Verotika Reviews

  • Nate Z Super Reviewer
    15h ago

    Misfits frontman Glenn Danzig loved the heavy metal aesthetic of big breasted ladies, fetish outfits, hulking monsters, and splashy gore, enough so that he started his own comic line in the 90s, Verotik (a portmanteau of "violence" and "erotic," and yes that's the explanation). They even adapted one of his comics, Grub Girl, into a 2006 adult movie, and I pulled this synopsis directly from Wikipedia: "One of the victims of the radiation is a sex worker whose scarred body is taken to a laboratory, where she wakes up while being sexually abused by a pair of necrophilic scientists, whom she kills on account of having given her ‘the worst f*** of my life.' Grub Girl adjusts to being a zombie and returns to being a sex worker, discovering that being undead is advantageous to her career, as she is immune to disease and nearly impervious to pain." Yikes. Anyway, Danzig took three of his comic tales and packaged them together into a low-rent horror anthology movie dubbed Verotika. Unfortunately, the final product is nothing short of one of the worst movies I have ever seen in my life. It is stunningly, exceptionally terrible in all facets. I was left dumbstruck by the level of incompetence over the course of 89 ponderous minutes of awful. This goes beyond Tommy Wiseau and Neil Breen into downright Ed Woodian territory of ineptitude. I couldn't turn away because I was trying to simply process everything I was seeing onscreen, to boldly attempt to understand so many choices made by Danzig as a filmmaker and storyteller. He serves as writer, director, and co-cinematographer. The finished film is not the so-bad-it's-good derisive highs of Wiseau and Breen's bemoaned catalogue of misfires. This is more just a slack-jawed "what were they thinking?" stupefied curiosity of an After Last Season (the worst film of the first 2000s decade, a movie so bad its small distributor asked theaters to burn their prints rather than ship them back). It's not fun but baffling. It's not silly but lecherous to the point of misogyny and discomfort. At no point are you transported to the weird imagination of an avant garde artist but instead you're beset by huge lapses in filmmaking basics and a dearth of recognizable plot. With Verotika, there are no stories, only story premises that go nowhere and nowhere slow. While only 89 minutes long, it might be the most joyless, turgid, pointless 89 minutes I have experienced since After Last Season made an MRI machine out of paper print-outs. Allow me, dear reader, to describe for you the very opening minutes of Verotika, and please also understand that it only gets worse from there. The first segment is called "The Albino Spider of Dajette," and it's set inexplicably in France, which hamstrings every actor with a regrettable Pepe LePew accent that makes the segment even more ridiculous. Danzig could have spared his actors, who were clearly not capable of replicating French accents, the embarrassment but no. The opening minutes involve a busty woman, Dajette (Ashley Wisdom, porn actress), performing oral sex on a guy. He excitedly attempts to lift up her shirt, much to her chagrin, and is shocked to find that Dajette has eyeballs where her nipples should be. Yes, you read that correctly, she has literal eye nipples. The man leaves in horror and Dajette huffs dejectedly, "Not again." These eye nipples will never amount to anything important, which is so confounding. Why include them? Her eye nipples cry a tear, which rolls down her breast and lands on a CGI spider, which then grows into a giant albino spider-man (Scotch Hopkins) with two working arms. This evil spider-man only comes out when Dajette is asleep, though she's not sleeping now, so? He has a thirst for murder and sex and tells a prostitute he wants to rape her in the ass and then kill her. Her nonchalant response made me stare in amazement: "Ass f*** is my specialty." Reader, I have described for you only the first few minutes of this entire segment. What is going on here? The rest of this tale becomes repetitious as the spider-creature stalks and snaps more women's necks, earning the moniker the "Neck Snapper" from the French media (imagine the strained pronunciation as "Nyek Snauhpah"). Dajette wanders around to stay awake, and this includes entering an adult film theater where the patrons conspire to gang rape her as soon as she nods off. She also enters a café where someone else's cup is already waiting for her. Seconds later, a waiter asks if she wants any refills ("refeeelz"), and she declines and pays… for someone else's cup of coffee? Here's a