Privilege

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

47%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 15

74%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 403
User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)



  • You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

Movie Info

Britain's biggest pop singer, Steven Shorter (Paul Jones), receives unwavering adulation and possesses total control over his rabid fans, which includes nearly the entire population. Yet Shorter is not an autonomous performer -- he is little more than a puppet for the government, promoting whatever agenda they see fit. When a beautiful artist, Vanessa Ritchie (Jean Shrimpton), is commissioned to paint his portrait, she pushes Shorter to question his obedience to his manipulative handlers.

Cast

Paul Jones
as Steve Shorter
Jean Shrimpton
as Vanessa Ritchie
Mark London
as Alvin Kirsch
William Job
as Andrew Butler
Max Bacon
as Julie Jordan
Jeremy Child
as Martin Crossley
James Cossins
as Prof. Tatham
Frederick Danner
as Marcus Hooper
Victor Henry
as Freddie K.
Arthur Pentelow
as Leo Stanley
Michael Barrington
as Bishop of Essex
Edwin Finn
as Bishop of Cornwall
John Gill
as Bishop of Surrey
Norman Pitt
as Bishop of Hersham
Alba
as Bishop of Rutland
Doreen Mantle
as Miss Crawford
Michael Graham Cox
as Timothy Arbutt
View All

Critic Reviews for Privilege

All Critics (15) | Top Critics (5) | Fresh (7) | Rotten (8)

  • This is a bitter, uncompromising movie, and although it isn't quite successful it is fascinating and important.

    April 12, 2016 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…
  • There's no denying Watkins' ambition and intelligence in this satire of the rock world being used by the Establishment... but much of the acting is poor, while the tone is frequently far too hysterical for its own good.

    April 12, 2016 | Full Review…

    Geoff Andrew

    Time Out
    Top Critic
  • Peter Watkins's hysterical vision of rock and roll fascism was timely in 1967, though it now seems too much a stern warning to youth to be taken seriously.

    April 12, 2016 | Full Review…
  • Trouble with Privilege is that it cannot make up its mind whether it's a crusading film for the intelligentsia or a snide, 'with it' comedy.

    April 12, 2016 | Full Review…

    Variety Staff

    Variety
    Top Critic
  • Ultimately, Privilege is less a picture than a frame.

    April 12, 2016 | Full Review…
    TIME Magazine
    Top Critic
  • Privilege has no identity nor direction of its own, though an awesome amount of energy is expended in trying to make us think so.

    February 3, 2020 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Privilege

  • Mar 20, 2012
    Made in 1967, "Privilege" at first seems to be little more than just a reaction against Beatlemania as it starts with a ticker tape parade for rock star Steven Shorter(Paul Jones) in his home town of Birmingham, England.(If Jones' performance appears to be affectless, it might be on purpose, as the general idea here is to make Shorter look like he is undeserving of all the attention.) That is before a conceptual on-stage performance that puts his mainly female audience in hysterics, with a few looking like they are on the verge of an orgasm. But even at this early stage in his career, director Peter Watkins has bigger fish to fry than just celebrity with this thought-provoking, intelligent and powerful movie that is also the most creatively filmed of his docufictions. Set in the near future, this could also be our present, as the film is prescient about many things including music videos(recalling Shorter's performance on stage), the abomination of reality television(you will never be able to watch a promo for 'American Idol' the same way ever again) and Tony Blair's New Labour. In this world of almost one political party, there is conformity across the board, beginning from the top, and eventually laterally applied at the lower levels of society. The powers that be have co-opted and commodified Shorter, and through him, rebellion, so much that Vanessa(Jean Shrimpton), who has been hired to paint his portrait, is the only person not in awe of him. And whereas Ken Russell saw the rock star as god, Watkins sees religion as just another business to corrupt the rock star.
    Walter M Super Reviewer
  • Jul 15, 2010
    I'm guessing this is probably one of the earliest examples of a "mocumentary", which is impressive. What is also impressive is how eerily prophetic it is, to spite it's (sometimes) painfully dated moments. A telling look at the making, selling and ultimate distruction of a pop star. It is both campy and tragic. With some very interesting (and over the top) themes and visuals. It is no doubt used as a training film for the "talent" teams at Disney, who seem to think that every child actor needs to have a recording career and every child singer an acting career. And above all else - sell, sell, sell. There is no room for individual creativity, expression, integrity or (heaven forbid) dignity...use them until they are are no longer sellable and them kick them to the curb.
    Robert C Super Reviewer

Privilege Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Movie & TV guides