The River

1951, Drama, 1h 38m

24 Reviews 1,000+ Ratings

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critics consensus

Jean Renoir's first film shot in color takes full advantage of its broadened palette, yielding a visually virtuosic coming of age tale filled with moving performances and vibrant hues. Read critic reviews

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Movie Info

In West Bengal, both Harriet, the daughter of a jute mill owner, and her best friend, Valerie, become captivated by dashing visitor Capt. John, who ignores them for sultry Melanie. However, all find that their lives are shaken up after Harriet's brother is involved in a tragedy.

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Critic Reviews for The River

All Critics (24) | Top Critics (5) | Fresh (22) | Rotten (2)

  • It emphasizes Technicolor's vibrancy, but it's also notable for the way it accentuates muted tones, like the clay bricks and the sand by the riverbanks.

    April 23, 2015 | Rating: 4.5/5 | Full Review…
  • Jean Renoir's 1951 masterpiece, his first film in color.

    October 24, 2007 | Full Review…
  • Gloriously photographed and providing perceptive insights into contrasting cultures, this melodrama flows with the majesty of the Ganges. But its attitudes to race and gender now sit as uncomfortably as some of the performances.

    December 30, 2006 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…
  • Here India seemed to be portrayed as if in a 1950s travelogue.

    October 4, 2006 | Full Review…
  • Renoir's location work in India and his semi-documentary excursions look great, juxtaposed as they are with his bold fantasy sequences evoking India's spiritual life.

    September 29, 2006 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…
  • Withal, the illustrations of the country are beautiful beyond words-the serenity of the river, the power of boatmen sweeping its stream, the bazaars full of color and movement, [and] the dazzling brilliance of festivals.

    March 25, 2006 | Rating: 3.5/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The River

  • May 16, 2009
    Jean Renoir is one of my favorite filmmakers, I especially love the films The Rules of the Game and Grand Illusion, both excellent looks class and war respectively. This film was made a good ten years after both and was his first color film. The film is in English (though it was not made in Hollywood) and was filmed in India. It?s told from the perspective of a British girl of about twelve or thirteen living with her family in colonial India next to the titular river (The Ganges). The film follows a fairly standard coming of age formula, the girl is infatuated with the wounded American war veteran who has moved in next door even though he is clearly more interested in her older sister. The plot isn?t really what the focus is here, the focus is really more on the backdrop of the river, which is a symbol for the stream of life which is juxtaposed with the trivialities of this day to day life. The film?s color photography is beautiful, it has that three strip Technicolor look to it that reminded me of the look of Powell and Presburger?s films. The setting must have felt very exotic to audiences at the time. The view of India is very much from the perspective of the colonial outsider and it often glosses over the social realities of the Indian people. It?s not the most politically interested film, and that is a surprise given Renoir?s previous examinations of class and poverty earlier in his career. I thought the acting was pretty weak during a lot of it, the main character has a lot of typical child actress weaknesses, and Thomas E. Breen is also pretty weak in the film (he was a non-actor). I wasn?t particularly impressed by it outside of it?s technical aspects for most of the running time, but a funny thing happened somewhere in the third act? I began to care about the characters, a lot. I really started to worry about their fates and by the end I really wanted to keep watching these people.
    MJS M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 14, 2009
    This was not the man vs. nature struggle I was rather expecting from the title, in fact this was directed by Jean Renoir and is a coming-of-age tale centered around an English family living in India. Watching the growing pains of privileged teenage sisters who are not particularly likable is not my idea of a great time at the movies, but the colors, sounds, and surroundings of India - shot entirely on location - makes it palatable.
    Doctor S Super Reviewer
  • Oct 17, 2007
    The shots of the family sleeping in the afternoon are my favorite part. And the Indian boy crying at the funeral.
    Tom S Super Reviewer
  • Jun 05, 2007
    Martin Scorcese considers this and Michael Powell's Red Shoes to be the most beautifully photographed Technicolor films in history. It's hard to disagree. The craft and photography in this film belongs on the list with The Searchers, Il Conformista, and In the Mood for Love as the greatest achievments of color photography
    Ken S Super Reviewer

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