Oklahoma! Reviews

  • 23h ago

    I enjoyed the musical numbers and the acting of an era of 50 & 60.

    I enjoyed the musical numbers and the acting of an era of 50 & 60.

  • May 07, 2020

    There are elements in Oklahoma that I think could have turned me off if I saw it for the first time today, because I do tend to be a bit more critical of film now. The movie splits time between two different stories that don’t intersect enough to warrant them both being in the same film. I could see myself complaining that they needed to pick which was the A-story and find a way to roll that B-story more into the main plotline. Then there’s the 18-minute-long dream ballet that halts the movie in its tracks. These things can be difficult for me to accept, particularly when they don’t further the plot but only retell it. However, this wasn’t my first time watching Oklahoma, in fact it is a film I watched dozens of times growing up. I have a strong emotional attachment to Oklahoma and have come to accept these things as part of its charm. I love the cast and all the characters they play in Oklahoma. Gordon MacRae is a charming leading man who has a great big singing voice, and Shirley Jones can match him beat for beat. I love their playful courting, as they battle to see who will swallow their pride first and admit that they are in love. Gene Nelson and Gloria Grahame have a completely different tone to their relationship, which is a nice change of pace. They bring a lot of the comedy to the film which I enjoyed. Gloria Grahame’s strange speech pattern (apparently amplified by excessive plastic surgery) actually works to make a truly unique character that sounds so different from the characters she had been portraying in film noir up to that point. The rest of the cast is filled out with a number of other great actors including familiar names like Eddie Albert, Rod Steiger, and James Whitmore. What truly makes Oklahoma a great film, though, is the music. There are so many delightful songs in this film, and they don’t fall into the trap of each one sounding just like the others. Some are big grandiose ballads, some are more narrative, some are romantic, while others are just playful. In at least half of the songs there are lyrics that make me laugh, and there’s not one that I would take out of the film. I know each of these songs by heart and cannot stop myself from singing along, even when I was trying to just be an observer this time to look at the film as critically as possible. Then I find myself humming the tunes for days. I genuinely think that Oklahoma is wonderful, but it’s impossible to know how much nostalgia plays into that opinion, and I don’t really care. I can’t wait to watch it again!

    There are elements in Oklahoma that I think could have turned me off if I saw it for the first time today, because I do tend to be a bit more critical of film now. The movie splits time between two different stories that don’t intersect enough to warrant them both being in the same film. I could see myself complaining that they needed to pick which was the A-story and find a way to roll that B-story more into the main plotline. Then there’s the 18-minute-long dream ballet that halts the movie in its tracks. These things can be difficult for me to accept, particularly when they don’t further the plot but only retell it. However, this wasn’t my first time watching Oklahoma, in fact it is a film I watched dozens of times growing up. I have a strong emotional attachment to Oklahoma and have come to accept these things as part of its charm. I love the cast and all the characters they play in Oklahoma. Gordon MacRae is a charming leading man who has a great big singing voice, and Shirley Jones can match him beat for beat. I love their playful courting, as they battle to see who will swallow their pride first and admit that they are in love. Gene Nelson and Gloria Grahame have a completely different tone to their relationship, which is a nice change of pace. They bring a lot of the comedy to the film which I enjoyed. Gloria Grahame’s strange speech pattern (apparently amplified by excessive plastic surgery) actually works to make a truly unique character that sounds so different from the characters she had been portraying in film noir up to that point. The rest of the cast is filled out with a number of other great actors including familiar names like Eddie Albert, Rod Steiger, and James Whitmore. What truly makes Oklahoma a great film, though, is the music. There are so many delightful songs in this film, and they don’t fall into the trap of each one sounding just like the others. Some are big grandiose ballads, some are more narrative, some are romantic, while others are just playful. In at least half of the songs there are lyrics that make me laugh, and there’s not one that I would take out of the film. I know each of these songs by heart and cannot stop myself from singing along, even when I was trying to just be an observer this time to look at the film as critically as possible. Then I find myself humming the tunes for days. I genuinely think that Oklahoma is wonderful, but it’s impossible to know how much nostalgia plays into that opinion, and I don’t really care. I can’t wait to watch it again!

  • May 04, 2020

    I remember liking Oklahoma more. However, watching this movie as an adult with my wife and kids was a different experience. This movie hasn't aged well. Some of the musical numbers go on a little long and some of the plot points are cringe-worthy. I still like it, but I don't think this will be a musical we watch regularly as a family.

    I remember liking Oklahoma more. However, watching this movie as an adult with my wife and kids was a different experience. This movie hasn't aged well. Some of the musical numbers go on a little long and some of the plot points are cringe-worthy. I still like it, but I don't think this will be a musical we watch regularly as a family.