prime example of the filmmaking shortcomings of Danzig. It would have been incredibly, stupidly easy to improve this scene simply by starting with Dajette at the table. By combining two shots of her walking along the street and then a shot of her indoors, still wearing her coat, and walking to a table, you are communicating an approximation of time. She has had no time to order her own coffee. All he had to do was start with her already seated and we could assume the cup was ordered off screen and before the edit. Verotika is replete with preventable bad decisions. Astonishingly, this segment is actually the best of the movie and each only gets demonstrably worse and more pointless. "Change of Face" is a clear homage/rip-off to 1960's Eyes Without a Face as we follow a stripper/serial killer known only as "Mystery Girl" (Rachel Allig) as she slices off the faces of beautiful women to wear as her own. Our killer wears the faces of her victims to cover her own scarred visage while she strips for her customers. Considering she wears a mask to cover her face anyway while she dances, the face-removals seem gratuitous. If you're looking for any clear motivation for this killer, even the simplest explanations, then you'll only be further disappointed. Again, it would be so stupidly easy for Danzig to characterize the "Mystery Girl" as murderously jealous of the beauty denied to her, or present some insecurity that her stripping career and income will be shuttered if she cannot fix her face. Anything would have worked. Instead we simply get an absence of thought and development; this segment is taxed with several minutes of watching women lackadaisically walk around a stripper pole. It feels like Danzig had access to a strip club set for a day and was determined to use everything he shot. The epilogue of this segment even involves more lackadaisical dancing around a pole. The only thing that enlivens this segment is the acting of Sean Kanan as the detective tracking down the murderer. He talks like he's trying to imitate Batman's gruff voice and his chit-chat is blasé to the point of anti-comedy ironic perfection. "There's your motive. They wanted a face," he says. His big break in the case is finding a business card at the crime scene. Why would a stripper have a business card and why would this man assume she must be the killer? That would be like finding a carton of milk at a crime scene and declaring that the milkman was your top suspect. The final segment is the most pointless of them all and feels like it should be visual accompaniment for talking heads on a History Channel special about Elizabeth Bathory, the notorious 16th century Hungarian noble who would bathe in the blood of virgins to stay young and vibrant. "Drukija Contessa of Blood" stars Alice Tate (Snowbound) as a woman who rubs blood on her face and body. That is literally the plot for thirty minutes. She slices some helpless women's necks. She luxuriates in a bath. She rides a horse. She decapitates a runaway. She eats a woman's heart while that victim inexplicably still writhes in agony well after the fact. There isn't even the faintest hint of a plot here or characters. You would think we would follow one of the imprisoned women as she plots an escape. Once again, it feels like Danzig had access to certain elements that he was going to make sure got their overexposed spotlight. We watch Drukija stare into a mirror and make poses for several minutes. We watch Drukija sit in her creepy skeleton-lined bathtub for several minutes. We watch her ride a horse for minutes on end. At no point does Danzig offer a reason for the audience to care about anything happening on screen. The cruelty just becomes boring and as gratuitous as any other unfortunate moment in this unfortunate movie. The whole segment feels like watching a bored model on a cosplay photo shoot. The fundamental lack of story, characters, conflict drives me nuts, but the movie fails just as badly on its technical merits. I can excuse some lapses in filmmaking from a continuity standpoint as long as they are not glaring to rip me out of the movie. Anyone that nitpicks the placement of bed sheets from shot-to-shot rather than emotional engagement and narrative drive is simply watching movies wrong. However, Verotika is complicit in making the kind of goofs and mistakes you'd associate with a schlocky student films and not a (gasp) million-dollar horror movie. Danzig favors ending every scene in a fade out, and I'm not exaggerating when I say "every." It's like he doesn't know when to end his own scenes (more on that below). There are specific limitations in the