Lambert & Stamp Reviews

  • Feb 14, 2017

    A film that had to be made to provide testament to 2 vanguard rock music managers. Ironically, they were focused on the cinema industry, but fate took them on a path in developing The Who, one of the greatest rock bands of all time. Loaded with interviews from the now aging key players from the original story, including Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and Chris Stamp himself, the film may contain a little too much information as it comes across as overly indulgent at times. After all, this isn't a documentary of The Who, but of their original managers. A little long at 120 minutes. It may have been better suited to having been edited down to 90 minutes, which would have curtailed some of the monotony, and likely have made the same impact.

    A film that had to be made to provide testament to 2 vanguard rock music managers. Ironically, they were focused on the cinema industry, but fate took them on a path in developing The Who, one of the greatest rock bands of all time. Loaded with interviews from the now aging key players from the original story, including Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and Chris Stamp himself, the film may contain a little too much information as it comes across as overly indulgent at times. After all, this isn't a documentary of The Who, but of their original managers. A little long at 120 minutes. It may have been better suited to having been edited down to 90 minutes, which would have curtailed some of the monotony, and likely have made the same impact.

  • Apr 01, 2016

    some amazing, high-quality concert footage of the band at their earliest, before they were called The Who. super engaging story about their managers/promoters.

    some amazing, high-quality concert footage of the band at their earliest, before they were called The Who. super engaging story about their managers/promoters.

  • Nov 20, 2015

    One of the most riveting documentary films I've ever seen this year.

    One of the most riveting documentary films I've ever seen this year.

  • Sep 28, 2015

    This documentary may have the most interesting back story of any that I have seen. Poignant, eye-opening, illustrative and sad. A must see for Who fans. Along with the chronicle of the band's career Chris Stamp provides a road map for finding and "creating" a Rock & Roll sensation!

    This documentary may have the most interesting back story of any that I have seen. Poignant, eye-opening, illustrative and sad. A must see for Who fans. Along with the chronicle of the band's career Chris Stamp provides a road map for finding and "creating" a Rock & Roll sensation!

  • Sep 07, 2015

    Loved this movie! If you are at all a fan of The Who, you will enjoy this behind the scenes documentary.

    Loved this movie! If you are at all a fan of The Who, you will enjoy this behind the scenes documentary.

  • Sep 06, 2015

    An entertaining documentary on The Who's early management duo. It could of wandered off and told countless tales of post gig debauchery but instead it stays focused and concentrates on the two main protagonists.

    An entertaining documentary on The Who's early management duo. It could of wandered off and told countless tales of post gig debauchery but instead it stays focused and concentrates on the two main protagonists.

  • Aug 29, 2015

    This is doc I wanted so badly to love. Stamp, Lambert and Townshend made musical history together, by constructing and working with the Who. Townshend, musical genius created there important works, Tommy, Lifehouse and Quadrophenia while Lambert and Stamp worked closely with him, although towards the end of their relationship, Lambert succumbed to Hollywood (the Tommy film) and then heroin. This film fails for me because we just gloss over Lambert's decline and death and proceeds to memorialize his memory. Lambert, the son of British a British composer and a prima ballerina, grew up in the world of high art. Brilliantly educated, his intelligence shines out when he does interviews in French and German without a moment's hesitation. The film shows how Lambert and Stamps artistic project reels out of control and becomes a monster that devours their hopes (as filmmakers) as well as taking Lambert's life. To me, the neglect of Lambert's decline tunes this film into something less than it should be: an examination of how high art and popular art make a powerful combination, and how someone with talent kills those who think they are talented (Townshend and Lambert). But Cooper, a cinematographer shoot well, but even the most compelling story trumps great shots.

