Men, Women & Children Reviews

  • Jan 13, 2020

    SANDLER KILLS IT. I love all of Adams movies but when he gets a serious role he just absolutely kills it every single time. I enjoyed this movie and loved the message I 100% recommend.

    SANDLER KILLS IT. I love all of Adams movies but when he gets a serious role he just absolutely kills it every single time. I enjoyed this movie and loved the message I 100% recommend.

  • Aug 25, 2019

    It's hard to believe Jason Reitman even made this. It is bizarre, unfunny, and worst of all, boring.

    It's hard to believe Jason Reitman even made this. It is bizarre, unfunny, and worst of all, boring.

  • May 01, 2019

    This movie tries and attempt at showing aspects of modern life revolving around the use of the internet in several different disconnected stories. It touches on some serious topics (many) but does so well. It is weird to see Adam Sandler in a role such as this but it is really a good representation of how he can succeed as more than just a comedian. Ansel Elgort really makes you feel and the repeated use of Carl Sagan's Pale Blue Dot has some deep meaning around the character. The visualized internet mixed with reality works in the film but is not something that I would recommend to be used often in future films. If I were to review just the story of Tim, Brandy, and their parents, I'd give it a 4.5 out of 5; but seeing as I'm reviewing the movie as a whole, I would have to give it what I gave it.

    This movie tries and attempt at showing aspects of modern life revolving around the use of the internet in several different disconnected stories. It touches on some serious topics (many) but does so well. It is weird to see Adam Sandler in a role such as this but it is really a good representation of how he can succeed as more than just a comedian. Ansel Elgort really makes you feel and the repeated use of Carl Sagan's Pale Blue Dot has some deep meaning around the character. The visualized internet mixed with reality works in the film but is not something that I would recommend to be used often in future films. If I were to review just the story of Tim, Brandy, and their parents, I'd give it a 4.5 out of 5; but seeing as I'm reviewing the movie as a whole, I would have to give it what I gave it.

  • Apr 20, 2019

    Very poignant and speaks to the dangers of taking things to the extreme.

    Very poignant and speaks to the dangers of taking things to the extreme.

  • Apr 19, 2019

    Last night I was considering watching Martin Scorsese's 161 minute religious epic Silence (2016), a film which concerns two Portuguese Jesuit Priests who travel to Japan, where Christianity is outlawed, to find their superior. I am sure that film is incredibly beautiful and a powerful feat of filmmaking but it sounded like a terrifically dull option on a Sunday night when I wanted to watch something I had a vague connection to after sitting through Shazam! (2019) in the cinema. That lead me to consider watching Jason Reitman's Men, Women and Children before finishing my Scorsese series because it partially concerned teenagers in the modern day and seemed like an easy viewing experience. The film features an ensemble cast, with Donald Truby, Adam Sandler, and his wife Helen, Rosemarie DeWitt, both engaging in infidelity, she through AshleyMadison.com and he with an $800 an hour call girl. Their son Chris is addicted to hardcore pornography and struggles to become sexually aroused at the sight of his new girlfriend Hannah Clint, whose Mother, Judy Greer, takes inappropriate pictures of her that lead to her expulsion from a reality television show. Tim Mooney, Ansel Elgort, has recently quit the football team and become sucked into an MMORPG, Guild Wars, partly as a result of his Mother abandoning he and his Father. Mooney begins a relationship with Brandy Beltmeyer, Kaitlyn Dever, whose Mother, Jennifer Garner, obsessively watches over her technology use and works hard to sabotage her new relationship. Allison Doss is one of Hannah's fellow cheerleaders and she suffers from anorexia in addition to nursing unrequited love for manipulative football player Brandon Lender, Will Peltz. Each character interacts with technology in some way that is â~dangerous' and oh, Emma Thompson narrates the film saying phrases like "titty fucking" and "hard cock" over shots of the Voyager satellite which is meant to relate to the events of the film in some way. The whole thing is ridiculous but it is undeniably enjoyable to watch Jennifer Garner pout as she frowns at her daughter's text messages. The whole film feels like a very expensive, beautifully furnished PureFlix venture and the screenplay's tone always seems slightly off, erring into self-parody for a large portion of the film. It is this quality that makes the movie campily enjoyable and the presence of familiar faces lulls you into the two hours of ham-fisted â~messaging' about the evils of technology. The film at least reaches for contemporary issues and struggles that I, a 16 year old girl, have faced like eating disorders and unrequited crushes. Of course everyone on screen is living a heightened American life and they are mostly beautiful but I still feel more connection to them than I felt in any of the recent Scorsese films I have watched. The performances all feel slightly off-kilter too as the actors, particularly Garner and Greer, seem unsure of what tone they are meant to be taking meaning that they will play one scene comically before reverting to high drama in the next. This tonal imbalance is disconcerting and lets down the messages that the film is trying to send but are we really meant to take Garner's horrified stare as she watches Elgort, having recently survived a suicide attempt, be consoled by her daughter. Why are we suddenly meant to pity Sandler's sexual deviant son? It is so often unclear how we are meant to feel about characters and when the film hits you over the head with the sort of music that denotes an â~emotional' scene it feels unearned, artificial and slightly funny. It appears that Reitman had completely earnest intentions in making this film and did not understand that often the audience is laughing at it not with it. It was damn entertaining though and that is more than I can say for most films I have watched recently. It is one of his worst but not quite as ridiculous as Labor Day (2013). Reitman is now back on track with Tully (2018) but this strange bump in the road of a film is ridiculous but a decent watch if you just want to lie back, occasionally being sharply awoken by the crazy actions of Jennifer Garner or Judy Greer asking about child prostitution laws, it is that uneven of a film and that made it a comfort food of sorts in between Scorsese â~prestige' pictures.

