Last Days Reviews

  • Sep 07, 2019

    This is a complete waste of time. It's like a film students project showing over an hour of just establishing shots. These shots establish nothing, and lead into more establishing shots. The shot of the window, for what felt like days, was brutal. Seriously, don't waste the time, it really really is that bad.

    This is a complete waste of time. It's like a film students project showing over an hour of just establishing shots. These shots establish nothing, and lead into more establishing shots. The shot of the window, for what felt like days, was brutal. Seriously, don't waste the time, it really really is that bad.

  • Mar 12, 2018

    Beautifully shot, moody, and atmospheric. Michael Pitt gives a great performance as a rock n roll ghost haunting his own final days among the living. He's a blur inside a house that bears his scars.

    Beautifully shot, moody, and atmospheric. Michael Pitt gives a great performance as a rock n roll ghost haunting his own final days among the living. He's a blur inside a house that bears his scars.

  • May 30, 2017

    Gus van Sant's Last Days is an altogether-too-human glimpse into the final pain and struggle of a young man, following him incessantly over the span of a couple of days. The film's Rosetta Stone is its own slow pace, allowing a viewer adequate space to observe the more subtle on-screen details (the medical wristband still worn by the suffering protagonist, Blake; almost discarded dialogue to which Blake barely responds; the aimless wardrobe changes), along with the non-linear chronology of the scenes. In several instances, a silent scene is cut short to invite another character's point of view onscreen, only to be revisited from another angle, or a seemingly insignificant development is placed under scrutiny by being "book-ended" between two indirectly related scenes. This is not a film which meanders without reason, contrary to what transpires on its surface. Observing (even experiencing) the excruciating degeneration of a lonely, black-hearted blonde boy unfold from the impenetrable distance from beyond the screen, the conscientious viewer is either revolted by the complex monotony of the film's trajectory, or oppressed by the insights deflected ny the characters' sealed (even selfish?) motives. It is, for either of these reasons, an exceptionally difficult film to watch, but it does reward the dedicated viewer by providing a sense of mood (even, at points, a gallery of dark, sublime and subtle, humour) within the viewer's own experience. "Last Days" neither judges nor reveals its secrets by means of conventional movie tropes. It remains poignant, if not profound, and deserves to be seen by anyone who looks to absorb some modicum of the despair encapsulated by substance abuse and severe depression. In a sense, it is through witnessing events through the passive, objective, unblinking eye of the camera that brings a sense of comprehension - although, the deeper personal questions remain enigmatic. But then, that's how things go in life, isn't it?

    Gus van Sant's Last Days is an altogether-too-human glimpse into the final pain and struggle of a young man, following him incessantly over the span of a couple of days. The film's Rosetta Stone is its own slow pace, allowing a viewer adequate space to observe the more subtle on-screen details (the medical wristband still worn by the suffering protagonist, Blake; almost discarded dialogue to which Blake barely responds; the aimless wardrobe changes), along with the non-linear chronology of the scenes. In several instances, a silent scene is cut short to invite another character's point of view onscreen, only to be revisited from another angle, or a seemingly insignificant development is placed under scrutiny by being "book-ended" between two indirectly related scenes. This is not a film which meanders without reason, contrary to what transpires on its surface. Observing (even experiencing) the excruciating degeneration of a lonely, black-hearted blonde boy unfold from the impenetrable distance from beyond the screen, the conscientious viewer is either revolted by the complex monotony of the film's trajectory, or oppressed by the insights deflected ny the characters' sealed (even selfish?) motives. It is, for either of these reasons, an exceptionally difficult film to watch, but it does reward the dedicated viewer by providing a sense of mood (even, at points, a gallery of dark, sublime and subtle, humour) within the viewer's own experience. "Last Days" neither judges nor reveals its secrets by means of conventional movie tropes. It remains poignant, if not profound, and deserves to be seen by anyone who looks to absorb some modicum of the despair encapsulated by substance abuse and severe depression. In a sense, it is through witnessing events through the passive, objective, unblinking eye of the camera that brings a sense of comprehension - although, the deeper personal questions remain enigmatic. But then, that's how things go in life, isn't it?

  • May 29, 2016

    The main character in this film is clearly meant to be Kurt Cobain, he looks exactly like him and wears all of the same clothes and he's in a band and depressed. I just don't know why Van Sant would want to make a work of fiction giving us an alternative ending to Cobains life. Perhaps that is what we have to figure out. The film is generally pretty boring and the title sort of gives away the ending.

    The main character in this film is clearly meant to be Kurt Cobain, he looks exactly like him and wears all of the same clothes and he's in a band and depressed. I just don't know why Van Sant would want to make a work of fiction giving us an alternative ending to Cobains life. Perhaps that is what we have to figure out. The film is generally pretty boring and the title sort of gives away the ending.

  • Oct 07, 2015

    complete waste of time

    complete waste of time

  • Aug 13, 2015

    Minimalistic cinema or experimental cinema is always a tricky thing and here it's unwatchable.

    Minimalistic cinema or experimental cinema is always a tricky thing and here it's unwatchable.

  • Jun 03, 2015

    Disappointing. While I love some of Van Sants other work this portrays Cobain as a mumbling idiot, while I'm not saying he was perfect he was certainly more than that. Listening to his insightful eloquent interviews in About A Son could not be further removed from this complete mess. This was purely a case of Van Sant wanting to make his kind of film regardless of who Cobain actually was. Yes it may provide some kind of insight into his final days.... But not much given the none dialogue, it fails at every and any level to show that Kurt Cobain was a talented musician and voice of a generation. Epic fail!!!!

    Disappointing. While I love some of Van Sants other work this portrays Cobain as a mumbling idiot, while I'm not saying he was perfect he was certainly more than that. Listening to his insightful eloquent interviews in About A Son could not be further removed from this complete mess. This was purely a case of Van Sant wanting to make his kind of film regardless of who Cobain actually was. Yes it may provide some kind of insight into his final days.... But not much given the none dialogue, it fails at every and any level to show that Kurt Cobain was a talented musician and voice of a generation. Epic fail!!!!

  • May 30, 2015

    Don't believe those who missed the point. (Though, of course there is no point.) This is a superb tragicomedy, in fact faultless. While Van Sant is notoriously hit and miss; along with his central protagonist he scores a direct hit here.

    Don't believe those who missed the point. (Though, of course there is no point.) This is a superb tragicomedy, in fact faultless. While Van Sant is notoriously hit and miss; along with his central protagonist he scores a direct hit here.

  • May 08, 2015

    I love nirvana. I hated this movie.

    I love nirvana. I hated this movie.

  • Mar 27, 2015

    boring! just keep on pressing fast forward so i can see the end of the film....

    boring! just keep on pressing fast forward so i can see the end of the film....