    This is doc I wanted so badly to love. Stamp, Lambert and Townshend made musical history together, by constructing and working with the Who. Townshend, musical genius created there important works, Tommy, Lifehouse and Quadrophenia while Lambert and Stamp worked closely with him, although towards the end of their relationship, Lambert succumbed to Hollywood (the Tommy film) and then heroin. This film fails for me because we just gloss over Lambert's decline and death and proceeds to memorialize his memory. Lambert, the son of British a British composer and a prima ballerina, grew up in the world of high art. Brilliantly educated, his intelligence shines out when he does interviews in French and German without a moment's hesitation. The film shows how Lambert and Stamps artistic project reels out of control and becomes a monster that devours their hopes (as filmmakers) as well as taking Lambert's life. To me, the neglect of Lambert's decline tunes this film into something less than it should be: an examination of how high art and popular art make a powerful combination, and how someone with talent kills those who think they are talented (Townshend and Lambert). But Cooper, a cinematographer shoot well, but even the most compelling story trumps great shots.

  • Aug 26, 2015

    I love The Who, it is my favourite group ever. This Documentary explain why, thye didn't care about them, but about us.

    I love The Who, it is my favourite group ever. This Documentary explain why, thye didn't care about them, but about us.

  • Aug 21, 2015

    Christopher Stamp: "It's very difficult to know, you know, the moments you love someone a lot of the time."

    Christopher Stamp: "It's very difficult to know, you know, the moments you love someone a lot of the time."

  • Jun 13, 2015

    Let's play a little name association game, shall we? I'll write a name and you say out loud the first thing that comes into your mind. Okay? Okay. Here we go. Kit Lambert. Nothing? Okay. Christopher Stamp. Still nothing. How about Terence Stamp? Maybe a little flash of something? Maybe? Let's try... Roger Daltry. Pete Townshend. Keith Moon. John Entwistle. We probably got something from some or all of those names, but just in case we didn't, here's one more: The Who. Most people, even those who weren't born when their music was the most popular, are at least aware of the British rock band The Who, one of the most influential of the 20th century. All the names in this paragraph are a part of the story of The Who and the documentary "Lambert & Stamp" (R, 1:57) puts them all together. Kit Lambert and Christopher Stamp were very different young men when they started talking one day in a London pub in the early 1960s - and had no intentions of pursuing the careers which would end up linking their names together forever. Lambert was a rich kid with an Oxford education and a famous father (a composer and conductor of classical music). Stamp was a working class kid whose father was a tug boat captain who worked on London's Thames River. But these two young men shared a passion - for film. They both wanted to be directors, but they were both working as assistant directors and saw no realistic chance to move up the ladder in the film industry. After spending a day together, they hatched a rather audacious plan which would change their lives, and the lives of many other people as well. Both Lambert and Stamp were interested in the burgeoning youth mod culture. Their idea was to find a rock band that appealed to that particular segment of society, make that band famous and then make a movie about that band. After months of London nightlife, they finally found the band that they felt was perfect for their project. That band was called "The High Numbers". It would soon be renamed "The Who". Lambert and Stamp became the band's co-managers, with no experience whatsoever. These guys knew nothing about rock music, but they had big ideas, lots of confidence and it soon became clear that they had great instincts. They put The Who on the map and the rest is rock and roll history... and would qualify as a series of spoilers if I told you the rest of the story here. The documentary about Lambert and Stamp's lives and their personal and professional relationship is inextricably linked to the story of The Who, but the movie's focus remains on the two men who worked tirelessly to make the group famous. The film is driven mainly by interviews and illustrated by a large amount of historic photographs and archival footage. Interviewees include Christopher Stamp (but not Kit Lambert, who died in 1981), Chris' older brother, actor Terence Stamp (who, obviously, was around for much of this story and even helped finance his younger brother's ventures at some point), and, of course, the two surviving members of the original band The Who, Roger Daltry and Pete Townshend. But this documentary is a lot more than a series of talking heads. Since Lambert and Stamp were originally out to make a movie about The Who, they were doing a lot of filming, which provides this documentary's director, James D. Cooper, with an abundance of background footage which he uses quite well. The appeal of "Lambert & Stamp" has much to do with the enduring popularity of The Who's music, but it goes well beyond that. This documentary is a fascinating look behind the scenes at the music industry, at least in one particular time and place, and an unlikely story of two men from very different backgrounds coming up with an idea that was both clever and ambitious, but then succeeding beyond their wildest dreams - in a very different direction. On the level of a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction human drama and a kind of Behind the Behind the Music story, the film works well. Unfortunately, it could have worked even better - and should have - with just a few improvements. The interviews are not really interviews in that those clips mainly just show the subjects talking and when we do hear a question asked, it's not well-stated or well-mic'ed. The film also should have provided some more background - especially at the beginning. It was a little disorienting and frustrating to have no context to get into the story. The film's opening minutes even felt a bit disorganized. Still, this is an interesting and entertaining film that's likely to please music fans and anyone who just enjoys a good story. "B"

