Megane (2008) - Rotten Tomatoes
There's a lot of talk about the "visceral power of film." But Megane takes a step further, manifesting a process whereby the viewer can partake in the characters' peace. As Yuji and Sakura prepare exquisite meals and practice playful exercises on the sand, we, like Taeko, begin to yield to their pace and absorb their benevolence. As all engage in "twilighting," a pastime involving staring into space, we, too, find that our breathing deepens, our gaze relaxes. Watching Megane becomes a meditation.

A soulful journey rife with subtle "aha" moments, Megane is minimalist and quiet but never didactic or serious. Like a good Buddhist teacher, its unexpected humor delights and thaws us. --© Sundance Film Festival" />
There's a lot of talk about the "visceral power of film." But Megane takes a step further, manifesting a process whereby the viewer can partake in the characters' peace. As Yuji and Sakura prepare exquisite meals and practice playful exercises on the sand, we, like Taeko, begin to yield to their pace and absorb their benevolence. As all engage in "twilighting," a pastime involving staring into space, we, too, find that our breathing deepens, our gaze relaxes. Watching Megane becomes a meditation.

A soulful journey rife with subtle "aha" moments, Megane is minimalist and quiet but never didactic or serious. Like a good Buddhist teacher, its unexpected humor delights and thaws us. --© Sundance Film Festival">

Megane (2008)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Movie Info

Among the most memorable things about Megane are an empty white beach, a luminous turquoise sea, and a verdant country road. Descending on this paradise, Taeko, a buttoned-up, bespectacled woman dragging a very large suitcase, checks into a tiny seaside inn. Expecting to be left alone, she's put off when the hotel's proprietor, Yuji, sits down to eat with her. She's even more disgruntled when Sakura, a placid, revered older woman, takes the liberty of entering Taeko's room to wake her up! But seeking haven at another hotel proves farcical, and Taeko sheepishly returns to her unconventional hosts. Relieved, she gradually tunes into their simple community and cultivates what Yuji calls "the talent to be here."

There's a lot of talk about the "visceral power of film." But Megane takes a step further, manifesting a process whereby the viewer can partake in the characters' peace. As Yuji and Sakura prepare exquisite meals and practice playful exercises on the sand, we, like Taeko, begin to yield to their pace and absorb their benevolence. As all engage in "twilighting," a pastime involving staring into space, we, too, find that our breathing deepens, our gaze relaxes. Watching Megane becomes a meditation.

A soulful journey rife with subtle "aha" moments, Megane is minimalist and quiet but never didactic or serious. Like a good Buddhist teacher, its unexpected humor delights and thaws us. --© Sundance Film Festival

Cast

Critic Reviews for Megane

All Critics (5) | Top Critics (3)

Just because a predictable narrative comes laden with pretty pictures and Zen quirk, that doesn't make its platitudinous ideology any less grating.

March 11, 2009
Time Out
Top Critic

Vaguely magical, insistently modern fable that could become an arthouse hit, even a cult fave.

Full Review… | January 22, 2008
Variety
Top Critic

A thoroughly enchanting drama about an up-tight and driven woman who is softened and opened up by the slow and sensuous rhythms of island time and living in the present moment.

Full Review… | March 22, 2008
Spirituality and Practice

Megane is the type of cutesy-quaint foreign import that's just about insufferable.

Full Review… | March 17, 2008
Slant Magazine

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