To Catch a Thief Reviews

  • Aug 30, 2020

    A classic Hitchcock film that is - obviously - far from being one of his best. Nonetheless, it is a very enjoyable film that one can always feel is recommendable.

    A classic Hitchcock film that is - obviously - far from being one of his best. Nonetheless, it is a very enjoyable film that one can always feel is recommendable.

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    Aldo G Super Reviewer
    Aug 23, 2020

    65 years after its release I've finally caught To Catch A Thief. It's everything I've heard it was: not one of Alfred Hitchcock's best, but anything subpar by Hitch is better than most. Cary Grant was lured out of retirement at the opportunity to work with Grace Kelly and shoot in the south of France. But, the pair lack the fireworks I expected, despite an intimate scene with literal fireworks in the background. The on-location shooting is spectacular.

    65 years after its release I've finally caught To Catch A Thief. It's everything I've heard it was: not one of Alfred Hitchcock's best, but anything subpar by Hitch is better than most. Cary Grant was lured out of retirement at the opportunity to work with Grace Kelly and shoot in the south of France. But, the pair lack the fireworks I expected, despite an intimate scene with literal fireworks in the background. The on-location shooting is spectacular.

  • Aug 19, 2020

    One of Alfred Hitchcock's charming films, this 1955 classic stars two of cinema's brightest stars, the handsome Cary Grant and the beautiful Princess Grace Kelly. The story, vividly written by John Michael Hayes, has everything to see in a film: romance, action, thrills, and a few necessary laughs. A must-see film.

    One of Alfred Hitchcock's charming films, this 1955 classic stars two of cinema's brightest stars, the handsome Cary Grant and the beautiful Princess Grace Kelly. The story, vividly written by John Michael Hayes, has everything to see in a film: romance, action, thrills, and a few necessary laughs. A must-see film.

  • Jul 21, 2020

    Predictable but entertaining.

    Predictable but entertaining.

  • Jul 14, 2020

    Middle-of-the-road Hitch, with visuals that are as expressionistic as they are unconcealed (cutting between fireworks and foreplay, his penchant for green lighting in dark scenes). Where the movie works is in the dialogue, performances and mystery building…even if the eventual reveal is less than totally inspired.

    Middle-of-the-road Hitch, with visuals that are as expressionistic as they are unconcealed (cutting between fireworks and foreplay, his penchant for green lighting in dark scenes). Where the movie works is in the dialogue, performances and mystery building…even if the eventual reveal is less than totally inspired.

  • May 28, 2020

    Beautiful locations, engrossing mystery and the charismatic pairing of Cary Grant and Grace Kelly deliver a stunning addition to Alfred Hitchcocks filmography. Cary Grant play a retired jewel thief called John Robie, who's techniques are being used by a copycat in the French Riviera. Accused and pursued by the French Police, Robie must clear his name and identify the actual thief. Whilst scoping out potential targets for the thief, he become involved with Grace Kelly's Francie Stephens whos mother is the potential next victim. The second act does coast along, without much story progression, but relies on the electric chemistry between the two leads. But, watching their courtship unfold against the Canne back drop is still engrossing and entertaining. The two leads bring their A game to this mystery and both convincing in their respective roles. Hitchcock has crafted another exciting and captivating mystery. But, does rely on the chemistry of Grant and Kelly a little too much. Grant could have easily carried this film, as a retired thief determined to uncover the copycat, on his own shoulder and it still would have been a great film. Adding Kelly as an obstacle and later love interest, elevates the film to make a remarkable and classic picture.

    Beautiful locations, engrossing mystery and the charismatic pairing of Cary Grant and Grace Kelly deliver a stunning addition to Alfred Hitchcocks filmography. Cary Grant play a retired jewel thief called John Robie, who's techniques are being used by a copycat in the French Riviera. Accused and pursued by the French Police, Robie must clear his name and identify the actual thief. Whilst scoping out potential targets for the thief, he become involved with Grace Kelly's Francie Stephens whos mother is the potential next victim. The second act does coast along, without much story progression, but relies on the electric chemistry between the two leads. But, watching their courtship unfold against the Canne back drop is still engrossing and entertaining. The two leads bring their A game to this mystery and both convincing in their respective roles. Hitchcock has crafted another exciting and captivating mystery. But, does rely on the chemistry of Grant and Kelly a little too much. Grant could have easily carried this film, as a retired thief determined to uncover the copycat, on his own shoulder and it still would have been a great film. Adding Kelly as an obstacle and later love interest, elevates the film to make a remarkable and classic picture.

  • May 25, 2020

    A love tale is evolving while there is actually a big mystery, the astonishing cinematography, the perfect match between the couple starring and costume design captures the main essence in this beloved film.

    A love tale is evolving while there is actually a big mystery, the astonishing cinematography, the perfect match between the couple starring and costume design captures the main essence in this beloved film.

  • May 22, 2020

    This Alfred Hitchcock film was an unfortunate disappointment. Lack of a real story plot and suspense. The contrast was too dynamic as compared to The Birds and Rear Window. Although I liked Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, there is nothing worth seeing except their chemistry but not the way they portray their characters. The color of the film allowed me to watch it clear, but not worthy to watch after once.

