The Devil We Know Reviews

  • May 27, 2020

    Honestly, I thought the movie was boring in some areas. The beginning was extremely eerie and chilling, it definitely grabbed my attention. As the movie went on, it explained the history of DuPont and how the chemicals they produce caused a cluster of cancer cases in a small town in West Virginia. The personal stories of past employees had a lot of emotional appeal, especially the man who grew up with birth defects because of the chemical. I found my attention wondering when the documentary discussed the legal aspects of the story, I thought this was interesting because this is usually what grabs my interest in these documentaries. I would recommend this documentary to my friends because it's important to realize how corporations like DuPont pollute the environment.

    Honestly, I thought the movie was boring in some areas. The beginning was extremely eerie and chilling, it definitely grabbed my attention. As the movie went on, it explained the history of DuPont and how the chemicals they produce caused a cluster of cancer cases in a small town in West Virginia. The personal stories of past employees had a lot of emotional appeal, especially the man who grew up with birth defects because of the chemical. I found my attention wondering when the documentary discussed the legal aspects of the story, I thought this was interesting because this is usually what grabs my interest in these documentaries. I would recommend this documentary to my friends because it's important to realize how corporations like DuPont pollute the environment.

  • Jan 05, 2020

    Really terrifying...

    Really terrifying...

  • Nov 17, 2019

    A documentary about how DuPont knew about the dangers of PFOA's used to make Teflon, how it hurt people, and how they tried to deny and cover it up but concerned people pressed it and found the truth. The investigative parts are very engaging and disturbing. They're a little dramatized, but like with any documentary there's a weird balance of trying to be objective but making it engaging for a wide audience to consume. There's lots of parts with people talking about how they were affected, but the parts about the guy with the deformity and his family found my attention wandering. But overall a solid doc.

    A documentary about how DuPont knew about the dangers of PFOA's used to make Teflon, how it hurt people, and how they tried to deny and cover it up but concerned people pressed it and found the truth. The investigative parts are very engaging and disturbing. They're a little dramatized, but like with any documentary there's a weird balance of trying to be objective but making it engaging for a wide audience to consume. There's lots of parts with people talking about how they were affected, but the parts about the guy with the deformity and his family found my attention wandering. But overall a solid doc.

  • Nov 09, 2019

    Very informative and equally entertaining. Not the best documentary ever made, but better than average.

    Very informative and equally entertaining. Not the best documentary ever made, but better than average.

  • Jun 09, 2019

    Awesome movie!! This is the Chernobyl of drinking water. Teflon tails on these can not be biodegraded in water, contaminating your blood forever. Water from up stream paper mills was contaminated from grease proof paper making and commercial laundry and fabric treatment plants dumping effluent into your water. Bottom line: drink activated charcoal filtered water. God Bless You, Glenn Evers (whistle Blower)

    Awesome movie!! This is the Chernobyl of drinking water. Teflon tails on these can not be biodegraded in water, contaminating your blood forever. Water from up stream paper mills was contaminated from grease proof paper making and commercial laundry and fabric treatment plants dumping effluent into your water. Bottom line: drink activated charcoal filtered water. God Bless You, Glenn Evers (whistle Blower)

  • May 29, 2019

    Well, so much for using non-stick pans...

    Well, so much for using non-stick pans...

  • Mar 25, 2019

    I grew up in Parkersburg. Oh, snap. This is a very good documentary with a mix of video depositions, archival footage, and current interviews with the key (plaintiffs) players.

    I grew up in Parkersburg. Oh, snap. This is a very good documentary with a mix of video depositions, archival footage, and current interviews with the key (plaintiffs) players.

  • Feb 20, 2019

    Wow. worth the the watch.

    Wow. worth the the watch.

  • Feb 08, 2019

    As documentaries go it's a good one. Blobbo thinks that by design, corporations have no heart so can't be people.. Blobbo think Citizens United must be reversed.

    As documentaries go it's a good one. Blobbo thinks that by design, corporations have no heart so can't be people.. Blobbo think Citizens United must be reversed.

  • Jan 27, 2019

    This is a really good example of why we should not let corporations regulate themselves, and do their own safety/toxicity testing. Itï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s also a good example of how the government allows these practices to continue, despite overwhelming evidence of harm. For people who trust the EPA, FDA, and corporations to be looking out for their best interests, stories like these show that they are all only interested in one thing: money. They do not care about who they hurt to get it, and the only way to do anything to stop them is years of idependent research and huge lawsuits, if you can even get that far. Yet even then, the companies are allowed to continue, to make new products that are self-regulated, that are just as toxic. But they learned nothing from their past mistakes, because they were never truly held accountable. So they figure it doesnï¿ 1/2(TM)t matter if itï¿ 1/2(TM)s toxic, it will take decades to prove it with the new product, during which time they can continue to make hundreds of billions of dollars. If mass poisoning and large-scale fraud isnï¿ 1/2(TM)t enough to shut down a corporation, I donï¿ 1/2(TM)t know what is. I am grateful to this documentary for exposing this to the American public, but what can we do? Even if we avoid all DuPont products, itï¿ 1/2(TM)s still in our water. Just like glyphosate, and thousands of other toxic chemicals that are dumped into our lands and waterways every day, by hundreds of corporations all over the world. At what point is enough, enough? But what happens when an entire industry canï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t be sued for issues with safety? What happens when the agencies trusted to regulate them, simply donï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t? I think we have now seen that for ourselves, and our children are paying the ultimate price.

    This is a really good example of why we should not let corporations regulate themselves, and do their own safety/toxicity testing. Itï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s also a good example of how the government allows these practices to continue, despite overwhelming evidence of harm. For people who trust the EPA, FDA, and corporations to be looking out for their best interests, stories like these show that they are all only interested in one thing: money. They do not care about who they hurt to get it, and the only way to do anything to stop them is years of idependent research and huge lawsuits, if you can even get that far. Yet even then, the companies are allowed to continue, to make new products that are self-regulated, that are just as toxic. But they learned nothing from their past mistakes, because they were never truly held accountable. So they figure it doesnï¿ 1/2(TM)t matter if itï¿ 1/2(TM)s toxic, it will take decades to prove it with the new product, during which time they can continue to make hundreds of billions of dollars. If mass poisoning and large-scale fraud isnï¿ 1/2(TM)t enough to shut down a corporation, I donï¿ 1/2(TM)t know what is. I am grateful to this documentary for exposing this to the American public, but what can we do? Even if we avoid all DuPont products, itï¿ 1/2(TM)s still in our water. Just like glyphosate, and thousands of other toxic chemicals that are dumped into our lands and waterways every day, by hundreds of corporations all over the world. At what point is enough, enough? But what happens when an entire industry canï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t be sued for issues with safety? What happens when the agencies trusted to regulate them, simply donï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t? I think we have now seen that for ourselves, and our children are paying the ultimate price.