Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas Reviews

  • Nov 16, 2020

    no, just no, if you have the curiosity to see this film know that it will be a waste of time.

    no, just no, if you have the curiosity to see this film know that it will be a waste of time.

  • Sep 07, 2020

    Cameron doing the worm as part of a Christmas dance sequence is really all this movie has going for it. I have already wasted too much time on this review...

    Cameron doing the worm as part of a Christmas dance sequence is really all this movie has going for it. I have already wasted too much time on this review...

  • Jul 23, 2020

    If you looked at the poster of Saving Christmas and expected a fun family action comedy featuring the actor from "Growing Pains," get ready to be disappointed. Kirk Cameron, the formerly popular teen actor turned born-again Christian, is off to save Christmas and what does he do? He stalls inside a car with his brother-in-law Christian (Darren Doane) and lectures to him and the audience about the true meaning of Christmas and the birth of Jesus. Saving Christmas is more about inflating Cameron's ego than spreading the holiday cheer to all your friends. Despite being a Christian, Cameron contradicts his own religious philosophy of love and forgiveness and suggests that Saint Nicholas, the originator of Santa Claus, murdered heretics when not giving presents. I guess Cameron was trying to be ironic with his "Lord of the Ringsy" take on the figure, but instead it comes off as mean-spirited, especially in a Christmas movie. To be fair, the joke might have worked in a tongue-and-cheek sense, if the other characters weren't so poorly-written. Christian is a one-dimensional Scrooge in the mud, the atheist conspirators contribute nothing and neither do any of the party-goers, including Kirk's sister Bridgette, except a dance number. Seeing the characters' lack of onscreen presence only adds to Kirk Cameron's overlong sanctimonious preachiness; that's me a film lover in general. If Kirk Cameron is reading this post (I seriously doubt that he is), I apologize for being a "hater and atheist," but Saving Christmas wasn't very good. (1 Hot Cocoa in a Mike Seaver Mug out of 5)

    If you looked at the poster of Saving Christmas and expected a fun family action comedy featuring the actor from "Growing Pains," get ready to be disappointed. Kirk Cameron, the formerly popular teen actor turned born-again Christian, is off to save Christmas and what does he do? He stalls inside a car with his brother-in-law Christian (Darren Doane) and lectures to him and the audience about the true meaning of Christmas and the birth of Jesus. Saving Christmas is more about inflating Cameron's ego than spreading the holiday cheer to all your friends. Despite being a Christian, Cameron contradicts his own religious philosophy of love and forgiveness and suggests that Saint Nicholas, the originator of Santa Claus, murdered heretics when not giving presents. I guess Cameron was trying to be ironic with his "Lord of the Ringsy" take on the figure, but instead it comes off as mean-spirited, especially in a Christmas movie. To be fair, the joke might have worked in a tongue-and-cheek sense, if the other characters weren't so poorly-written. Christian is a one-dimensional Scrooge in the mud, the atheist conspirators contribute nothing and neither do any of the party-goers, including Kirk's sister Bridgette, except a dance number. Seeing the characters' lack of onscreen presence only adds to Kirk Cameron's overlong sanctimonious preachiness; that's me a film lover in general. If Kirk Cameron is reading this post (I seriously doubt that he is), I apologize for being a "hater and atheist," but Saving Christmas wasn't very good. (1 Hot Cocoa in a Mike Seaver Mug out of 5)

  • Jul 19, 2020

    Ironically, after viewing this movie, I am absolutely certain that there is no God. It's a sloppy, heavy-handed mess that is a waste of literally everyone's time.

    Ironically, after viewing this movie, I am absolutely certain that there is no God. It's a sloppy, heavy-handed mess that is a waste of literally everyone's time.

