Kundun Reviews

  • Mar 04, 2019

    L'originalita' del tema e delle ambientazioni rappresenta l'elemento piu' interessante del film, che dimostra la grande versatilita' stilistica di questo grande regista. Anche se cerca di mantenere una percezione neutra e tradizionale, non mancano i suoi tocchi registici, movimenti di camera precisi e ben studiati, musiche perfette accompagnate da splendidi immagini e uno stile generale perfettamente coerente con il resto della sua filmografia. Dal film emerge un interesse molto profondo per il valore della religione ed il delicato rapporto tra realta' e credenza, un tema importante, reso e trasmesso con intelligenza e sensibilita'.

    L'originalita' del tema e delle ambientazioni rappresenta l'elemento piu' interessante del film, che dimostra la grande versatilita' stilistica di questo grande regista. Anche se cerca di mantenere una percezione neutra e tradizionale, non mancano i suoi tocchi registici, movimenti di camera precisi e ben studiati, musiche perfette accompagnate da splendidi immagini e uno stile generale perfettamente coerente con il resto della sua filmografia. Dal film emerge un interesse molto profondo per il valore della religione ed il delicato rapporto tra realta' e credenza, un tema importante, reso e trasmesso con intelligenza e sensibilita'.

  • Jan 15, 2019

    ): Kundun is director Martin Scorsese's take on the Dalai Lama- the second film on a similar subject in the same year(the other being Brad Pitt starrer Seven Years in Tibet) and neither films are what one would call great films. Kundun is sadly lacking in a number of important areas: passion, energy, and drama, to name a few. And, while Kundun boasts impressive cinematography (by Roger Deakins) and an effective score (by Philip Glass), the images and music aren't enough to hide the picture's essential hollowness. Having said this the cinematography is breathtaking and some scenes are awe inspiring. One scene in particular stands out- In it, the Dalai Lama is having a nightmare about the growing death toll in Tibet as a result of the Chinese invasion. The camera pulls back to show him standing amidst a sea of his dead, red-robed countrymen -- the very people he has promised to protect. It is a powerful, provocative image -- but too little of Kundun reaches this level of mastery. All in all this is a fascinating film and Scorsese fans should definitely check it out.

    ): Kundun is director Martin Scorsese's take on the Dalai Lama- the second film on a similar subject in the same year(the other being Brad Pitt starrer Seven Years in Tibet) and neither films are what one would call great films. Kundun is sadly lacking in a number of important areas: passion, energy, and drama, to name a few. And, while Kundun boasts impressive cinematography (by Roger Deakins) and an effective score (by Philip Glass), the images and music aren't enough to hide the picture's essential hollowness. Having said this the cinematography is breathtaking and some scenes are awe inspiring. One scene in particular stands out- In it, the Dalai Lama is having a nightmare about the growing death toll in Tibet as a result of the Chinese invasion. The camera pulls back to show him standing amidst a sea of his dead, red-robed countrymen -- the very people he has promised to protect. It is a powerful, provocative image -- but too little of Kundun reaches this level of mastery. All in all this is a fascinating film and Scorsese fans should definitely check it out.

  • May 11, 2017

    Kundun is about as straightforward a film as you can imagine. It recounts the history of the Dalai Lama from toddler to adulthood. It’s almost like watching a history lesson, but not one with action or big moments, more like literally watching someone lecture in a history class. The problem is most of the events happen off-camera and are relayed through advisers and confidants. I thought seeing how this child grows up with all these expectations was interesting, and the young actors were all great. The movie fully embraces the Buddhist belief that this child is Kundun reincarnated, because they have more than a few moments where he proves it. I thought it would have been more interesting if they had sown doubt into the audience, so that we were questioning whether he was actually suited to his position of leadership, but they went the other way. Therefore, when there is a scene where we see the Dalai Lama questioning whether he’s fit for the position, it feels false or hollow because I’ve been so completely assured he is this person. The history lesson is useful, even if it is drawn out and not all that exciting in the way it was portrayed. I definitely appreciated what the film was trying to do, and it made me instantly go to the internet in order to do more research on the Dalai Lama, but it is not something I’ll watch again.