    Let's play a little name association game, shall we? I'll write a name and you say out loud the first thing that comes into your mind. Okay? Okay. Here we go. Kit Lambert. Nothing? Okay. Christopher Stamp. Still nothing. How about Terence Stamp? Maybe a little flash of something? Maybe? Let's try... Roger Daltry. Pete Townshend. Keith Moon. John Entwistle. We probably got something from some or all of those names, but just in case we didn't, here's one more: The Who. Most people, even those who weren't born when their music was the most popular, are at least aware of the British rock band The Who, one of the most influential of the 20th century. All the names in this paragraph are a part of the story of The Who and the documentary "Lambert & Stamp" (R, 1:57) puts them all together. Kit Lambert and Christopher Stamp were very different young men when they started talking one day in a London pub in the early 1960s - and had no intentions of pursuing the careers which would end up linking their names together forever. Lambert was a rich kid with an Oxford education and a famous father (a composer and conductor of classical music). Stamp was a working class kid whose father was a tug boat captain who worked on London's Thames River. But these two young men shared a passion - for film. They both wanted to be directors, but they were both working as assistant directors and saw no realistic chance to move up the ladder in the film industry. After spending a day together, they hatched a rather audacious plan which would change their lives, and the lives of many other people as well. Both Lambert and Stamp were interested in the burgeoning youth mod culture. Their idea was to find a rock band that appealed to that particular segment of society, make that band famous and then make a movie about that band. After months of London nightlife, they finally found the band that they felt was perfect for their project. That band was called "The High Numbers". It would soon be renamed "The Who". Lambert and Stamp became the band's co-managers, with no experience whatsoever. These guys knew nothing about rock music, but they had big ideas, lots of confidence and it soon became clear that they had great instincts. They put The Who on the map and the rest is rock and roll history... and would qualify as a series of spoilers if I told you the rest of the story here. The documentary about Lambert and Stamp's lives and their personal and professional relationship is inextricably linked to the story of The Who, but the movie's focus remains on the two men who worked tirelessly to make the group famous. The film is driven mainly by interviews and illustrated by a large amount of historic photographs and archival footage. Interviewees include Christopher Stamp (but not Kit Lambert, who died in 1981), Chris' older brother, actor Terence Stamp (who, obviously, was around for much of this story and even helped finance his younger brother's ventures at some point), and, of course, the two surviving members of the original band The Who, Roger Daltry and Pete Townshend. But this documentary is a lot more than a series of talking heads. Since Lambert and Stamp were originally out to make a movie about The Who, they were doing a lot of filming, which provides this documentary's director, James D. Cooper, with an abundance of background footage which he uses quite well. The appeal of "Lambert & Stamp" has much to do with the enduring popularity of The Who's music, but it goes well beyond that. This documentary is a fascinating look behind the scenes at the music industry, at least in one particular time and place, and an unlikely story of two men from very different backgrounds coming up with an idea that was both clever and ambitious, but then succeeding beyond their wildest dreams - in a very different direction. On the level of a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction human drama and a kind of Behind the Behind the Music story, the film works well. Unfortunately, it could have worked even better - and should have - with just a few improvements. The interviews are not really interviews in that those clips mainly just show the subjects talking and when we do hear a question asked, it's not well-stated or well-mic'ed. The film also should have provided some more background - especially at the beginning. It was a little disorienting and frustrating to have no context to get into the story. The film's opening minutes even felt a bit disorganized. Still, this is an interesting and entertaining film that's likely to please music fans and anyone who just enjoys a good story. "B"