Goodbye Christopher Robin Reviews

  • Chris
    Oct 07, 2019

    A must see for any Winnie the Pooh fan.

    A must see for any Winnie the Pooh fan.

  • Jun 23, 2019

    Seriously terrible film. Was all over the play and fit way too much into the first 30 minutes. I was so confused that I never made it to the Winnie the Pooh connection.

    Seriously terrible film. Was all over the play and fit way too much into the first 30 minutes. I was so confused that I never made it to the Winnie the Pooh connection.

  • Feb 24, 2019

    Loved this movie, cinematography, acting and script!

    Loved this movie, cinematography, acting and script!

  • Feb 11, 2019

    "Goodbye Christopher Robin" gives audiences a deeper, more inclusive peek behind the curtain of A. A. Milne's complicated relationship with his son, but it gets twisted between explaining the power of make-believe, losing your childhood innocence, and the physical and mental scars of PTSD. In the end of this PG biopic, we're led to believe that the success of Winnie the Pooh caused the real Christopher Robin a lot of pain and we're to blame.

    "Goodbye Christopher Robin" gives audiences a deeper, more inclusive peek behind the curtain of A. A. Milne's complicated relationship with his son, but it gets twisted between explaining the power of make-believe, losing your childhood innocence, and the physical and mental scars of PTSD. In the end of this PG biopic, we're led to believe that the success of Winnie the Pooh caused the real Christopher Robin a lot of pain and we're to blame.

  • Jan 15, 2019

    A very interesting tale of A.A.Milne the creator of Winnie the Pooh. After a very slow opening act the film finally picks up the pace pulling on the emotional strings and telling relationship between father and son. Young Christopher Robin steals the show with his performance.

    A very interesting tale of A.A.Milne the creator of Winnie the Pooh. After a very slow opening act the film finally picks up the pace pulling on the emotional strings and telling relationship between father and son. Young Christopher Robin steals the show with his performance.

  • Jan 06, 2019

    This is not an accurate depiction of Christopher Milne's childhood. The movie takes bits and pieces of his autobiography "The Enchanted Places" but grossly distorts the characters. If you read the book, you will be disappointed by the movie-makers depiction of the mother and father. They were much better parents and Christopher's childhood was not the borderline child abuse that is shown in the movie. One interesting and significant departure is the fact that the imaginary world of Winnie the Pooh and the hundred acre woods was created by Christopher and his mother. The mother then conveyed the stories to the father as he wrote the books. Also, although the father was in WW1 and it is safe to assume that it was an awful experience, there is no mention by Christopher Milne of any of the PTSD incidents that are a major part of the movie. Christopher Milne does say that he grew to dislike Christopher Robin during his boarding school years because of bullying. However, he says that he doesn't think his father ever knew anything about it and he loved it as a child. Anyway, people are free to read the book for themselves. I just wanted to post this because there were so many reviews where people were troubled by the movie as if it was a true story.

    This is not an accurate depiction of Christopher Milne's childhood. The movie takes bits and pieces of his autobiography "The Enchanted Places" but grossly distorts the characters. If you read the book, you will be disappointed by the movie-makers depiction of the mother and father. They were much better parents and Christopher's childhood was not the borderline child abuse that is shown in the movie. One interesting and significant departure is the fact that the imaginary world of Winnie the Pooh and the hundred acre woods was created by Christopher and his mother. The mother then conveyed the stories to the father as he wrote the books. Also, although the father was in WW1 and it is safe to assume that it was an awful experience, there is no mention by Christopher Milne of any of the PTSD incidents that are a major part of the movie. Christopher Milne does say that he grew to dislike Christopher Robin during his boarding school years because of bullying. However, he says that he doesn't think his father ever knew anything about it and he loved it as a child. Anyway, people are free to read the book for themselves. I just wanted to post this because there were so many reviews where people were troubled by the movie as if it was a true story.

  • Jan 04, 2019

    Sweet, short, and lovely

    Sweet, short, and lovely

  • Dec 30, 2018

    Goodbye Christopher Robin is a fantastic film. It is about the relationship between writer AA Milne and his son, Christopher Robin. Domhnall Gleeson and Margot Robbie give excellent performances. The script is well written. Simon Curtis did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama. Goodbye Christopher Robin is a must see.

    Goodbye Christopher Robin is a fantastic film. It is about the relationship between writer AA Milne and his son, Christopher Robin. Domhnall Gleeson and Margot Robbie give excellent performances. The script is well written. Simon Curtis did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama. Goodbye Christopher Robin is a must see.

  • Nov 21, 2018

    The real story behind the phenomenon. A bit sad, but eye-opening at the same time. Much better than another Hollywood smooth-over

    The real story behind the phenomenon. A bit sad, but eye-opening at the same time. Much better than another Hollywood smooth-over

  • Nov 17, 2018

    It is a classy piece of work - with some thoughtful bits - but a lot of the conflict being portrayed seems very trumped up. Much ado about nothing. Like the big deal that is made about the child having to do public appearances as Christopher Robin really seems like it could and should have been a whole lot less angsty. Seems like a 20 second talk could have straightened it out. And then later he's mad because, although his dad spent lots of time with him for a period, dad had a slightly different focus at times than the kid imagined. Cry me a river. However, there is a niceness at the core of it all, and I have to go slight thumbs up. 5.4 out of 10.

    It is a classy piece of work - with some thoughtful bits - but a lot of the conflict being portrayed seems very trumped up. Much ado about nothing. Like the big deal that is made about the child having to do public appearances as Christopher Robin really seems like it could and should have been a whole lot less angsty. Seems like a 20 second talk could have straightened it out. And then later he's mad because, although his dad spent lots of time with him for a period, dad had a slightly different focus at times than the kid imagined. Cry me a river. However, there is a niceness at the core of it all, and I have to go slight thumbs up. 5.4 out of 10.