    Kundun is about as straightforward a film as you can imagine. It recounts the history of the Dalai Lama from toddler to adulthood. It’s almost like watching a history lesson, but not one with action or big moments, more like literally watching someone lecture in a history class. The problem is most of the events happen off-camera and are relayed through advisers and confidants. I thought seeing how this child grows up with all these expectations was interesting, and the young actors were all great. The movie fully embraces the Buddhist belief that this child is Kundun reincarnated, because they have more than a few moments where he proves it. I thought it would have been more interesting if they had sown doubt into the audience, so that we were questioning whether he was actually suited to his position of leadership, but they went the other way. Therefore, when there is a scene where we see the Dalai Lama questioning whether he’s fit for the position, it feels false or hollow because I’ve been so completely assured he is this person. The history lesson is useful, even if it is drawn out and not all that exciting in the way it was portrayed. I definitely appreciated what the film was trying to do, and it made me instantly go to the internet in order to do more research on the Dalai Lama, but it is not something I’ll watch again.

  • Apr 09, 2017

    Kundun is a very interesting and informative movie about the fourteenth Dalai Lama. This movie does a great job of taking us through the early days in the life of Kundun, the God king of Tibet - before he was banished into India at the young age of twenty four. Martin Scorsese's does a great job of showing the struggles of the Dalai Lama against a communist China. I thought that the chanting and rituals of fortune-telling were depicted very well and showed how in Tibet, the people of the city submissively got down on their hands and knees to bow to Kundun as they awaited his blessing. It really showed how they looked to him as their savior, the movie really made me feel that he gave them a lot of the hope and peace that they were seeking. Even though in the film he came across more as just a normal man and not necessarily a God, it is apparent that he is a really special person. Kundun, who is believed to be a reincarnation of Buddha, actually shows that while growing up, he also was subject to learning more as the teachers corrected and educated him. He is shown in the movie as a quiet, humble and gentle man who loves unconditionally. This film relates to world religion by giving a detailed view to those curious about Tibetan Buddhism. It is very enlightening and gives a breakdown of the Chinese invasion and the thoughts of the Dalai Lama. This movie helped relate a lot of the reading that I have studied about Buddhism over the past few months and is a memorable film. Overall I think that this movie did a great job of showing how Dalai Lamas are selected, the life and journey of Kundun and his time in Tibet before it was harshly taken over by China.

    Kundun is a very interesting and informative movie about the fourteenth Dalai Lama. This movie does a great job of taking us through the early days in the life of Kundun, the God king of Tibet - before he was banished into India at the young age of twenty four. Martin Scorsese's does a great job of showing the struggles of the Dalai Lama against a communist China. I thought that the chanting and rituals of fortune-telling were depicted very well and showed how in Tibet, the people of the city submissively got down on their hands and knees to bow to Kundun as they awaited his blessing. It really showed how they looked to him as their savior, the movie really made me feel that he gave them a lot of the hope and peace that they were seeking. Even though in the film he came across more as just a normal man and not necessarily a God, it is apparent that he is a really special person. Kundun, who is believed to be a reincarnation of Buddha, actually shows that while growing up, he also was subject to learning more as the teachers corrected and educated him. He is shown in the movie as a quiet, humble and gentle man who loves unconditionally. This film relates to world religion by giving a detailed view to those curious about Tibetan Buddhism. It is very enlightening and gives a breakdown of the Chinese invasion and the thoughts of the Dalai Lama. This movie helped relate a lot of the reading that I have studied about Buddhism over the past few months and is a memorable film. Overall I think that this movie did a great job of showing how Dalai Lamas are selected, the life and journey of Kundun and his time in Tibet before it was harshly taken over by China.

  • Jan 20, 2017

    Kundun is about the thirteenth Dali Lama and is directed by Martin Scorsese. While this is certainly not Scorsese best and can feel on the long side with really not too much character development. It is still a interesting movie with a great score and amazing cinematography. This film shows that Scorsese can go out of his comfort zone and still make a good movie.

