The Invisible Woman Reviews

  • Jul 02, 2019

    Fiennes tries a lot, but there is a superior power and to-be-fair stronger character in Jones's side. The Invisible Woman Fiennes has a magic show for us. And the magic is that there is no trick. But the trick itself is the entity showcased in here. The director, Ralph Fiennes is not a persuasive filmmaker. In the sense, he doesn't stand in front of us, up close, with an expressive face. He doesn't want you to get the joke, if he is doing a stand up. He is confident in his method. And ergo, the antics aren't there at all. There is nothing to look forward to or look back to. The film is present. Live. There, on the stage. The subjective procedure is mellow, deliberately. Also, another odd thing I picked up is how there are no elements trailed to follow or climb the ladder step by step. Personally, I loved this aspect of the film. For instance, usually after an epilogue the film has setup the characters, mood and the trajectory that it pretty much will follow for the next two acts. But in here, if a guy and a girl is to fall in love, there are no acts enfolding regarding that subject. Now it is incredibly risky to fiddle with a sensitive part of the film, since this is the crux and blood of the entire phenomenon. If the audience doesn't understand the weight of this lead equation, the film would never work. And Fiennes draws from this emotion from real life. This feeling doesn't creep up step by step in the narration but is present as soon as Nelly played by Felicity Jones meets Feinnes as Charles Dickens. Those two in the room says it all, they don't have to go through certain circumstances created artificially or naturally to understand that they have fallen for each other. The resistance in the body language and the breathe gives away The Invisible Woman.

    Fiennes tries a lot, but there is a superior power and to-be-fair stronger character in Jones's side. The Invisible Woman Fiennes has a magic show for us. And the magic is that there is no trick. But the trick itself is the entity showcased in here. The director, Ralph Fiennes is not a persuasive filmmaker. In the sense, he doesn't stand in front of us, up close, with an expressive face. He doesn't want you to get the joke, if he is doing a stand up. He is confident in his method. And ergo, the antics aren't there at all. There is nothing to look forward to or look back to. The film is present. Live. There, on the stage. The subjective procedure is mellow, deliberately. Also, another odd thing I picked up is how there are no elements trailed to follow or climb the ladder step by step. Personally, I loved this aspect of the film. For instance, usually after an epilogue the film has setup the characters, mood and the trajectory that it pretty much will follow for the next two acts. But in here, if a guy and a girl is to fall in love, there are no acts enfolding regarding that subject. Now it is incredibly risky to fiddle with a sensitive part of the film, since this is the crux and blood of the entire phenomenon. If the audience doesn't understand the weight of this lead equation, the film would never work. And Fiennes draws from this emotion from real life. This feeling doesn't creep up step by step in the narration but is present as soon as Nelly played by Felicity Jones meets Feinnes as Charles Dickens. Those two in the room says it all, they don't have to go through certain circumstances created artificially or naturally to understand that they have fallen for each other. The resistance in the body language and the breathe gives away The Invisible Woman.

  • Mar 05, 2017

    The costume design and production design are both impressive and the performances are decent. But the script it's a slow slow burn and the movie is pretty darn boring. I wasn't engaged at all with the characters or story. A snoozer. Don't watch this one if you're tired.

    The costume design and production design are both impressive and the performances are decent. But the script it's a slow slow burn and the movie is pretty darn boring. I wasn't engaged at all with the characters or story. A snoozer. Don't watch this one if you're tired.

  • Feb 03, 2017

    A grotesque romanticization of an extremely selfish and cruel act on the part of a man who exploited his power and position to needlessly wound the woman and children who had a right to expect the reverse treatment. The attempt to assert that 'Nelly' actually loved Dickens seems more like wishful thinking on the part of the middle-aged director. It falls apart on the slightest historical investigation, nor does it hold up in the film. There's zero chemistry between the lead roles. As to the artistic direction, yes the acting was good, but when the days of shaky cam and self-indulgent long shots end, it will be a great day for cinema.

    A grotesque romanticization of an extremely selfish and cruel act on the part of a man who exploited his power and position to needlessly wound the woman and children who had a right to expect the reverse treatment. The attempt to assert that 'Nelly' actually loved Dickens seems more like wishful thinking on the part of the middle-aged director. It falls apart on the slightest historical investigation, nor does it hold up in the film. There's zero chemistry between the lead roles. As to the artistic direction, yes the acting was good, but when the days of shaky cam and self-indulgent long shots end, it will be a great day for cinema.

  • Sep 05, 2016

    A beautiful looking (costumes, sets, geography) and finely filmed period piece. Three quarters of the film is subtle, delicately exposing the complications of falling in love within the confines of expected and established social conventions. The last quarter of the film though loses this subtlety and dips into melodrama with a hasty and unconvincing ending.