  • Dec 30, 2019

    Oklahoma! is one of the great Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals and they certainly knew how to write a good tune as this 1955 movie version proves. The tunes just keep coming and coming right from the opening titles to the dying scenes. It has a terrific cast with my own personal favourite being Charlotte Greenwood as matriarch, Aunt Eller who's niece, Laurey gains the romantic attentions of upright cowboy, Curley and dark, brooding farm hand Judd. The two suitors compete for here affections which leads to a tragedy. To be fair, the outcome is never in doubt and Curley and Laurey sing their way through to the happy ending that everyone wants. It is all done in glorious technicolour with not a hint of realism to be found...there's even a slightly surrealistic dream-scene ballet. Curley, played with just the right amount of lantern-jawed zeal by Gordon MacRae does get all the best tunes but he doesn't by any means have it all to himself with Gloria Grahame belting out a couple of memorable comic numbers. Until recently rewatching the movie, I had forgotten that Judd Fry, the baddie of the piece, was portrayed by Rod Steiger and, though not his best performance by quite a distance, he is suitably menacing. Although the ending does feel somewhat rushed and hap-hazard, this is a fantastic, blockbuster of a musical from the golden age and is a real treat with a stockade full of rousing tunes that you can sing along to as you enjoy the visuals.

    Oklahoma! is one of the great Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals and they certainly knew how to write a good tune as this 1955 movie version proves. The tunes just keep coming and coming right from the opening titles to the dying scenes. It has a terrific cast with my own personal favourite being Charlotte Greenwood as matriarch, Aunt Eller who's niece, Laurey gains the romantic attentions of upright cowboy, Curley and dark, brooding farm hand Judd. The two suitors compete for here affections which leads to a tragedy. To be fair, the outcome is never in doubt and Curley and Laurey sing their way through to the happy ending that everyone wants. It is all done in glorious technicolour with not a hint of realism to be found...there's even a slightly surrealistic dream-scene ballet. Curley, played with just the right amount of lantern-jawed zeal by Gordon MacRae does get all the best tunes but he doesn't by any means have it all to himself with Gloria Grahame belting out a couple of memorable comic numbers. Until recently rewatching the movie, I had forgotten that Judd Fry, the baddie of the piece, was portrayed by Rod Steiger and, though not his best performance by quite a distance, he is suitably menacing. Although the ending does feel somewhat rushed and hap-hazard, this is a fantastic, blockbuster of a musical from the golden age and is a real treat with a stockade full of rousing tunes that you can sing along to as you enjoy the visuals.

  • Apr 12, 2019

    Like most old musicals, the songs are more memorable than the actual movie itself.

    Like most old musicals, the songs are more memorable than the actual movie itself.

  • Dec 17, 2018

    The film has great musical numbers and Dancing. But it is sadly stitched together by bad protagonists and stereotypes.

    The film has great musical numbers and Dancing. But it is sadly stitched together by bad protagonists and stereotypes.

  • May 07, 2018

    Act one is boring, but near the ending this movie grows on you with its incredible choreography and character development, along with its beautiful songs

    Act one is boring, but near the ending this movie grows on you with its incredible choreography and character development, along with its beautiful songs

  • Aug 26, 2017

    Rodgers and Hammerstein's 1943 Broadway groundbreaker was finally made into a film in 1955 and became Hollywood's first roadshow musical, and stays remarkably faithful to the hit show (only two songs were dropped); the casting is almost perfect with Gordon MacRea and Shirley Jones (in her film debut) in fine voice, Gene Nelson as a singing/dancing Will, and the offbeat casting of Gloria Grahame as Ado Annie. The film itself won Oscars for Sound Recording and Scoring.

    Rodgers and Hammerstein's 1943 Broadway groundbreaker was finally made into a film in 1955 and became Hollywood's first roadshow musical, and stays remarkably faithful to the hit show (only two songs were dropped); the casting is almost perfect with Gordon MacRea and Shirley Jones (in her film debut) in fine voice, Gene Nelson as a singing/dancing Will, and the offbeat casting of Gloria Grahame as Ado Annie. The film itself won Oscars for Sound Recording and Scoring.

  • Jan 27, 2017

    Menarik ketika melihat film yang hampir semua pemerannya sudah meninggal

    Menarik ketika melihat film yang hampir semua pemerannya sudah meninggal

  • Jan 17, 2017

    Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back again, territory obtains federal status. In between there are some of the best songs broadway produced. For that reason alone you should watch it. But be aware that the characters are as flat as the landscape. The cowmen -v- farmers barn dance is a stormer but this is, of course, a dance-off between two stereotypes. If a bomb dropped on the entire town halfway through your reaction might be 'That's a pity' before going off to make a cup of coffee; but you'd still miss the songs.

    Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back again, territory obtains federal status. In between there are some of the best songs broadway produced. For that reason alone you should watch it. But be aware that the characters are as flat as the landscape. The cowmen -v- farmers barn dance is a stormer but this is, of course, a dance-off between two stereotypes. If a bomb dropped on the entire town halfway through your reaction might be 'That's a pity' before going off to make a cup of coffee; but you'd still miss the songs.