    Kundun is about the thirteenth Dali Lama and is directed by Martin Scorsese. While this is certainly not Scorsese best and can feel on the long side with really not too much character development. It is still a interesting movie with a great score and amazing cinematography. This film shows that Scorsese can go out of his comfort zone and still make a good movie.

  • Nov 12, 2016

    In Buddhism, a Dalai Lama which is the spiritual head of Buddhism in Tibet and the spiritual and temporal ruler of Tibet, is reincarnated into whatever bodies he chooses and is then put to a test to determine whether or not the person is the next Dalai Lama. The 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso, died in December 17, 1933. Four years later(in 1937), a young boy at the age of two years named Lhamo Dondrub was discovered with the taught that he would be the next reincarnation of the Buddha of compassion and was declared the 14th Dalai Lama. He was an average boy that was living in Tibet with his parents. As Tibetans believed that he might be the reincarnation of the Buddha of compassion, they made him leave his village Tibet which is located at the border of China and went to another place. They also called him "Kundun" which means the "ocean of wisdom". He was forced to leave his parents and being so young, he was scared but he managed until he grew up. The people that he stayed with were teaching more about the Buddhist because they all believed that he was the next Dalai Lama. The people that were taking care of him were also preparing for to becoming a leader. Tibet and China were starting to have issues with the government and he had to discuss the problem and find a solution because he was left to handle the issue by himself. Giving the power of a Buddha, he levered the concern with no one by his side and did not give up on his principles. He started to fast which was one way of Buddhist principle and avoid violence and the way to achieve enlightenment. Despite all the trouble that he had to encounter, he was successful and brought peace in the country.

    In Buddhism, a Dalai Lama which is the spiritual head of Buddhism in Tibet and the spiritual and temporal ruler of Tibet, is reincarnated into whatever bodies he chooses and is then put to a test to determine whether or not the person is the next Dalai Lama. The 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso, died in December 17, 1933. Four years later(in 1937), a young boy at the age of two years named Lhamo Dondrub was discovered with the taught that he would be the next reincarnation of the Buddha of compassion and was declared the 14th Dalai Lama. He was an average boy that was living in Tibet with his parents. As Tibetans believed that he might be the reincarnation of the Buddha of compassion, they made him leave his village Tibet which is located at the border of China and went to another place. They also called him "Kundun" which means the "ocean of wisdom". He was forced to leave his parents and being so young, he was scared but he managed until he grew up. The people that he stayed with were teaching more about the Buddhist because they all believed that he was the next Dalai Lama. The people that were taking care of him were also preparing for to becoming a leader. Tibet and China were starting to have issues with the government and he had to discuss the problem and find a solution because he was left to handle the issue by himself. Giving the power of a Buddha, he levered the concern with no one by his side and did not give up on his principles. He started to fast which was one way of Buddhist principle and avoid violence and the way to achieve enlightenment. Despite all the trouble that he had to encounter, he was successful and brought peace in the country.

  • Oct 28, 2016

    The story of the Dalai Lama, how he was found and the challenges he has faced for Tibet. Interesting story but a pretty slow film.

    The story of the Dalai Lama, how he was found and the challenges he has faced for Tibet. Interesting story but a pretty slow film.