makeup and production design, but then why feature camera angles and lighting that expose those limitations? Things like the crotch of the spider-man being blown wide open and visible on camera or a superfluous CGI floor Drunkija struts over. There are a proliferation of lens flares, which I think Danzig feels are "arty," and they do provide a brief respite from the very grimy, over exposed photography that can be dispiriting. Even with a million dollars, this movie looks depressingly cheap. Then there are sloppy mistakes nobody bothered to correct. The neon "café" sign that Dajette enters is above the café window, not over it, and facing inward, which means no potential customer from the outside would get the benefit of the sign. Murder victims are extremely unmotivated to get away from their eventual killers. Certain physical confrontations are so confusingly staged that character geography will alter in a flash like a scene was missing. A shaken police officer laments "if the press finds out about this" about the THIRTEENTH murder victim. I think the cat's out of the bag, fella. Why do we need an Elvira-styled host (Kayden Kross, porn actress) making bad puns to introduce segments? As a director, Danzig leaves his actors adrift with awkwardly non-existent guidance. It becomes readily apparent that Danzig was afraid to call cut too soon because many shots will linger on long after the point has passed, leaving actors to fidget or look around, waiting to be told the take was over. Sometimes this involves literal minutes of an actor doing something repetitious while the camera will zoom in and out continually. There are moments where the camera will duck around, unclear about what it's meant to frame, looking for its subject or composition like a documentary filmmaker on the spot. Every actor suffers from this and shots and scenes have that uncomfortable feeling of dragging on haphazardly, missing the rhythm of film narratives. I bet you could shave those extraneous seconds off every scene and trim 15 minutes total. As a result of actors given bad material, nascent characterization when evident, funny accents, and little to no direction, there are plenty of actors struggling to perform whatever they're intending. Even as a low-budget sleazy exploitation film, Verotika cannot even succeed by that metric. The gore effects are few and far between and Danzig likes to linger over what he can get, much like other elements. If he bought the makeup for one girl to be skinned faceless, you're going to see that effect a dozen times. When the Contessa is chomping on a heart, the proportions are so out of scale that it dulls the impact of what is a fairly good prosthetic otherwise. Even when it comes to gratuitous sex and nudity, the movie seems oddly inept. During the interminable stripping scenes of "Change of Face," the women don't actually strip while they lethargically spin around their poles. The women on display are more fetishized as murder victims than they are as sex objects. Why include eye nipples and then do nothing with them? Where did they come from? Is this a genetic thing? Did Dajette's mother have eye nipples and nurse her from them? My pal Ben Bailey came up with a better storyline with "eye nipples" on the spot, gifting them laser powers and a thematic angle about striking back against handsy men who won't respect consent. Boom, right there, a better use of weird exploitation elements and he was only joking around. With every conceivable level of filmmaking and storytelling, Verotika shows that Danzig is not remotely ready for the big screen. The paltry story is kept at premise-level, there's a decided lack of characterization and stakes and intrigue, lots of repetition, and shaky direction that leaves actors astray with over-extended scenes. Even as an exploitation movie, you will be sorely disappointed. As a hopeful heir apparent to the so-bad-it's-good club, Verotika is not the next The Room. Not even close. It's bad and inept and boring and flabbergasting but it lacks the bewildering appeal of the best of the so-bad-it's-good crew. It lacks a sense of sincerity. I doubt Danzig thought he was making great art or even something cool. It feels like he took a music video concept and bloated it to bursting (Danzig's music is a constant background presence). Danzig actually has another movie scheduled for release this year, Death Rider in the House of Vampires, starring Devon Sawa, Julian Sands, and Danny Trejo. I can only hope he's learned from this baptism by fire (and blood) and surrounds himself with professionals who can carry the burden when he falters. Nate's Grade: F

