the characters, it's not mentioned or referenced, and it was included against the wishes of director Terrence Fisher and both actors involved in the scene. It provides shock value and nothing more. Things sort of fall apart a bit in the end, with the final act feeling heavy on incident but light on meaning or motivation but all in all, this it's exciting, scary stuff in the grand Hammer tradition.

  • Aug 02, 2013

    The best entry to the Hammer Frankenstein series besides The Curse of Frankenstein.

    The best entry to the Hammer Frankenstein series besides The Curse of Frankenstein.

  • Feb 01, 2013

    Baron Frankenstein has taken up shop in a small boarding house in England after being driven out of his homeland, where he proceeds to blackmail a promising young medical student into helping him with his diabolical designs. Frankenstein hopes to transplant the brain of an old colleague, Dr. Brandt, into a fresh new body to clear his mind of the debilitating disease which has driven him mad so that he may steal Brandt's secrets, but the revived doctor will have no part in Frankenstein's evil plan! Terence Fisher turns out another Gothic masterpiece in FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED, the fifth installment from Hammer's thrilling horror series! Here, the baron takes a sinister turn for the worst under the controlled guidance of Peter Cushing, who gives his best performance in the series. It is this vile take on the character for which he is most often remembered. Cushing is given strong support by Simon Ward as his unwilling apprentice and especially by Freddie Jones as the unfortunate Dr. Brandt. The scene in which the recently revived Brandt is rejected by his horrified widow strikes a devastating blow to the viewer's emotion. As always, Fisher delivers many artful touches along the way, despite the smaller production. It all ends in a fiery finale, which should have served as a fitting end for our wayward doctor before the series could begin to fall into decline. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED is in top contention with FRANKENSTEIN CREATED WOMAN as being the strongest sequel in the series, and one of Hammer's finest films. -Carl Manes I Like Horror Movies

    Baron Frankenstein has taken up shop in a small boarding house in England after being driven out of his homeland, where he proceeds to blackmail a promising young medical student into helping him with his diabolical designs. Frankenstein hopes to transplant the brain of an old colleague, Dr. Brandt, into a fresh new body to clear his mind of the debilitating disease which has driven him mad so that he may steal Brandt's secrets, but the revived doctor will have no part in Frankenstein's evil plan! Terence Fisher turns out another Gothic masterpiece in FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED, the fifth installment from Hammer's thrilling horror series! Here, the baron takes a sinister turn for the worst under the controlled guidance of Peter Cushing, who gives his best performance in the series. It is this vile take on the character for which he is most often remembered. Cushing is given strong support by Simon Ward as his unwilling apprentice and especially by Freddie Jones as the unfortunate Dr. Brandt. The scene in which the recently revived Brandt is rejected by his horrified widow strikes a devastating blow to the viewer's emotion. As always, Fisher delivers many artful touches along the way, despite the smaller production. It all ends in a fiery finale, which should have served as a fitting end for our wayward doctor before the series could begin to fall into decline. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED is in top contention with FRANKENSTEIN CREATED WOMAN as being the strongest sequel in the series, and one of Hammer's finest films. -Carl Manes I Like Horror Movies