    This Alfred Hitchcock film was an unfortunate disappointment. Lack of a real story plot and suspense. The contrast was too dynamic as compared to The Birds and Rear Window. Although I liked Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, there is nothing worth seeing except their chemistry but not the way they portray their characters. The color of the film allowed me to watch it clear, but not worthy to watch after once.

  • May 11, 2020

    It's certainly flawed, but is highly recommendable than to its outstanding lead cast and engaging story.

    It's certainly flawed, but is highly recommendable than to its outstanding lead cast and engaging story.

  • May 08, 2020

    To Catch a Pleasure. Exactly 364 days separate the release of Rear Window (1954) and To Catch a Thief (1955), two of the most famous and beloved Alfred Hitchcock's movies, who in those years was probably at the peak of his popularity and success, both with the audience and the critics. Nevertheless, although both sports some of the typical filmic elements of the Leytonstone's director, few similarities and an irresistibly charming Grace Kelly, the two movies couldn't be more different: where James Stewart was confined to his wheelchair observing other people's lives, Cary Grant is an acrobat, as he really was in his youth, constantly observed by the Police, his past accomplices, women, an insurance detective, really everybody, where Rear Window was static and indoor, To Catch a Thief is dynamic and outdoor. John Robie (a debonair fifty-one years old Cary Grant who, although handsome and charming, could never be seriously taken for a man in his mid-thirties as pretended in the film, probably to prudently reduce the age gap with a twenty-five years old Grace Kelly), a former acrobat and jewels thief turned WWII Resistance hero, is peacefully and gracefully enjoying the results of his rewarding profession in a golden retreat in the south of France when a series of high profile jewels robberies copycatting his unique style put him under investigation as the perfect ‘usual suspect'. Since, as everybody knows, you need a thief to catch a thief, John springs into action to bring to justice the real culprit, helped by the apparently quite but in reality strong-willed and wittily sensual American heiress Frances Stevens, to whom Grace Kelly lends a breath-taking absolute beauty in her last Hitchcock's movie before becoming soon a real princess. One of first movies filmed in Vistavision, a format that allowed depth and focus effects revolutionary for the times, To Catch a Thief is belonging more to the comedy genre than to the thriller one; the film is gifted with graceful performances, not only of the protagonists but also by Jessie Royce Landis as Grace Kelly's mother and Brigitte Auber as a key, young and outspoken French character, as well as brilliant dialogues, generously sprinkled with sexual innuendos, rather daring for the mid-fifties. Rightly categorized as a romantic thriller, To Catch a Thief in the end has only one real suspense: will Cary Grant and Grace Kelly stay together at the end of the movie? The film has remained, even after so many years, still very enjoyable to watch over and over again, oozing refreshing levity and glee in the cinematography, which gained Robert Burks an Oscar, and in the characters, as highlighted by the sexual cheeky impudence of both Grace Kelly and Brigitte Auber, who made John Robie an immediate hero and role model for almost every man on earth!

    To Catch a Pleasure. Exactly 364 days separate the release of Rear Window (1954) and To Catch a Thief (1955), two of the most famous and beloved Alfred Hitchcock's movies, who in those years was probably at the peak of his popularity and success, both with the audience and the critics. Nevertheless, although both sports some of the typical filmic elements of the Leytonstone's director, few similarities and an irresistibly charming Grace Kelly, the two movies couldn't be more different: where James Stewart was confined to his wheelchair observing other people's lives, Cary Grant is an acrobat, as he really was in his youth, constantly observed by the Police, his past accomplices, women, an insurance detective, really everybody, where Rear Window was static and indoor, To Catch a Thief is dynamic and outdoor. John Robie (a debonair fifty-one years old Cary Grant who, although handsome and charming, could never be seriously taken for a man in his mid-thirties as pretended in the film, probably to prudently reduce the age gap with a twenty-five years old Grace Kelly), a former acrobat and jewels thief turned WWII Resistance hero, is peacefully and gracefully enjoying the results of his rewarding profession in a golden retreat in the south of France when a series of high profile jewels robberies copycatting his unique style put him under investigation as the perfect ‘usual suspect'. Since, as everybody knows, you need a thief to catch a thief, John springs into action to bring to justice the real culprit, helped by the apparently quite but in reality strong-willed and wittily sensual American heiress Frances Stevens, to whom Grace Kelly lends a breath-taking absolute beauty in her last Hitchcock's movie before becoming soon a real princess. One of first movies filmed in Vistavision, a format that allowed depth and focus effects revolutionary for the times, To Catch a Thief is belonging more to the comedy genre than to the thriller one; the film is gifted with graceful performances, not only of the protagonists but also by Jessie Royce Landis as Grace Kelly's mother and Brigitte Auber as a key, young and outspoken French character, as well as brilliant dialogues, generously sprinkled with sexual innuendos, rather daring for the mid-fifties. Rightly categorized as a romantic thriller, To Catch a Thief in the end has only one real suspense: will Cary Grant and Grace Kelly stay together at the end of the movie? The film has remained, even after so many years, still very enjoyable to watch over and over again, oozing refreshing levity and glee in the cinematography, which gained Robert Burks an Oscar, and in the characters, as highlighted by the sexual cheeky impudence of both Grace Kelly and Brigitte Auber, who made John Robie an immediate hero and role model for almost every man on earth!