    Misfits frontman Glenn Danzig loved the heavy metal aesthetic of big breasted ladies, fetish outfits, hulking monsters, and splashy gore, enough so that he started his own comic line in the 90s, Verotik (a portmanteau of "violence" and "erotic," and yes that's the explanation). They even adapted one of his comics, Grub Girl, into a 2006 adult movie, and I pulled this synopsis directly from Wikipedia: "One of the victims of the radiation is a sex worker whose scarred body is taken to a laboratory, where she wakes up while being sexually abused by a pair of necrophilic scientists, whom she kills on account of having given her ‘the worst f*** of my life.' Grub Girl adjusts to being a zombie and returns to being a sex worker, discovering that being undead is advantageous to her career, as she is immune to disease and nearly impervious to pain." Yikes. Anyway, Danzig took three of his comic tales and packaged them together into a low-rent horror anthology movie dubbed Verotika. Unfortunately, the final product is nothing short of one of the worst movies I have ever seen in my life. It is stunningly, exceptionally terrible in all facets. I was left dumbstruck by the level of incompetence over the course of 89 ponderous minutes of awful. This goes beyond Tommy Wiseau and Neil Breen into downright Ed Woodian territory of ineptitude. I couldn't turn away because I was trying to simply process everything I was seeing onscreen, to boldly attempt to understand so many choices made by Danzig as a filmmaker and storyteller. He serves as writer, director, and co-cinematographer. The finished film is not the so-bad-it's-good derisive highs of Wiseau and Breen's bemoaned catalogue of misfires. This is more just a slack-jawed "what were they thinking?" stupefied curiosity of an After Last Season (the worst film of the first 2000s decade, a movie so bad its small distributor asked theaters to burn their prints rather than ship them back). It's not fun but baffling. It's not silly but lecherous to the point of misogyny and discomfort. At no point are you transported to the weird imagination of an avant garde artist but instead you're beset by huge lapses in filmmaking basics and a dearth of recognizable plot. With Verotika, there are no stories, only story premises that go nowhere and nowhere slow. While only 89 minutes long, it might be the most joyless, turgid, pointless 89 minutes I have experienced since After Last Season made an MRI machine out of paper print-outs. Allow me, dear reader, to describe for you the very opening minutes of Verotika, and please also understand that it only gets worse from there. The first segment is called "The Albino Spider of Dajette," and it's set inexplicably in France, which hamstrings every actor with a regrettable Pepe LePew accent that makes the segment even more ridiculous. Danzig could have spared his actors, who were clearly not capable of replicating French accents, the embarrassment but no. The opening minutes involve a busty woman, Dajette (Ashley Wisdom, porn actress), performing oral sex on a guy. He excitedly attempts to lift up her shirt, much to her chagrin, and is shocked to find that Dajette has eyeballs where her nipples should be. Yes, you read that correctly, she has literal eye nipples. The man leaves in horror and Dajette huffs dejectedly, "Not again." These eye nipples will never amount to anything important, which is so confounding. Why include them? Her eye nipples cry a tear, which rolls down her breast and lands on a CGI spider, which then grows into a giant albino spider-man (Scotch Hopkins) with two working arms. This evil spider-man only comes out when Dajette is asleep, though she's not sleeping now, so? He has a thirst for murder and sex and tells a prostitute he wants to rape her in the ass and then kill her. Her nonchalant response made me stare in amazement: "Ass f*** is my specialty." Reader, I have described for you only the first few minutes of this entire segment. What is going on here? The rest of this tale becomes repetitious as the spider-creature stalks and snaps more women's necks, earning the moniker the "Neck Snapper" from the French media (imagine the strained pronunciation as "Nyek Snauhpah"). Dajette wanders around to stay awake, and this includes entering an adult film theater where the patrons conspire to gang rape her as soon as she nods off. She also enters a café where someone else's cup is already waiting for her. Seconds later, a waiter asks if she wants any refills ("refeeelz"), and she declines and pays… for someone else's cup of coffee? Here's a prime example of the filmmaking shortcomings of Danzig. It would have been incredibly, stupidly easy to improve this scene simply by starting with Dajette at the table. By combining two shots of her walking along the street and then a shot of her indoors, still wearing her coat, and walking to a table, you are communicating an approximation of time. She has had no time to order her own coffee. All he had to do was start with her already seated and we could assume the cup was ordered off screen and before the edit. Verotika is replete with preventable bad decisions. Astonishingly, this segment is actually the best of the movie and each only gets demonstrably worse and more pointless. "Change of Face" is a clear homage/rip-off to 1960's Eyes Without a Face as we follow a stripper/serial killer known only as "Mystery Girl" (Rachel Allig) as she slices off the faces of beautiful women to wear as her own. Our killer wears the faces of her victims to cover her own scarred visage while she strips for her customers. Considering she wears a mask to cover her face anyway while she dances, the face-removals seem gratuitous. If you're looking for any clear motivation for this killer, even the simplest explanations, then you'll only be further disappointed. Again, it would be so stupidly easy for Danzig to characterize the "Mystery Girl" as murderously jealous of the beauty denied to her, or present some insecurity that her stripping career and income will be shuttered if she cannot fix her face. Anything would have worked. Instead we simply get an absence of thought and development; this segment is taxed with several minutes of watching women lackadaisically walk around a stripper pole. It feels like Danzig had access to a strip club set for a day and was determined to use everything he shot. The epilogue of this segment even involves more lackadaisical dancing around a pole. The only thing that enlivens this segment is the acting of Sean Kanan as the detective tracking down the murderer. He talks like he's trying to imitate Batman's gruff voice and his chit-chat is blasé to the point of anti-comedy ironic perfection. "There's your motive. They wanted a face," he says. His big break in the case is finding a business card at the crime scene. Why would a stripper have a business card and why would this man assume she must be the