    Last night I was considering watching Martin Scorsese's 161 minute religious epic Silence (2016), a film which concerns two Portuguese Jesuit Priests who travel to Japan, where Christianity is outlawed, to find their superior. I am sure that film is incredibly beautiful and a powerful feat of filmmaking but it sounded like a terrifically dull option on a Sunday night when I wanted to watch something I had a vague connection to after sitting through Shazam! (2019) in the cinema. That lead me to consider watching Jason Reitman's Men, Women and Children before finishing my Scorsese series because it partially concerned teenagers in the modern day and seemed like an easy viewing experience. The film features an ensemble cast, with Donald Truby, Adam Sandler, and his wife Helen, Rosemarie DeWitt, both engaging in infidelity, she through AshleyMadison.com and he with an $800 an hour call girl. Their son Chris is addicted to hardcore pornography and struggles to become sexually aroused at the sight of his new girlfriend Hannah Clint, whose Mother, Judy Greer, takes inappropriate pictures of her that lead to her expulsion from a reality television show. Tim Mooney, Ansel Elgort, has recently quit the football team and become sucked into an MMORPG, Guild Wars, partly as a result of his Mother abandoning he and his Father. Mooney begins a relationship with Brandy Beltmeyer, Kaitlyn Dever, whose Mother, Jennifer Garner, obsessively watches over her technology use and works hard to sabotage her new relationship. Allison Doss is one of Hannah's fellow cheerleaders and she suffers from anorexia in addition to nursing unrequited love for manipulative football player Brandon Lender, Will Peltz. Each character interacts with technology in some way that is â~dangerous' and oh, Emma Thompson narrates the film saying phrases like "titty fucking" and "hard cock" over shots of the Voyager satellite which is meant to relate to the events of the film in some way. The whole thing is ridiculous but it is undeniably enjoyable to watch Jennifer Garner pout as she frowns at her daughter's text messages. The whole film feels like a very expensive, beautifully furnished PureFlix venture and the screenplay's tone always seems slightly off, erring into self-parody for a large portion of the film. It is this quality that makes the movie campily enjoyable and the presence of familiar faces lulls you into the two hours of ham-fisted â~messaging' about the evils of technology. The film at least reaches for contemporary issues and struggles that I, a 16 year old girl, have faced like eating disorders and unrequited crushes. Of course everyone on screen is living a heightened American life and they are mostly beautiful but I still feel more connection to them than I felt in any of the recent Scorsese films I have watched. The performances all feel slightly off-kilter too as the actors, particularly Garner and Greer, seem unsure of what tone they are meant to be taking meaning that they will play one scene comically before reverting to high drama in the next. This tonal imbalance is disconcerting and lets down the messages that the film is trying to send but are we really meant to take Garner's horrified stare as she watches Elgort, having recently survived a suicide attempt, be consoled by her daughter. Why are we suddenly meant to pity Sandler's sexual deviant son? It is so often unclear how we are meant to feel about characters and when the film hits you over the head with the sort of music that denotes an â~emotional' scene it feels unearned, artificial and slightly funny. It appears that Reitman had completely earnest intentions in making this film and did not understand that often the audience is laughing at it not with it. It was damn entertaining though and that is more than I can say for most films I have watched recently. It is one of his worst but not quite as ridiculous as Labor Day (2013). Reitman is now back on track with Tully (2018) but this strange bump in the road of a film is ridiculous but a decent watch if you just want to lie back, occasionally being sharply awoken by the crazy actions of Jennifer Garner or Judy Greer asking about child prostitution laws, it is that uneven of a film and that made it a comfort food of sorts in between Scorsese â~prestige' pictures.

  • Jan 11, 2019

    This is an incredible film and gives us a glimpse inside the world of today's teenager as well as into the world of the parents. It shows the trouble teens have truly connecting and how personas aren't really the true self. I can't believe it's rating is so low. I have been recommending this film to everyone I know. It is an important work.

    This is an incredible film and gives us a glimpse inside the world of today's teenager as well as into the world of the parents. It shows the trouble teens have truly connecting and how personas aren't really the true self. I can't believe it's rating is so low. I have been recommending this film to everyone I know. It is an important work.

  • Jan 06, 2019

    Paulina: 6.5 James:8.5 Too stereotypical, tries to do a lot of things but doesn't do any of them amazingly. Still interesting

    Paulina: 6.5 James:8.5 Too stereotypical, tries to do a lot of things but doesn't do any of them amazingly. Still interesting

  • Nov 05, 2018

    just watched this movie on boxxy software and it was absolutely amazing, the trailer doesn't give it justice.

    just watched this movie on boxxy software and it was absolutely amazing, the trailer doesn't give it justice.

  • Dec 05, 2017

    I thought it was an excellent film....acting was spot on and the characters were real...

    I thought it was an excellent film....acting was spot on and the characters were real...

  • Jun 29, 2017

    This movie had a lot of moving pieces... sometimes hard to follow... but also a scary look at the youth culture of today's social media age.

    This movie had a lot of moving pieces... sometimes hard to follow... but also a scary look at the youth culture of today's social media age.