  • Oct 07, 2016

    The movie, Kundun, starts out in a small village in Tibet. Here lives a Buddhist family with three children that are going about their daily life with a very demanding toddler. They get visitors that are Buddhist monks traveling and looking for a particular child. One of the monks notices how the youngest son of the family reacts when he sees the beads he is wearing. When given the test for the Dalia Lama, he chose all the correct items and is seen as the 14th Dalia Lama. The boy is taken to live with the monks so he can be trained to lead the people of Tibet. He grows up there with the monks while China increases pressure for Tibet to become part of China. One day, China decides to invade Tibet and enforce their rule over the people. The Dalia Lama has no choice but to flee Tibet, heading to India, on a very dangerous trip. He is exiled from Tibet to this day in fear that if he returns to Tibet he will killed. I think that the movie moved a little slow, though that could also be in part to the Buddhist belief in peace and calmness. Though it was slow to progress, it gave a good look at the life of the 14Th Dalia Lama and his struggle to keep the indemnity of Tibet. There were some interesting scenes, such as the sand mandala creation, the ritual ceremony in which Kundun's father was hacked into pieces and fed to vultures, and the point when the man who found the Dalia Lama was found dead in his jail cell. This movie reveals many of the key concepts of Buddhism. They make mention of the Four Noble Truths, the Buddhist belief that nothing is permanent, and the fact that in Buddhism, nobody is above being taught. Even though Kundun was seen as a spirit, he was still raised and taught by teachers. He wasn't all-knowing. Also, a ritual in the Buddhist religion that has particularly interested me this semester is that of sand mandalas. In Kundun, a giant sand mandala was constructed. When Kundun's father was chopped up, it was done as a sky burial, a common ritual. The movie relates to how the world religions are seen as holding progress of the world back. The Chinese leader thought that Buddhism was a plague on the people of Tibet and needed to be removed from the government of the country. The people of the world have become more intelligent and think that religion is outdated with no place in a modern society. As we become more advanced we have lost focus on the importance of the teachings that all religions have passed down through the generations. We now put our faith and trust in finding our own answers to the problems we face. The Chinese in the film were only concerned with expanding the empire and becoming the dominant country in the region. The Chinese leader felt that Buddhism was in the way of his conquest for power and the communist rule that he inspired.

    The movie, Kundun, starts out in a small village in Tibet. Here lives a Buddhist family with three children that are going about their daily life with a very demanding toddler. They get visitors that are Buddhist monks traveling and looking for a particular child. One of the monks notices how the youngest son of the family reacts when he sees the beads he is wearing. When given the test for the Dalia Lama, he chose all the correct items and is seen as the 14th Dalia Lama. The boy is taken to live with the monks so he can be trained to lead the people of Tibet. He grows up there with the monks while China increases pressure for Tibet to become part of China. One day, China decides to invade Tibet and enforce their rule over the people. The Dalia Lama has no choice but to flee Tibet, heading to India, on a very dangerous trip. He is exiled from Tibet to this day in fear that if he returns to Tibet he will killed. I think that the movie moved a little slow, though that could also be in part to the Buddhist belief in peace and calmness. Though it was slow to progress, it gave a good look at the life of the 14Th Dalia Lama and his struggle to keep the indemnity of Tibet. There were some interesting scenes, such as the sand mandala creation, the ritual ceremony in which Kundun's father was hacked into pieces and fed to vultures, and the point when the man who found the Dalia Lama was found dead in his jail cell. This movie reveals many of the key concepts of Buddhism. They make mention of the Four Noble Truths, the Buddhist belief that nothing is permanent, and the fact that in Buddhism, nobody is above being taught. Even though Kundun was seen as a spirit, he was still raised and taught by teachers. He wasn't all-knowing. Also, a ritual in the Buddhist religion that has particularly interested me this semester is that of sand mandalas. In Kundun, a giant sand mandala was constructed. When Kundun's father was chopped up, it was done as a sky burial, a common ritual. The movie relates to how the world religions are seen as holding progress of the world back. The Chinese leader thought that Buddhism was a plague on the people of Tibet and needed to be removed from the government of the country. The people of the world have become more intelligent and think that religion is outdated with no place in a modern society. As we become more advanced we have lost focus on the importance of the teachings that all religions have passed down through the generations. We now put our faith and trust in finding our own answers to the problems we face. The Chinese in the film were only concerned with expanding the empire and becoming the dominant country in the region. The Chinese leader felt that Buddhism was in the way of his conquest for power and the communist rule that he inspired.

  • Sep 05, 2016

    Excellent fascinating blend history and of Tibetan culture. I especially love the sand ritual woven into the film.

    Excellent fascinating blend history and of Tibetan culture. I especially love the sand ritual woven into the film.

  • Aug 27, 2016

    Highly watchable and certainly not boring, even if on the long side. Feels like it was intended to be more of a political statement than it turns out to be.

    Highly watchable and certainly not boring, even if on the long side. Feels like it was intended to be more of a political statement than it turns out to be.