killer? That would be like finding a carton of milk at a crime scene and declaring that the milkman was your top suspect. The final segment is the most pointless of them all and feels like it should be visual accompaniment for talking heads on a History Channel special about Elizabeth Bathory, the notorious 16th century Hungarian noble who would bathe in the blood of virgins to stay young and vibrant. "Drukija Contessa of Blood" stars Alice Tate (Snowbound) as a woman who rubs blood on her face and body. That is literally the plot for thirty minutes. She slices some helpless women's necks. She luxuriates in a bath. She rides a horse. She decapitates a runaway. She eats a woman's heart while that victim inexplicably still writhes in agony well after the fact. There isn't even the faintest hint of a plot here or characters. You would think we would follow one of the imprisoned women as she plots an escape. Once again, it feels like Danzig had access to certain elements that he was going to make sure got their overexposed spotlight. We watch Drukija stare into a mirror and make poses for several minutes. We watch Drukija sit in her creepy skeleton-lined bathtub for several minutes. We watch her ride a horse for minutes on end. At no point does Danzig offer a reason for the audience to care about anything happening on screen. The cruelty just becomes boring and as gratuitous as any other unfortunate moment in this unfortunate movie. The whole segment feels like watching a bored model on a cosplay photo shoot. The fundamental lack of story, characters, conflict drives me nuts, but the movie fails just as badly on its technical merits. I can excuse some lapses in filmmaking from a continuity standpoint as long as they are not glaring to rip me out of the movie. Anyone that nitpicks the placement of bed sheets from shot-to-shot rather than emotional engagement and narrative drive is simply watching movies wrong. However, Verotika is complicit in making the kind of goofs and mistakes you'd associate with a schlocky student films and not a (gasp) million-dollar horror movie. Danzig favors ending every scene in a fade out, and I'm not exaggerating when I say "every." It's like he doesn't know when to end his own scenes (more on that below). There are specific limitations in the makeup and production design, but then why feature camera angles and lighting that expose those limitations? Things like the crotch of the spider-man being blown wide open and visible on camera or a superfluous CGI floor Drunkija struts over. There are a proliferation of lens flares, which I think Danzig feels are "arty," and they do provide a brief respite from the very grimy, over exposed photography that can be dispiriting. Even with a million dollars, this movie looks depressingly cheap. Then there are sloppy mistakes nobody bothered to correct. The neon "café" sign that Dajette enters is above the café window, not over it, and facing inward, which means no potential customer from the outside would get the benefit of the sign. Murder victims are extremely unmotivated to get away from their eventual killers. Certain physical confrontations are so confusingly staged that character geography will alter in a flash like a scene was missing. A shaken police officer laments "if the press finds out about this" about the THIRTEENTH murder victim. I think the cat's out of the bag, fella. Why do we need an Elvira-styled host (Kayden Kross, porn actress) making bad puns to introduce segments? As a director, Danzig leaves his actors adrift with awkwardly non-existent guidance. It becomes readily apparent that Danzig was afraid to call cut too soon because many shots will linger on long after the point has passed, leaving actors to fidget or look around, waiting to be told the take was over. Sometimes this involves literal minutes of an actor doing something repetitious while the camera will zoom in and out continually. There are moments where the camera will duck around, unclear about what it's meant to frame, looking for its subject or composition like a documentary filmmaker on the spot. Every actor suffers from this and shots and scenes have that uncomfortable feeling of dragging on haphazardly, missing the rhythm of film narratives. I bet you could shave those extraneous seconds off every scene and trim 15 minutes total. As a result of actors given bad material, nascent characterization when evident, funny accents, and little to no direction, there are plenty of actors struggling to perform whatever they're intending. Even as a low-budget sleazy exploitation film, Verotika cannot even succeed by that metric. The gore effects are few and far between and Danzig likes to linger over what he can get, much like other elements. If he bought the makeup for one girl to be skinned faceless, you're going to see that effect a dozen times. When the Contessa is chomping on a heart, the proportions are so out of scale that it dulls the impact of what is a fairly good prosthetic otherwise. Even when it comes to gratuitous sex and nudity, the movie seems oddly inept. During the interminable stripping scenes of "Change of Face," the women don't actually strip while they lethargically spin around their poles. The women on display are more fetishized as murder victims than they are as sex objects. Why include eye nipples and then do nothing with them? Where did they come from? Is this a genetic thing? Did Dajette's mother have eye nipples and nurse her from them? My pal Ben Bailey came up with a better storyline with "eye nipples" on the spot, gifting them laser powers and a thematic angle about striking back against handsy men who won't respect consent. Boom, right there, a better use of weird exploitation elements and he was only joking around. With every conceivable level of filmmaking and storytelling, Verotika shows that Danzig is not remotely ready for the big screen. The paltry story is kept at premise-level, there's a decided lack of characterization and stakes and intrigue, lots of repetition, and shaky direction that leaves actors astray with over-extended scenes. Even as an exploitation movie, you will be sorely disappointed. As a hopeful heir apparent to the so-bad-it's-good club, Verotika is not the next The Room. Not even close. It's bad and inept and boring and flabbergasting but it lacks the bewildering appeal of the best of the so-bad-it's-good crew. It lacks a sense of sincerity. I doubt Danzig thought he was making great art or even something cool. It feels like he took a music video concept and bloated it to bursting (Danzig's music is a constant background presence). Danzig actually has another movie scheduled for release this year, Death Rider in the House of Vampires, starring Devon Sawa, Julian Sands, and Danny Trejo. I can only hope he's learned from this baptism by fire (and blood) and surrounds himself with professionals who can carry the burden when he falters. Nate's Grade: F