  • May 16, 2020

    This absolute chimpanzee-dropping of a movie is yet another example of Kirk Cameron attempting to trade on his fame (which, let's face it, even in its heyday was pretty mid-list at best) in order to proselytize his buffet-style Christianity by attempting to assuage the guilt of a predominately white, upper-middle class, conservative Christian audience through the message that Christmas is a time of year to shamelessly revel in their myopic heartlessness through empty, conspicuous consumption. 'Prosperity Gospel' is based upon the idea that its simple enough to identify God's 'Chosen People'. They live in the biggest houses, driving the most expensive cars, married to the hottest, most submissive trophy wives (procured through the best cosmetic surgery money can buy), and able to furnish their vapid, empty, soulless children with the most resplendent Christmas imaginable (all of this, even in the faces of families who cannot afford the most basic food or shelter). 'Prosperity Gospel' promulgates the message that, rather than feel bad about poor little Johnny whose parents can't even buy him breakfast from McDonalds because there isn't enough change to be found under the seats of the car they've been living in for 4 months, those who can afford to flaunt their wealth in the faces of poor Johnny and his desperate parents should do so shamelessly, because that's how true Christians show their gratitude to a 'God' who has singled them out for prosperity and good fortune. In the Gospel according to Kirk, it is the duty of every prosperous Christian to display their obscene and likely ill-gotten wealth, in order to throw into starker relief the disparity between rich and poor, and thereby draw a clear distinction between 'Good' and 'Bad'. In the Gospel according to Kirk, 'God' rewards 'The Faithful' with prosperity, and any attempt to redress that imbalance through charity is an act that contravenes the dictates of 'God', by 'artificially' elevating those who do not enjoy 'God's' favor to the level of those who do. It is also the duty of every 'God'-fearing Christian to worship their benefactor with displays of conspicuous wealth, especially at Christmas. Kirk Cameron's 'God' is the god of heartless consumerism justified through predetermination millennialism, a philosophy which states that, from the moment of birth, one's path through life is pre-ordained by 'God', and therefore any attempt to change that path through human agency is not only pointless, but is in fact sinful, as charity toward the impoverished and deprived both denies 'God's' ultimate design for each and every human being, and blurs the lines of distinction between those who enjoy 'God's' favor and those who suffer 'His' displeasure. KC's 'Screw-You-Jack-I-Got-Mine' brand of Christianity is emblematic of American consumerist exceptionalism which has its roots in European and Early American 18th-century so-called 'humanist enlightenment' philosophy and political thinking. Adherents of which who, while simultaneously pushing back against aristocratic 'Divine Right' were, themselves, wealthy land-and-slave-owning businessmen who saw their own prosperity as an act of 'divine providence', and therefore to be enjoyed and reveled in without thought to others. The Founding Fathers were shamelessly hypocritical in that way, so I suppose KC can wrap himself in the flag and say he's just following their example with this big, steaming turd of a movie.

    This absolute chimpanzee-dropping of a movie is yet another example of Kirk Cameron attempting to trade on his fame (which, let's face it, even in its heyday was pretty mid-list at best) in order to proselytize his buffet-style Christianity by attempting to assuage the guilt of a predominately white, upper-middle class, conservative Christian audience through the message that Christmas is a time of year to shamelessly revel in their myopic heartlessness through empty, conspicuous consumption. 'Prosperity Gospel' is based upon the idea that its simple enough to identify God's 'Chosen People'. They live in the biggest houses, driving the most expensive cars, married to the hottest, most submissive trophy wives (procured through the best cosmetic surgery money can buy), and able to furnish their vapid, empty, soulless children with the most resplendent Christmas imaginable (all of this, even in the faces of families who cannot afford the most basic food or shelter). 'Prosperity Gospel' promulgates the message that, rather than feel bad about poor little Johnny whose parents can't even buy him breakfast from McDonalds because there isn't enough change to be found under the seats of the car they've been living in for 4 months, those who can afford to flaunt their wealth in the faces of poor Johnny and his desperate parents should do so shamelessly, because that's how true Christians show their gratitude to a 'God' who has singled them out for prosperity and good fortune. In the Gospel according to Kirk, it is the duty of every prosperous Christian to display their obscene and likely ill-gotten wealth, in order to throw into starker relief the disparity between rich and poor, and thereby draw a clear distinction between 'Good' and 'Bad'. In the Gospel according to Kirk, 'God' rewards 'The Faithful' with prosperity, and any attempt to redress that imbalance through charity is an act that contravenes the dictates of 'God', by 'artificially' elevating those who do not enjoy 'God's' favor to the level of those who do. It is also the duty of every 'God'-fearing Christian to worship their benefactor with displays of conspicuous wealth, especially at Christmas. Kirk Cameron's 'God' is the god of heartless consumerism justified through predetermination millennialism, a philosophy which states that, from the moment of birth, one's path through life is pre-ordained by 'God', and therefore any attempt to change that path through human agency is not only pointless, but is in fact sinful, as charity toward the impoverished and deprived both denies 'God's' ultimate design for each and every human being, and blurs the lines of distinction between those who enjoy 'God's' favor and those who suffer 'His' displeasure. KC's 'Screw-You-Jack-I-Got-Mine' brand of Christianity is emblematic of American consumerist exceptionalism which has its roots in European and Early American 18th-century so-called 'humanist enlightenment' philosophy and political thinking. Adherents of which who, while simultaneously pushing back against aristocratic 'Divine Right' were, themselves, wealthy land-and-slave-owning businessmen who saw their own prosperity as an act of 'divine providence', and therefore to be enjoyed and reveled in without thought to others. The Founding Fathers were shamelessly hypocritical in that way, so I suppose KC can wrap himself in the flag and say he's just following their example with this big, steaming turd of a movie.

