Power Trip Reviews

  • Mar 16, 2016

    This is a wild movie. The clash between the Georgians that want power, and the Americans that want to get paid for providing power leads to an epic struggle. The movie presents both sides pretty fairly, so it is easy to empathize with both sides. Besides the corrupt businesses that bribe their way out of bills, there really aren't any bad guys. Just a struggle to get what you need to survive in a city without enough resources. There are some great characters to follow in the struggle that keep you hopeful. Highly recommended, but it might depress you a bit.

    This is a wild movie. The clash between the Georgians that want power, and the Americans that want to get paid for providing power leads to an epic struggle. The movie presents both sides pretty fairly, so it is easy to empathize with both sides. Besides the corrupt businesses that bribe their way out of bills, there really aren't any bad guys. Just a struggle to get what you need to survive in a city without enough resources. There are some great characters to follow in the struggle that keep you hopeful. Highly recommended, but it might depress you a bit.

  • Aug 19, 2009

    This documentary sheds some light on the troubles plaguing the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. While it is informative and intellectually engaging, it falls down when it tries to elicit sympathy for a company from the U.S. that made the mistake of purchasing the power distribution business for Tblisi. Throughout the film, we here grand proclamations of how Corporate America wants to do good for the Georgian people. Throughout the film, it is difficult to take these proclamations seriously. The clincher is in one of the movie's epilogue captions, which tells us that the corporation eventually sold its interests out to a Russian company and that Russia now controls 75% of the power supply in Georgia. Once again, self-righteous and moralizing Americans are complicit in bringing about the worst possible outcome. No suprise there.

    This documentary sheds some light on the troubles plaguing the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. While it is informative and intellectually engaging, it falls down when it tries to elicit sympathy for a company from the U.S. that made the mistake of purchasing the power distribution business for Tblisi. Throughout the film, we here grand proclamations of how Corporate America wants to do good for the Georgian people. Throughout the film, it is difficult to take these proclamations seriously. The clincher is in one of the movie's epilogue captions, which tells us that the corporation eventually sold its interests out to a Russian company and that Russia now controls 75% of the power supply in Georgia. Once again, self-righteous and moralizing Americans are complicit in bringing about the worst possible outcome. No suprise there.

  • Jan 15, 2009

    Energy supply in a Russian way. Interesting. Trailer: www.powertripthemovie.com

    Energy supply in a Russian way. Interesting. Trailer: www.powertripthemovie.com

  • Nov 24, 2008

    We take electricity for granted in this country. This PBS documentary "sheds some light" on what it's like to live in the dark with someone else's thumb on the switch. More info: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/powertrip/film.html

    We take electricity for granted in this country. This PBS documentary "sheds some light" on what it's like to live in the dark with someone else's thumb on the switch. More info: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/powertrip/film.html

  • Nov 24, 2008

    As far as documentaries go, this one is first rate. I say so, because it really does represent a full spectrum of viewpoints, information, and history without making it a one-sided issue. I was especially surprised at how little I knew about Georgian political history, as well as the current issues faced by this tiny former Soviet nation. Very well done, certainly worth the education:)

    As far as documentaries go, this one is first rate. I say so, because it really does represent a full spectrum of viewpoints, information, and history without making it a one-sided issue. I was especially surprised at how little I knew about Georgian political history, as well as the current issues faced by this tiny former Soviet nation. Very well done, certainly worth the education:)

  • Aug 12, 2008

    Amazing and Amsuing. Dark, yet Hopeful. The depressingly corrupt government vies with a socially responsible electric company that invests a lot just to get Georgians to pay their electric bill before being forced to leave by their investors. And this is the country that Russia just invaded.

    Amazing and Amsuing. Dark, yet Hopeful. The depressingly corrupt government vies with a socially responsible electric company that invests a lot just to get Georgians to pay their electric bill before being forced to leave by their investors. And this is the country that Russia just invaded.

  • Jul 09, 2008

    This documentary was a real eye-opener when it comes to dealing with international corporations' issues in other countries. The story focuses on a USA corporation that buys the energy-supplier company for the Country of Georgia. Sometimes the film seems a bit sluggish, but has a some serious punches towards the end. If you have an interest in international business, this film is a must-see.

    This documentary was a real eye-opener when it comes to dealing with international corporations' issues in other countries. The story focuses on a USA corporation that buys the energy-supplier company for the Country of Georgia. Sometimes the film seems a bit sluggish, but has a some serious punches towards the end. If you have an interest in international business, this film is a must-see.

  • Dec 27, 2007

    Pretty strong documentary with plenty of ups and downs. Not as dry as the description would lead you to believe, and as of yet, the best look into Georgia on the big screen. For the most part it is a humourous look at the energy crisis in Georgia, and this lighter hearted slant makes the movie much more enjoyable than it would have been had it been shot otherwise. Watching Georgians argue with the electric company is rather interesting, as are their ingenious methods to steal power.

    Pretty strong documentary with plenty of ups and downs. Not as dry as the description would lead you to believe, and as of yet, the best look into Georgia on the big screen. For the most part it is a humourous look at the energy crisis in Georgia, and this lighter hearted slant makes the movie much more enjoyable than it would have been had it been shot otherwise. Watching Georgians argue with the electric company is rather interesting, as are their ingenious methods to steal power.

  • Dec 14, 2007

    An American energy corporation tries to provide power to Georgia, once part of the Soviet republic ... no wonder sparks fly. Documentary.

    An American energy corporation tries to provide power to Georgia, once part of the Soviet republic ... no wonder sparks fly. Documentary.

  • Nov 26, 2007

    Interesting view of how a former Soviet state struggles to make its way in a capitalist economy...and how the people struggle in the middle. It's hard to tell at times in this film who the good guys and bad guys are...and whether that's intentional or not by the filmmakers. AES is run by Dennis Bakke who also wrote a book, "Joy at Work", and I didn't know the connection was there with this movie until I watched it -- I'd read the book a few years ago, and you can absolutely see ideas which Bakke champions, being discussed/wrestled-with by the AES people on the ground in Tblisis. Worth seeing.

    Interesting view of how a former Soviet state struggles to make its way in a capitalist economy...and how the people struggle in the middle. It's hard to tell at times in this film who the good guys and bad guys are...and whether that's intentional or not by the filmmakers. AES is run by Dennis Bakke who also wrote a book, "Joy at Work", and I didn't know the connection was there with this movie until I watched it -- I'd read the book a few years ago, and you can absolutely see ideas which Bakke champions, being discussed/wrestled-with by the AES people on the ground in Tblisis. Worth seeing.