  • May 19, 2020

    Absolutely a total disaster piece of garbage and my god the porn actress is absolutely disgusted and terrible director and absolutely the worst screenplay and by far the worst movie since The Room.

    Absolutely a total disaster piece of garbage and my god the porn actress is absolutely disgusted and terrible director and absolutely the worst screenplay and by far the worst movie since The Room.

  • May 03, 2020

    Verotika es anticine. Es tan horriblemente mala, en todos los aspectos posibles, que me gustaria ponerle cero, y eso que no creo en los ceros. El problema es que no solo creo que la pelicula demuestre un autentico despliegue de ineptitud con las artes cinematográficas (nadie nace sabiendo), sino que mucho de lo terrible que es se debe a vagancia y arrogancia (estoy seguro al 90%). Es terrible, terrible.

    Verotika es anticine. Es tan horriblemente mala, en todos los aspectos posibles, que me gustaria ponerle cero, y eso que no creo en los ceros. El problema es que no solo creo que la pelicula demuestre un autentico despliegue de ineptitud con las artes cinematográficas (nadie nace sabiendo), sino que mucho de lo terrible que es se debe a vagancia y arrogancia (estoy seguro al 90%). Es terrible, terrible.

  • Apr 28, 2020

    2.5 stars because this is one of the worse films I've ever seen but I've also never laughed so much in my life. Imagine The Room but worse. Add alcohol to the mix and it's one of the best comedies ever made

    2.5 stars because this is one of the worse films I've ever seen but I've also never laughed so much in my life. Imagine The Room but worse. Add alcohol to the mix and it's one of the best comedies ever made

  • Apr 08, 2020

    I'm not convinced this movie exists. I think it might have been a drug indused fever dream. And like a dream - nothing makes sense, doesn't flow, and is baffling after it's over. But this ain't the kind of dream you forget moments after you wake up, unfortunately.

    I'm not convinced this movie exists. I think it might have been a drug indused fever dream. And like a dream - nothing makes sense, doesn't flow, and is baffling after it's over. But this ain't the kind of dream you forget moments after you wake up, unfortunately.

  • Mar 16, 2020

    Full warning, I haven't seen Verotika. A few other reviews have stated the plot and absurd storytelling. With its comical transitions, to the horrible acting and voices, anyone involved with this definitely didn't want this out to the public. Also, this film rips off many other superior movies. Counts towards as so bad that it's sometimes just good. This should provide enough absurd storytelling to show that anyone can just about making a movie.

    Full warning, I haven't seen Verotika. A few other reviews have stated the plot and absurd storytelling. With its comical transitions, to the horrible acting and voices, anyone involved with this definitely didn't want this out to the public. Also, this film rips off many other superior movies. Counts towards as so bad that it's sometimes just good. This should provide enough absurd storytelling to show that anyone can just about making a movie.

  • Mar 03, 2020

    Terrible and inept in every way a film can be.

    Terrible and inept in every way a film can be.

  • Feb 27, 2020

    I couldn't even get half way through this movie! Some of the worse crap that I've ever seen! It's a horrible porn film without the sex scenes. The acting and editing is pretty comical and It does have nudity but not enough to save this pos trash flik! Not much gore and blood either.

    I couldn't even get half way through this movie! Some of the worse crap that I've ever seen! It's a horrible porn film without the sex scenes. The acting and editing is pretty comical and It does have nudity but not enough to save this pos trash flik! Not much gore and blood either.