  • Jan 02, 2020

    This movie proves that a loving god does not exist. We all know that look that only crazy Christians like Michelle Bachman have in their eyes. It's like their brains were removed. The empty void was filled with this movie.

    This movie proves that a loving god does not exist. We all know that look that only crazy Christians like Michelle Bachman have in their eyes. It's like their brains were removed. The empty void was filled with this movie.

  • Jan 02, 2020

    This movie was great! I am not one to watch movies, but this film fits the bill! It explained in a way that I couldn't have the real joys of the holiday season. I dealt with two family members this year that have a negative outlook on Christmas and I am going to encourage them to watch this. There is enough negativity in this world without looking for it on a holiday that is supposed to be joyful. If one looks for the negative, they're sure to find an abundance, but if you put on a fresh pair of lenses and see things from a different perspective, you're likely to find the positive. I loved this and will be adding it to the collection of movies I don't have yet. :)

    This movie was great! I am not one to watch movies, but this film fits the bill! It explained in a way that I couldn't have the real joys of the holiday season. I dealt with two family members this year that have a negative outlook on Christmas and I am going to encourage them to watch this. There is enough negativity in this world without looking for it on a holiday that is supposed to be joyful. If one looks for the negative, they're sure to find an abundance, but if you put on a fresh pair of lenses and see things from a different perspective, you're likely to find the positive. I loved this and will be adding it to the collection of movies I don't have yet. :)

  • Dec 28, 2019

    One of the worst movies I've ever seen, its morals and false propaganda is enough to make you think that The Room is better.

    One of the worst movies I've ever seen, its morals and false propaganda is enough to make you think that The Room is better.

  • Dec 12, 2019

    Wow, are you serious Cameron??? Santa was a "bad ass dude who beat people up for not believing in Jesus enough." You have lost your damn mind! Everyone involved in this "film" should be mortified. It felt like I was watching a poorly produced Christmas version of the Cube, where everyone goes insane and there is no escape. Death inevitably ensues. Not sure if Cameron is actually a Christian or a troll on a mission to make Christians look so bad he single-handedly destroys the religion altogether. You're doing a bang up job of that Cameron. I'm ashamed I ever had a crush on you when I was a teen.

    Wow, are you serious Cameron??? Santa was a "bad ass dude who beat people up for not believing in Jesus enough." You have lost your damn mind! Everyone involved in this "film" should be mortified. It felt like I was watching a poorly produced Christmas version of the Cube, where everyone goes insane and there is no escape. Death inevitably ensues. Not sure if Cameron is actually a Christian or a troll on a mission to make Christians look so bad he single-handedly destroys the religion altogether. You're doing a bang up job of that Cameron. I'm ashamed I ever had a crush on you when I was a teen.

  • Dec 03, 2019

    No 0 star option? Or negative stars perhaps? This was the most poorly conceived and put together madhouse of a "film" I've ever seen. Basically 60 minutes of actual movie and the rest is dance and Kirk Cameron doing "The Worm". So stunned by this and by the prosperity gospel message and just the overall lack of.. Well, anything! Kirk Cameron is a weirdo.. Jesus lover who follows none of the love lessons of Christ. What a misguided nut... And to sum it up... "use your richest butter". That says it all

    No 0 star option? Or negative stars perhaps? This was the most poorly conceived and put together madhouse of a "film" I've ever seen. Basically 60 minutes of actual movie and the rest is dance and Kirk Cameron doing "The Worm". So stunned by this and by the prosperity gospel message and just the overall lack of.. Well, anything! Kirk Cameron is a weirdo.. Jesus lover who follows none of the love lessons of Christ. What a misguided nut... And to sum it up... "use your richest butter". That says it all