    A beautiful looking (costumes, sets, geography) and finely filmed period piece. Three quarters of the film is subtle, delicately exposing the complications of falling in love within the confines of expected and established social conventions. The last quarter of the film though loses this subtlety and dips into melodrama with a hasty and unconvincing ending.

  • Aug 10, 2016

    Ralph Fienes Coriolanus hinted at some gall behind the camera to mirror his gall in front of it, but this film squashes all hope of that. It is exactly the reason actors are loathed to direct. A weepy, treacly, overly-sentimental true story with no subtext that is a bore to watch. Fiennes' Charles Dickens is only mildly interesting as he leaves his wife for another woman he takes as his mistress. Felicity Jones plays the mistress and bookends the film as the same mistress as an unhappily married older woman whose greatest memories are of DIckens. Jones is once again a black hole of charisma with an inert character whose sole attribute is "proud." Fiennes should stick to good roles in other people's films.

    Ralph Fienes Coriolanus hinted at some gall behind the camera to mirror his gall in front of it, but this film squashes all hope of that. It is exactly the reason actors are loathed to direct. A weepy, treacly, overly-sentimental true story with no subtext that is a bore to watch. Fiennes' Charles Dickens is only mildly interesting as he leaves his wife for another woman he takes as his mistress. Felicity Jones plays the mistress and bookends the film as the same mistress as an unhappily married older woman whose greatest memories are of DIckens. Jones is once again a black hole of charisma with an inert character whose sole attribute is "proud." Fiennes should stick to good roles in other people's films.

  • Jun 30, 2016

    I love romantic movies because I enjoy losing myself for a few hours and being totally absorbed by the screen. It was easy to keep track of myself for the entire time as I did not feel any chemistry between Nelly and Charles. However, I appreciated the period costumes and the story line. I feel like I am in the know now about the long affair of Charles and Nelly. I am glad that I took the time to watch.

    I love romantic movies because I enjoy losing myself for a few hours and being totally absorbed by the screen. It was easy to keep track of myself for the entire time as I did not feel any chemistry between Nelly and Charles. However, I appreciated the period costumes and the story line. I feel like I am in the know now about the long affair of Charles and Nelly. I am glad that I took the time to watch.

  • Mar 07, 2016

    For me a terrible boring story set in an aria which i don't like....the first 40 minutes did hurt my eyes and ears , second half they start a relation , got a baby , baby dies ....blablabla relation over !

    For me a terrible boring story set in an aria which i don't like....the first 40 minutes did hurt my eyes and ears , second half they start a relation , got a baby , baby dies ....blablabla relation over !

  • Feb 23, 2016

    As cute and believable as Jones is, the rest is awkward, unbalanced and without any real depth or goals. I am not sure what the real point of the story was. That Dickens had an long affair with a woman he kept secret? It somehow made that question into a two hour movie. Showing and telling little else.

    As cute and believable as Jones is, the rest is awkward, unbalanced and without any real depth or goals. I am not sure what the real point of the story was. That Dickens had an long affair with a woman he kept secret? It somehow made that question into a two hour movie. Showing and telling little else.

  • Nov 29, 2015

    un film ennuyant qui se passe beaucoup au théâtre. A éviter

    un film ennuyant qui se passe beaucoup au théâtre. A éviter

  • Aug 16, 2015

    Dull and unengaging, despite the cast. The true story of how, in later life, Charles Dickens (played by Ralph Fiennes), while married, becomes infatuated with a younger woman, Nelly (played by Felicity Jones). The movie follows their relationship. On the plus side, this isn't your usual syrupy-sweet, trite romance. There is a degree of vulnerability on both sides, and it's not all wine-and-roses. However, the story never really grabs you. It just seems to drift along with the only telling scene being the final one involving Felicity Jones. On that note, Felicity Jones is wonderful (as always) as Nelly. Ralph Fiennes is solid as Charles Dickens. Good support from Kristen Scott Thomas.

    Dull and unengaging, despite the cast. The true story of how, in later life, Charles Dickens (played by Ralph Fiennes), while married, becomes infatuated with a younger woman, Nelly (played by Felicity Jones). The movie follows their relationship. On the plus side, this isn't your usual syrupy-sweet, trite romance. There is a degree of vulnerability on both sides, and it's not all wine-and-roses. However, the story never really grabs you. It just seems to drift along with the only telling scene being the final one involving Felicity Jones. On that note, Felicity Jones is wonderful (as always) as Nelly. Ralph Fiennes is solid as Charles Dickens. Good support from Kristen Scott Thomas.